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o 

INDEX 

GEOGRAPHICUS INDICUS 

BBING 

A LIST, ALPHABETICALLY ARRANGED, 

OF THE 

Principal Places in Her Imperial Majesty's Indian Empire, 

WITH NOTES AND STATEMENTS 

STATISTICAL, POLITICAL, AND DESCRIPTIVE, 

OF THE SEVERAL 

PROVINCES AND ADMINISTRATIONS OF THE EMPIRE, 

THE NATIVE STATES, INDEPENDENT AND FEUDATORY, ATTACHED TO 
AND IN POLITICAL RELATIONSHIP WITH EACH ; 

AND OTHER INFORMATION RELATING TO INDIA AND THE EAST. 

WITH MAPS. 

Names spelt in accordance with recent authorised Orthography. 

BY 

J. FREDERICK BANESS, F.R.G.S., F.S. Sc. (Lond.) 

SURVEY OF INDIA. 

Surveyor and Chief Draftsman^ Geographical and Drawing Branch. 



-x>oo-^ 



c^0ttb0n: 

EDWARD STANFORD, 55, CHARING CROSa 

Calcutta: 

W. NEWMAN & CO., 3, DALHOUSIE SQUARE. 



1881. 



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^^ 






!^f?VARD COILEGE LIBRAEY 

AUG30lbal 

/ 



PRINTED BY W. NEWMAN AND CO. 
AT THE CAXTON PRESS, I, MISSION ROW, CALCUITA, 



Copyright Registered. ^o 



1 ,i 

4 



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TO 

HIS EXCELLENCY THE MOST HON'BLE 

GEORGE FREDERICK SAMUEL, 

VICEROY AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL OF INDIA. 

THIS WORK ON MODERN INDIAN GEOGRAPHY 

IS 

WITH THE DEEPEST RESPECT 
BY 

THE AUTHOR, 



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FI^EFACE. 



lMt>ERlAL India of the present day is a vast country and a varied field. It 
is a matter for surprise how little is known of its Geography as a whole. To 
convey a comprehensive knowledge of the Geography and present Extent and 
Resources of this great Empire, as well as of the Native States embraced 
therein, in a brief and convenient form, made as complete as a judicious 
utilization of available and auifientic materials of the most recent date could 
render it, has long been the desire of the compiler. The difficulty of bring- 
ing so wide a subject within convenient limits, so as to reduce the labour of 
reference to a minimum, has been very great ; how far success has been attained 
in the attempt now made, the public will decide. A work like this, — the first of 
its kind relating to Modem Indian Geography, — has involved considerable labor 
and thought, and no pains have been spared to make its form attractive as to 
arrangement, and its contents correct as to detail. As a handy work of refer- 
ence for the literary and official world of India, as well as of Europe, and for 
those whose work or tastes may lead them to enquire about matters connected 
with England's Indian Empire of the present time, it is hoped that this Index 
will prove of some practical value. 

The authorities consulted will be found at the end of the text. 

Calcutta, J. F. B. 

January 1881. 



ERRA.TA..— C0i?^i?cr youn copy. 

Page 18.— Mooltan Division. For District Station^ read, District Statistics. 
„ 20.— Height of Chamba. For ojj, read, 3033. 
n 34- — Lalitpur District. For 2^-42^^ read, 2^ -it!, 
„ 35. —Height of Pachmarhi. For jjj*?, read, 3538. 
„ 1 12. — Area of Sohawal. For joo square miles^ read, 238 square miles. 
n 112. — Area of Koti. For 100 square mileSy read, 174 square miles. 
„ 112.— Height of Rewah City, 1045, omitted. 
„ 112.— Height of Maihar City, 1335, omitted. 

„ 113.— Ali Rajpur, Latitude 22** 18' N., Longitude 74** 23' E., omitted. 
„ 122. — Longitude of Ootacamund. For 76'-/, read, 76**-44'. 
yy 123.— Longitude of French Rocks. For /d"-^, read, 76*'-43'. 
fi 154- — Line 10 from top. For Gorvemment, read, Government. 
„ 181.— Line 6 from bottom. For 43^00,000, read, 1,00,00,000. 

„ 182.— Line 6 from top. For in this respect, read, in respect to intrusion from without 
„ 186. — Line 14 from top. For settlement Europeans^ read, settlement of Europeans. 
„ 188. — Line 2 from top. For niost industrial, read, most industrious. 
„ 190.— Chhattisgarh. For parallels of Sd" 3d atid ^3** // N, and meridians of 16" sd 

and 2f id -£"., read, meridians of 80" 30' and 84" 15' E., and parallels of 

19" 50' and 23" 10' N. 
191— Harriana. For /j^*" d, read, 75** 20'. 



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A 



CONTENTS. 



m 



Page. 



The Indian Empire, or India 

British and Feudatory. 

Position— Coast Line— Area — Popula- 
tion — Revenue — Land Frontier 
Line — Length— Breadth 

Great Natural Divisions ... 

Length and Basin Areas of the Rivers of 
India 

The Provinces of British India, Statistics 

British India, other sources of Revenue 
Do. do., Population, classified ... 

Feudatory India 

Indian Railways— Indian Canals 

Principal Mountain Ranges 

The Punjab Province. 
Delhi Division— Hissar Division 
Umballa Division — Jullundur Division 
Amritsar Division — Lahore Division ... 
Rawalpindi Division— Mooltan Division 
Derajat Division— Peshawar Division 
Native Feudatory States, with notes ... 
Military Stations of the Punjab 
Frontier Tribes of the Punjab 
Brief General Description 

The N. W. Provinces and Oudh. 

Meerut Division, N. W. Provinces 

Rohilkhand Division, N. W. Provinces. 

Agra Division, N. W. Provinces 

Allahabad Division, N. W. Provinces ... 

Benares Division, N. W. Provinces ... 

Jhansi Division, N. W. Provinces 

Kumaun Division, N. W. Provinces ... 

Native Feudatory States, N. W. Provin- 
ces, with notes 

Military Stations, N. W. P. and Oudh... 

Brief General Description of the N. W. 
Provinces 

Lucknow Division, Oudh... 

Rae Bareli Division, Oudh 

Fyzabad Division, Oudh ... 

Sitapur Division, Oudh 

Brief General Description of Oudh ... 



9 
9 

9 
9 

lO 
lO 
10 

II 
II 

15 
i6 

17 
i8 

19 

20 
21 
21 
22 

29 
30 
31 
32 
33 

34 
34 

35 
35 

36 
40 
40 
41 
41 
42 



Page. 

The Bengal or Lower Provinces. 
Area of Territory under the Bengal Go- 
vernment ... ... 46 

Burdwan Division ... ... 47 

Presidency Division ... ... 48 

Rajshahye and Cooch Behar Division .. 49 

Dacca Division ... ... 50 

Chittagong Division ... ... 50 

Patna Division ... ... 51 

Bhagalpur Division ... ... 52 

Chota Nagpore Division ... ... S3 

Orissa Division ... ... 53 

Calcutta— Area, Population, Revenue, 

&c. ... ... ... 53 

Native Feudatory States, with notes ... 54 

Military Stations of Bengal ... 55 

Brief General Description ... 55 

The Assam Province. 

Districts of the Province ... ... 65 

Native Feudatory States, with notes ... 66 

Military Stations of Assam ... 67 

Brief General Description ... 67 

The Central Provinces. 

Nagpur Division ... ... 73 

Jubbulpore Division ... ... 74 

Nerbudda Division ... ... 75 

Chhattisgarh Division ... ... 76 

Native Feudatory States, with notes ... 77 
Other Zamindaris or Estates ... 78 
Military Stations of the Central Pro- 
vinces ... ... ... 78 

Brief General Description ... 79 

The British Burmah Province. 

Pegu Division ... ... ... 85 

Tenasserim Division ... ... 86 

Arakan Division ... ... 87 

Military Stations of British Burmah ... 87 

Native Feudatory States ... ... 87 

Rangoon— Area, Population, Revenue, 

&c. ... ... ... 87 

Brief General Description ... 88 



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IV 



Contents. 



Page. 

Berar, or the Hyderabad As- 
signed Districts. 
West Berar Division ... ...95 

East Berar Division ... ... 95 

Brief General Description of Berar ... 96 

Hyderabad, (The Nizam's Terri- 
tory) or the Deccan ... ... 97 

Districts of Hyderabad Native State ... 98 
Military Stations, Hyderabad ... 98 

The Rajputana Agency. 

British District of Ajmere-Merwara ... 101 
Military Stations, Rajputana Force ... loi 
Do. do. Mbow Division ... loi 

Do. do. Central India Force loi 

Native Feudatory States, with notes ... 102 
Brief General Description of Rajputana 104 

The Central India Agency. 

Native Feudatory States, with notes ... in 
Brief General Description of Central 

India ... ... ... 114 

The Madras Presidency. 
Area of Territory under the Madras 

Government ... ... 118 

Districts of the Presidency ... 119 

Military Stations of the Presidency ... 123 
Native Feudatory States, with notes ... 123 
Government Taluks and Zamindaris 

of the Presidency ... ... 124 

Ports of the Presidency ... 127 

Brief General Description... •„ 127 



Mysore (Native State.) 




Nundydroog Division 


... 133 


Ashtagram Division 


... 133 


Nagar Division 


•.. 133 


Brief General Description ... 


... 134 


Coorg Province. 




Sub-Divisions and Towns of Coorg 


... 137 


Brief General Description... 


•.. 137 



The Bombay Presidency. 
Area of Territory under the Bombay 

Government ... ... 142 

Northern Division ... •..143 



Page. 

. 144 
. 145 

. 146 

. 147 
. 148 

153 
163 

164 

167 
171 
173 
177 
178 
179 
180 
181 
182 
182 

182 

183 
183 

184 
184 

The Straits Settlements and Aden. 
Penang or Pulo Penang ... ... 186 

Province Wellesley ... ... 186 

Malacca ... ... ... 187 

Singapore ... ... ... 187 

Aden Settlement ... ... 188 

Perim Island ... ... ... 189 

Glossary of Indian Territorial 
Designations... ... ... 190 

Thermal Statistical Tables ... 194 

Religions and Peoples of India. 

Brief General Description 

Principal Indian Peoples and Tribes .. 

Authorities consulted ... 203 

Alphabetical Index of Principal 
Indian Names ... i to 112 



Central Division 

Southern Division 

Sind Division ... 

Military Stations of the Presidency .. 

Native Feudatory States, with notes.. 

Brief General Description ... 
The French Territories 
The Portuguese Territories 

Outlying Independent States. 
Afghanistan 
Afghan Ethnology 
Afghan Tribes ... 
Baluchistan 
Bhutan 

Cashmere or Kashmir 
Manipur 
Nepal 

Sikkim ... .., ... 

Tipperah (Hill) 

Ocean Islands. 
Andaman Islands and Cocos 
Nicobar Islands 
Laccadive Islands 
Maldive Islands 
Ceylon 



196 \ 
198 \ 



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5 
CONTENTS AND KEY 

TO THE DIVISIONS AND ADMINISTRATIONS OF 



INDIA. 



Under His Excellency the Viceroy and Gouernor-Geneml of India. 



1. The Indian Empire : or India, British and Feudatory. General Statements. 

2. The Presidency of Beng^, (See Glossary of Indian Territorial designations. ) 

embracing 3 Lieutenant Governments. 

3 Chief Commissionerships. 

1 Residentship. 

2 Governor-General's Agencies for Native or Foreign Territory. 
As follows, vi2. : — 

1. The Punjab Province, with the Native States K ..„^^. ^^„^,^^^ 

attached thereto. ... ... { Lieutenant-Governor. 

2. The North -Western Provinces and Oudh, with ) Lieutenant-Governor, N. W. P. and 

the Native States attached thereto. ... ( Chief Commissioner, Oudh. 

3. The BENOAL o^^--J-^^-^^:^ '"e Native j Lieutenan^.^overnor. 

4. The Assam P««^^'^^'^^^J^jh the Native States j ^^5^ Commissioner. 

5. The Central f«ov'^<=ES^ *^th the Native Stat.^ j ^y^ Commissioner. 

6. The British Burmah Province, with the Native ) ,.. . , ^ . . „ 

States attached thereto. ... ... 1 ^^"^ Commissioner. 

7. The Berars or Hyderabad Assigned Districts, j d„,.j.„, ii„j.„k,j ,^a ri.:-/ 

with Hyderabad (the Nizam's Terri- [ ^'"??^?i{^"±"'i,*^ "^'"•' 
tory) or the Deccan. ... ...) Commissioner, Berar. 

8. The Rajputana^Agency for the Native SUtes in j Covemor-General's Agent. 

9. The Central I^^^J^^^^g Yn^*^"' *' ^f'" ^""!* | Governor-General's Agent. 

3. The Presidency of Madras, 

embracing i Governorship. 

I Chief Commissionership. 
As follows, Tfiz. :— 

I. The Districts of the Presidency, in the country known ) 

as the Carnatic and Northern r ^ ^ ^ 
CiRCARS, with the Native States at- ( ^°^""'^'- 
tached thereto. ... ... ; 

2. * The Provinces of Mysore (Native State) and Coorg ...Chief Commissioner. 

4. The Presidency of Bombay, 

embracing i Governorship. 

As follows, idz. : — 

I. The Province of Sind, and the districts included in the ) 

Northern, Central and Southern f r/,^.*.r««r 
Divisions of the Presidency, with the ( ^--overnor. 
Native States attached thereto. . . . ) 



5. The French Territories. 

6. The Portuguese Territories. 



7. Outlying Independent States. 

Ocean Islands near the Malabar, Coromandel and Burmah Coasts. 

The Straits Settlements. 

Glossary of Indian Territorial Designations. 

Thermal Statistical Tables for various Stations in India and the East. 

Religions and Peoples of India. 



♦ Geographically, the Provinces of Mysore and Coor^ come within the limits of the Madras Presidency, they do not how- 
e«w, except in Military matters, appertain to that jurisdictionj the Chief Commissioner being indirect corre:^pondencc with the 
Supreme Government. The Provinces, arc here included within this Presidency for convenience of reference. 



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I. 
THE INDIAN EMPIRE 



OR 



INDIA, BRITISH AND FEUDATORY. 



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The Indian Empire: or India, British and Feudatory. 
GENERAL STATEMENTS. 



Position^ Coast-Line^ Area^ Population^ Ra^enue &*c. 

Between 8' and 35' North Latitude, i. e.y from Cape Comorin to extreme point of Hazara District in 
the Punjab Province, and 6f and icx)" East Longitude, 1. e,, from Kurrachee to extreme point of Tenasse- 
rim District in the British Burmah Province. 



Estimated } Popw^a^io" 242,427,646. 
usiimaied | Revenue Rs. 636,506,977. 



Estimated \ ^^^^ ^*"®* ^.185 English Miles. 
u.stimated | ^^^ 1,490. 335 Square Miles. 

Estimated Land Frontier Line | Exdul^e of { Kashmir, Sikkim and Manipur. •• 5»575 miles. 

Length, North and South from extreme point of Hazara District to Cape Comorin, ... 1,920 \\ 

Breadth, West and East from Kurrachee to extreme point of Lakhimpur District in Assam, 1,900 ,, 
^ Inclusive of Islands. 



Great Natural Divisions, 



The Himalayan Region on the North. 

Hindustan Proper, containing the basins of the Indus and the Ganges : the Great Desert, and the 

High Tract of Central India. 
The Deccan beyond the Vindhya Mountains, comprising the Valleys of the Nerbudda and Tapti, 

and a high Table land supported by the Eastern and Western Ghats. 
The Valley of the Brahmaputra and the Delta of the Ganges. 
The Provinces of the Eastern Coast and the Irrawady Delta. 



Length and Basin Areas of the Rivers of India, 



KlVBRS. 


Estimated 
Basin 


i 


Rivers. 


Estimated 
Basin 


1 


Othbr Basins. 


Estimated 




area. 


I 




area. 




Area. 




Sq. miles. 


miles. 




Sq. miles. 


miles. 




Sq. miles. 


Ganges 

Mndus 


391,100 


1514 


*Mahi 


15,500 


350 


•Thar Desert 


68700 


372,700 


1800 


Brahmani .. 


15,400 


410 


* West Coast 


41700 


Brahmapotra 


361,200 


1800 


Baitarani . . 


11,900 


345 


Arakan 


29700 


Irrawady . . 


150,800 


1060 


Subamrekha 


11,300 


3»7 


•Kattywar and Cutch 


27600 


Godavan 


II2,200 


898 


Vaiga 
*Sabarmati 


9,800 


130 


Orissa Coast 


22200 


Krishna .. 


94»5«> 


800 


9.500 


200 


Tenasserim Coast 


14200 


Tapti 


27,000 


441 


Palar 


6,300 


220 


Coromandel Coast 


10300 


Salwin 


62,700 


750 


•Western Banas 


6,300 


180 


PalikatLake 


6700 


Mahanadi .. 


43.800 
22,400 


520 
320 


South Ponnar 
Vellar 


6,200 
4,500 


245 


KolairLake 


3100 


•Loni 




*Nerbudda.. 


36.400 


601 


Vaipar 


3,900 




Total Area. 




Ponnar 


20,500 


355 


Tambaravari 


3,600 


80 


Basins of Bay of Bengal 


1,441,900 


Cauvery 


27,700 


472 


*Dhardar .. 


1,800 




•Indian Basins of the ) 
Arabian Sea- .. f 

Total Square miles 


629,600 


Sitang .. 


18.300 


230 










2,071,500 











British India — - 


1877-78, 










i 


|j 


Towns 








Land 




Administrations. 


Q 


1 


and 
Villages. 


Area. 


Population. 


Density 


Revenue. 


Date of Census. 










Sq. miles. 




persq.m 


Rs. 




Punjab 


10 


32 


34,5»9 
91,846 


»o4.973 


17,604,505 
30,776,442 


168 


18,875,159 


10th January 1868. 


North- Western Provinces and ) 
Oudh .. .. ] .. 


7 


IS 


81.777 


376 


40,198,652 


18th January 1872. 


4 


12 


24,870 


33.954 


11,220,232 


468 


11,628,422 


1st February 1869. 


Bengal 




9 


43 


171,069 


155.302 


60,357.141 


389 


36,019,049 
3.631.843 


April 1872. 


Assam 






Jii 


«7,940 


84,208 


4,129,972 


78 


February 1872. 






4 


«9 


34.139 


9.351.334 


X09 


6,202,123 


»5th January 1872. 
21st February 1872. 


Bombay 


. 


4 


34 


30.906 


I38!3i8 


16,109,144 
31,281,177 


129 


33,116,103 
34,893.966 


Madras 






21 


7.549 


226 




Ajraere and Merwara 




2 


I 
6 


2,711 
17,711 


396.331 
2,227,654 


126 


310,696 
6,028,429 


1st April 1876. 

7th November 1867. 


Mysore (Native State). 




3 


8 


35,026 


27,081 


^•Tll.1" 


187 


7,270,650 


14th November 1871 


Coorg 

British Burmah 






6 




2,000 


84 


300,000 


14th November 1871 




3 


16 


14,9x8 


87,456 


3.011,614 


35 


4,827,094 


15th August 1872. 


Grand Total .. 


46 


234 


5«9.7a9 


903.97 X 


191,679,170 


212 


203,212,086 





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The Indian Empire : or India, British and Feudatory.— Continued. 



British India — Other sources of Revenue^ 1877-78, 



Jurisdictions. 


Foresu. 


Excise. 


Customs. 


Salt. 


Opium. 


Stamps. 




Rs. 


Rs, 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Rs. 


India 


106,450 


194,320 


1,349,450 
11,869,000 


14,842,540 




234,720 


Bengal 


426,230 


6,867,890 


26,936,010 


64,328,810 


10,814,520 


Assam 


134,330 


1,625,660 


.... 


.... 




557,090 


North-WestemPro-) 
vinces and . . f 


800,150 


2,148,800 


.... 




.... 


3,783,420 


Oudh 


402,950 
683,710 


691.140 




.... 




1,011,150 


Punjab 


1.043,770 




.... 


.. .. 


2,741,620 


Central Provinces . . 


683,910 


1,472,400 






.. .. 


1,035,180 


British Burmah 


1,603,080 


1,760,780 


4,210,590 


117,670 


.... 


702,200 
4,892,210 


Madras 


404,340 
1,261,630 


4.710,690 


2,033,500 


11,421,860 


.... 


Bombay 


4,055,300 


6,760,420 


11,282,740 


27,498,410 


4,162,720 


Totals .. 


6,506,680 


24,570,750 


26,222,960 


64,600,820 


91,827,220 


29.934,830 



1877-78 — Population of British India classified according to Religious Denominations, 



Administrations. 


Christians. 


Hindus. 


Mahome- 
dans. 


Sikhs, 


Parsis, Bud- 
dhists and 
Jains. 


Aborigines 
and ouiers. 


Totals. 


Punjab 

N. W. Provinces and ) 

Oudh .. s 


32,131 


6,125,616 


9,334,472 


1,144,088 




978,198 


17,604,505 


21,626 


26,542,600 


4,186,913 




14,159 


11,144 


30,776,442 


*47,743 


9.971,236 


1,201,253 


.. .. 






11,220,232 


Bengal 


94,094 


38,843,179 


19,559,017 






i,8Jk),85i 


6j,357,i4i 


Assam 


2,075 


2,679,872 
6,518,137 


1,104,663 




.... 


343,363 


4,129,97a 


Central Provinces 


10,487 


340,965 




36,651 


2,444,994 


9,251,234 


Bombay 


107,901 


28',863l978 


3,840,954 


.. .. 


250,065 


614,637 


16,199,144 


Madras 


533,760 


1,857,857 


.... 


21,254 


4,328 


31,281,177 


Ajmere and Merwara 


715 


348,248 


168I283 






58 


396,331 


Berar 


841 


1,883,243 




6,604 


168,684 


2,227,654 


Mysore (Native State) 


25,676 


4.807,667 


208,991 




13,078 




5,055,412 


Coorg 


2,4x0 


128,197 


11,304 


i. .. 


.... 


36,401 


168,31a 


British Burmah 


36,301 


35,200 


101,452 




2,762,123 


76,538 


3,011,614 


Totals .. 


905,760 


139,132,759 


40,863,434 


1,144,088 


3,103,934 


6,539,195 


191,679,170 



* Includes 40,212 Soldiers and Prisoners, European and Native. 



Feudatory India — 1877-78, 



Locality. 


Native 
States 
and 
Chief, 
ships. 




Tribute. 


Military Forces, estimated. 




Area. 


Population. 


Revenue. 


Guns. 


Cavalry. 


Infantry. 


Punjab Province * . . 
North Western Provinces 
Bengal Province t . . 
Assam Province X .. 
Central Provinces .. 
Bombay Presidency 
Madras Presidency . . 
Rajputana Agency t . 
Central India Agency 
British Burmah Province § 
Nizam's Dominions 


35 
2 
32 
23 
15 
433 
5 

62 
3 

1 


Sq. miles. 

101,534 

5,125 

38,379 

28,835 
72,960 
9,745 

4,500 
98,000 


5,418,370 

657,000 

2,3i*,547 

206,452 

1,052,836 

8,954,590 

3,252,161 

9,667,710 

8,177,810 

50,000 

XI, 000,000 


Rs. 

16,011,030 

1,540,000 

2,025,583 

117,545 

44.596,467 
8,060,226 
29,680,500 
27,022,870 

60,000,000 


Rs. 

280,180 

105,895 

135,230 
1,035,033 
1,010,000 

1,246,531 
46,607 


28 
30 
575 

603 
720 


6,158 
500 

400 

13,734 

21 

33,325 

14,012 

6,000 


42,715 
2,000 

11,894 
4,400 

40,763 

2,12a 

61,350 

47,005 

34,000 


Totals .. 


630 


586,364 


50,748,476 


189,631,631 


3,859,476 


3,543 


63,050 


246,249 



'* Including Kashmir. 



t Including Sikkim. % Including Manipur. f Including Karennee. 

Digitized by VJ^\ 



lOgle 



1 1 



The Indian Empire : or India, 


British and Feudatory.— Continued. 


No. 


Indian Railways, including Branches. 


Miles 
open 


No. 


Indian Canals. 




Guaranteed Lines, 




I 


Circular Canal, Calcutta, Bengal 


I 


East Indian Railway 


1503 


2 


Hooghly and Dhappa Canal, Bengal. 


2 


Oudh and Rohilkhand Railway 


547 


3 


Calcutta and Eastern Canal, Bengal. 


3 


Eastern Bengal Railway 


172 


4 


Maugrah Canal to Jaipur on the Hooghly, 

Bengal. 
Rajmehal Canal, Behar, Bengal. 


4 


Sind, Punjab and Delhi Railway 




5 




Punjab Portion 553 m. 
Sind Portion 109 m. 


662 


6 
7 


Damoodah and Hooghly Canal, Bengal. 
Ganges Canal, North- Western Provinces. 


5 


Great Indian Peninsula Railway 


1268 


8 


Lower Ganges Canal, N. W. Provinces. 


6 


Madras Railway 


858 


9 


Eastern Jumna Canal, N. W. Provinces. 


7 


South Indian Railway 


612 


10 


Western Jumna Canal, Punjab. 


8 


Bombay, Baroda & Centra] India Railway 


422 


II 
12 


Sarda Canal, Oudh, North-Westem Provinces. 
Rohilkhand Canals, North-Westem Provinces. 




State Lines. 




13 


Orissa Canals, Orissa, Bengal. 


I 


Northern Bengal State Railway 


219 


14 


Gunduk Canals, Behar, Bengal. 


2 


Tirhoot State Railway 


82 


15 


Soane Canals, Behar, Bengal. 


3 


Calcutta and South Eastern St. Railway 


28 


16 


Kistna Canals, Madras Presidency. 


4 


Nulhati State Railway 


27 


17 


Godavari Canals, Madras Presidency. 


5 


Palna and Gya Stete Railway 


57 


18 


Sirhind Canals, Punjab. 


6 


Northern Punjab State Railway 


103 


19 


Bari Doab Canal, Punjab. 


7 


Indus Valley State Railway. . . 


501 


20 


Sutlej Canals, (Upper and Lower) Punjab. 


8 


Muttra and Hathras State Railway 


29 


21 


Bahawalpur Canals, Punjab. 


9 


Rajputana State Railway ... 


428 


22 


Sind Canals, West of the Indus, Punjab, 


lO 


Sindhia State Railway 


35 


23 


Sind Canals, East of the Indus, Punjab. 


II 


Holkar and Neemuch State Railway ... 


172 


24 


Tapti Canals, Bombay Presidency. 


12 


Baroda (Gaikhwar) Railway 


20 


25 


Agra Canal, North-Westem Provinces. 


13 


Khamgaon State Railway ... 
Amraoti State Railway 
Wardha Valley State Railway 


8 


26 


Dehra Dun Canals, N. W. Provinces. 


15 


6 

45 




Principal Mountain Ranges. 


16 


Dhond and Manmad State Railway 


H5 


I 


The Himalayan Range, North Frontier, India. 


17 


Nizam's State Railway 


121 


2 


The Suliman Range, West of the Indus. 


18 


Rangoon and Irrawaddy State Railway 


163 


3 


The Salt Range, Punjab. 


19 


Kohat and Rawalpindi under constructn. 




4 


The Halla Range, Sind, Bombay Presidency. 


20 


Kandahar State Railway ditto 




5 


The Aravalli Range, Rajputana. 


21 


Nusseerabad and Neemuch line ditto ... 




6 


The Vindhya Range, Central India. 


22 


Ajmere and Ahmedabad line ditto ... 


III 


7 


The Satpura Range, Central India. 


23 


Western Rajputana State Railway do. ... 




8 


The Mahadeo Range, Central Provinces. 


24 


Patri State Railway 


22 


9 
10 


The Sewalik Range, N. W. Provinces. 
The Garo, Khasi and Naga Range, Assam. 










Miles open in 1878-79. 


8366 


II 


The Eastem-Ghats, Madras Presidency. 

The Westem-Ghats, or Sahyadri Range, 
Bombay Presidency. 








12 








13 


The Nilgiri Hills, Madras Presidency. 




Note, For other details of the Indian 


Rail- 


14 


The Palni Hills, Madras Presidency. 




ways. Canals and Mountain Ranges, se 


e the 


15 


The Rajmehal Hills, Bengal. 




descriptive notes of each Province und< 


;r the 


16 


The Satmala or Ajanta Hills, Central India. 




item "Topography." 




17 
18 


The Khaimur Range, Central India. 
The Shervaroy Hills, Madras Presidency. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



II. 

The Bengal Presidency. 



1. 

THE PUNJAB PROVINCE: 

Comprising 10 Divisions or Commissionerships, embracing 32 Districts, 



WITH THE 



NATIVE STATES ATTACHED THERETO. 

Under a Lieutenant-Governor. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 

/ 



The Punjab Province. 



15 



1877-78. 

3 DISTRICTS. 



Latitude N. 
Longitude £, 
Height in feet 



!of Distrk 
to neares 



District capital 
nearest minute 



Dtsirici Statistics, 

Area, in Square Miles 
Number of Villages . . 
Population 

„ Per Square Mile 
Average Rainfall in inches 
Land Revenue . . . 



Rs. 



CltsssiJicatioH of Population. 

( Europeans 
Christians \ East Indians 

(Natives.. 
Sikhs 

Hindus . . 
Mahomedans 
Others .. 



Total 



DELHI DIVISION. 



Delhi. 




GURGAON. 



28" 37' 
77 4 



1,980 

1,264 

689,653 

348 

31 

70,6^,969 



Z28 

476,552 

212,934 



689,653 



Chief Towns 

with 
Population. 



c4 ^ ra & M 
Ml 3 C ? e 

SJS:7 « a § 

1 i^-^i i 

et K O 5 KA 

o £?"*-"•= ► 
3 X Q gi>^ S 



Karnal. 




5,609 

3,02Hf 

»909.43o 
340 

23 

25,72,826 



127 
1,501 
10,003 

.271,743 
495,302 
129,865 



1,909.430 



1877-78. 

3 DISTRICTS. 



HISSAR DIVISION. 



HiSSAR. 



Latitude N. | of District capital 
Longitude E.)^ "«*««'' ™""'<^ 
Height in feet 



District Statistics. 

Area in Square Miles 
Number of Villages . . 
Population 

„ Per Square Mile 
Average Rainfall in inches 
Land Revenue . . Rs. 



Classification of Population. 

(Europeans 
East Indians 
Natives . . 
Sikhs 

Hindus .. 
Mahomedans 
Oihera . . 



29 10 
75 46 



Chief Towns 

with 
Population. 



Total 



3i54o 

658 

484,681 

137 

21 
4,24,109 



9 
i,8ia 

376,833 

102,928 

2,986 



484,681 









"<2'i 




K j= ^- — 



ROHTAK. 



28* 54' 

76 38 
712 



1,809 

536,959 

295 

18 

8,82,696 



29 

9 
10 

456,229 
71,118 
9.307 



536,959 



Chief Towns 

with 
Population. 






1% 






Sirs A. 



29 32 

75 7 

702 



3,121 

654 

210,795 

68 

18 

1,75,692 



33 

21,525 

77,980 
82,120 
29,125 



210,795 



Chief Towns 

with 
Population. 



111 

III 

iii 

XtJS . 



8,470 
1,748 
1.232,435 
145 

14,82,497 



^: 



92 

104 

19 

23,594 

911,042 

256,166 

41,418 



1,232,435 



Digitized by 



Google 



16 



The Punjab Province^ — Continued. 



1877-78. 

3 DISTRICTS. 



Latitude N. | ^f District capital 
•. J f (to nearest minute 
Longitude £. ) 

Height in feet 

District Statistics. 

Area in Square Miles 

Number of Villages .. 

Population 

Per Square Mile .. 

Average Rainfall in incites . . 

Land Revenue c. R». 

Classification 0/ Populatioru 

{Europeans 
sEast Indians 
Natives 
Sikhs 

Hindus .. 
Mahomedans 
Others .. 



Total 



.1877-78. 
3 DISTRICTS. 



Latitude N. ) of District capital 
Longitude E.j'^"«^^^"*^"^^ 
Height in feet 

District Statistics. 

Area in Square Miles 

Number of Villages . . 

Population 

Per Square Mile 

Average Rainfall in inches 

Land Revenue . . Rs- 

Classification ff Po^leUion. 

{Europeans 
East Indians 
Natives 
Sikhs 

Hindus .. 
Mahomedans 
Others 

Total 




Digitized by 



Google 



The Punjab Province, — Continued. 



17 



1877.78. 
3 DISTRICTS. 



Latitude N. ) of District capital 
Longitude E. ) *° °««« ''^^^ 
Height in feet 



District Statistics, 

Area in Square Miles 

Number of Villages . . 

Population 

Per Square Mile ^ .. 

Average Rainfall in inches 

Land Revenue , . Rs. 



Ciassificaium of Population, 

(Europeans 
East Indians 
Natives.. 
Sikhs 
Hindus 
Mahomedans 
Others 



Total 



1877.78. 
3 DISTRICTS. 



Latitude N. 
Longitude 
Height in feet 






District capital 
nearest minute 



District Statistics, 

Area in Square Miles 

Number of Villages . . 

Population 

Per Square Mile 

Averaee Rainfall in inches 

Land Revenue 



Cltusification of Population, 

i Europeans 
Christians \ East Indians 

(Natives.. 
Sikhs 

Hindus .. .. 

Mahomedans 
Others 



Total 



AMRITSAR DIVISION. 



Amritsar. 



31' 37' 
74 55 

756 



x»56a 

« ''574 

832,750 

535 

7.8a,434 



358 
37 
X29 
223,219 
138,037 
377.135 
93,845 



832i75o 



Chief Towns 

with 
Population. 



Hi' 

m 
■5 \i 






GURDASPUR. 



3a' 3' 
75 27 



1,818 

1,880 

906,126 

496 

35 

10,44,330 



79.387 
303,107 
422,196 
xox,3i7 



9o6,x36 



Chief Towns 

with 
Population. 



O m2 SeScQ 



SlALKOT. 



3a 3X 
74 36 

829 



1,955 

a,3M 

X, 005,004 

510 

5X 

xo,98,989 



X.535 
62 

2X4 

50,279 
218,771 
601,959 
'32,184 



Chief Towns 

with 
Population. 






LAHORE DIVISION. 



Lahore 



31' 35' 

74 ax 

706 



3,659 

1,455 

789,266 

2X8 

22 

5,24,337 



2,292 

598 

98 

1x9,268 

X 16,287 

470,2x6 
80,907 



789,666 



Chief Towns 

with 
Population. 



mi 






3 I 

00 ' < 



3t 



Gujranwala. 



32 xo 
74 X4 



2,563 

1,202 

550,576 

207 

4,57,748 



»9 

85 

o 57 

38,9" 

104,156 

357,550 

49,858 



550,576 



Chief Towns 

with 
Population. 



km 

0-: s^a 



Ferozkporb. 



30*55' 

74 40 
645 



2,739 

312 

549,253 

204 

14 

5,05,229 



900 
xo 

24 
160,487 

68,^06 
245,659 

73,767 



549,253 



Chief Towns 

with 
Population. 



Li** rf a" 

" ^1 



5,335 

5,768 

2,743,880 

514 

39 

29,25,753 



2,002 
99 
353 
352,885 
659,905 
1,401,290 
327,346 



2,743,880 






5: 



8,961 

1,889,495 
211 

i4,87,3«4 



3,2XX 

633 

179 

318,666 

288,849 

1,073,425 

204,533 



1,889,495 



Digitized by 



Google 



i8 



The Punjab Province, — Continued. 



1877-78 

4 DISTRICTS. 



Latitude N. 
Longitude E, 
Height in feet 



(of District capital 
to nearest minute 



District Statistics 

Area in Square Miles 
Number of Villages . . 
Population 

„ Per Souare Mile 
Average Rainfall in inches 
Land Revenue Rs. 



Chusificmticn, of Population, 

{Europeans 
East Indians 
Natives 
Sikhs 

Hindus .. 
Mahomedans 
Others .. 



Total 



1877-78 
4 DISTRICTS. 



Latitude N. 
Longitud 
Height in feet 



) of District cap 
^^ £ I tonearestmin 



District Station* 

Area in Square Miles 
Number of Villages . . 
Population 

,, Per Square Mile 
Average Rainfall in inches 
Land Revenue . . Rs. 



ClassiJicaHon of Population, 

{Europeans 
East Indians 
Natives 
Sikhs 

Hindus .. 
Mahomedans 
Others 



Total 



RAWALPINDI DIVISION. 



Rawalpindi. 



33 37 
73 6 
»t709 



6,318 

1,658 

711,256 

6,85,916 



2,07a 

a4,355 

60,720 

621,169 

a.8i5 



711,256 



Chief 
Towns 

with 
Popln. 






111 



Jhelum. 



3a 55 

73 47 

827 



500,988 

128 

20 

5,81,785 



42 

16 

13.865 

49i"i 

434, » 57 

3,794 



500,988 



Chief 
Towns 

with 
Popln. 



-ii 
III 

9 III, 



MOOLTAN. 



30 12' 

71 31 

40a 



5,9«7 

z,aii 

471.563 

80 

6 

5,18,578 



910 

252 

72 

909 

87.000 

360,188 

22,223 



471,563 



Chief 
Towns 
with 
Pophi. 



3 ^ ^ 

i|i 
III 

g-il 
2§| 

.-3* 

111 I' 





JifANG. 


31- 


16' 


1 

Chief 


7a 


22 


Towns 

with 

Popln. I 



5.702 

786 

348,017 

61 

5 
2,83,07a 



»3 

5 

2,994 

57,297 

270,819 

16,899 



w 

o|§rt 
5II § 



2^: 



348,027 



-•o 



" .0 & 

«•« 




MOOLTAN DIVISION. 



E 359,437 



Digitized by 



Google 



/ 



The Punjab Province,— Continued. 



19 



X877-78 

3 DISTRICTS. 



Latitude N. | of District capital 
Longitude eJ'°°««^'"*^"'« 
Height in feet 



District Statistics. 

Area in Square Miles 
Number of Villages . . 
Population 

„ Per Sauare Mile 
Average Rainfall in inches 
Land Revenue 



Rs. 



CtassificaHon of PopulaHon. 

{Europeans 
East Indians 
Natives.. 
Sikhs 

Hindus .. 
Mahomedans 
Others 



Total 



X877-78 
3 DISTRICTS. 



Latitude N, 
Longitud< 
Height in feet 



NOof 



District capita] 
nearest minute 



DERAJAT DIVISION. 



Dera Ismail Khan. 



31-51' 
70 56 

sn 



716 

394,864 

zo 
3,oa,5i9 



District Statistics. 

Area in Square Miles 
Number of Villages . . 
Population 

„ Per Square Mile 
Average Rainfall in inch« 
Land Revenue . . R&. 



Classi/icatioH 0/ Population. 

{Europeans 
East Indians 
Natives.. 
Sikhs 

Hindus .. 
Mahomedans 
Others . . 



Total 



X69 

3" 

33 

X.587 

48,756 

338,387 

5,901 



394,864 



Chief Towns 

with 
Population 



I'll 






Dera Ghazi Khan. 



30- 4 
70 49 
395 



4,740 

354 

308,840 

118 

XI 

3,47,368 



I,X24 

38,467 

a64,537 
4,656 



308,840 



ChiefTowns 

with 
Population. 



c art-so 



'^5 Hi 



Bannu. 



33- d 
70 39 
1,276 



3,371 

625 

287,547 
91 

12 
3,88,389 



27 

xs 

4 

S0,322 

260,550 

240 



287,547 



ChiefTowns 

with 
Population, 



D :3 - --^ 



3-' - V 






PESHAWAR DIVISION. 



Peshawar. 







KOHAT. 



33- 36' 

71 29 

1,767 



2,839 

1,251 

>45,4i9 

52 

23 

86,0x5 



53 
7 

»,837 

6,544 

136,565 

4' 3 



145,419 



Chief Towns 

with 
Population 



3ll| 






15,007 

",695 

991,251 

66 

XI 

10,38,266 



950 

52 

39 

3,204 

"3,445 

863,464 

10,797 



991,251 



> 




3,468 

32 

26 

4,824 

52,515 

964,124 

10,800 



1,035,789 



\ 



Digitized by 



Google 



20 



The Punjab Province, — Continued. 

List of the Native Feudatory States or Foreign Territory , included in the Province^ and 
Subordinate to the Punjab Government, 







Estimatbd. 








FORCKS. 


Of the Capital. 






i97T^B 








Position 












Under 


6 


















^ 


States and 
Chibfships. 


Popula- 
tion. 


Revenue. 


Arba. 


of 
Chief. Tril 


}ute. 


i 


1 


f 


|. 


* "T 


i 


what 
Officers. 








Rs. 


Sq.ms. 


I 


[iT 








• / 


feet. 




X 
2 


*Jnmmooand .. \ 
Kashmir .. f 

;P»^ ) Phulkian 


x»534.97o 
1,586,000 


55,75,780 

45,66,770 
4,o4,a8o 


64,000 
5,419 


Maban^a. 
do. 




160 
109 


1400 
2750 


35,600 •[ 

4,600 


30-30 


74-55 
76-27 


5,363 




3 


Mind • ctJ»-I^ 
•Vabha/ States 


X90.475 


1,259 


Raja. 


. 


10 


300 


1,600 


39-19 


76-31 


734 


4 


a»6,i55 


6,50,000 


928 


da 




33 


560 


1,250 


30-33 


76-13 




5 


tBahawalpur 


500,000 


16,00,000 


17,285 


Nawab. 




13 


300 


x,5oo 


39-34 


7X-47 


375 


6 


tChamba .. 


130,000 


2 07,000 


3,092 


Raja. 


5,000 


4 




160 


32-34 


76-9 


033 


I 


^Kaporthala 


a58,37o 


9.50,000 


598 


do. 1,3 


1,000 


15 


iis 


I,300 


31-33 


75-25 


,, 


^Mandi 


145,950 


3,70,000 


1,125 


da 1,0 


3,000 


3 




1,650 


31-42 


76.58 


2991 


9 
xo 


^Suket 
IFaridkot 


41,000 
68,000 


73,800 
3,00,000 


l?l 


da 1 
da 


[,000 


"i 


40 
300 


^ 


3X-32 
30-40 


76-56 
74-48 


2955 
709 


XI 


**Pataudi . . 


21,000 


80,000 


89 


Nawab. 


, 


40 


lOO 


28-18 


76-50 




» 4~4-»(p««»$ ^ 


xa 
>3 


ttLohara .. 
ttDujana .. 


20,000 
27,000 


57,000 
65,000 


da 
da 


• 


11 


55 


180 
130 


28-26 
28-41 


76-41 


.. 


11 


MalerKotla 

Kalsia 

Surmur (Nahan) .. 


01,650 
69,000 


2,59,000 
1,56,000 


X69 


da 
Sardar. 




5 
3 


130 
50 


m 


32-30 


75-55 




90,000 


2,10,000 


z,045 




10 


100 


530 








X7 


Kahlur (Bilaspur).. 


60,000 


1,00,000 


448 


J,ooo 


30 




880 








x8 


Bashahr(Rampur).. 
Hindnr /Nalagarh) 


90,000 


50,000 


3,257 


da 


3,950 


,, 




100 


v 






>9 


70,000 


90,000 


249 


do. 


5,000 


4 


135 


500 


«5 






ao 


KeonthalCJulung).. 


50,000 


60,000 


112 


da 




3 




100 








31 


Baghal .. .. 


22,000 


60,000 


X24 


da 


2,000 


I 


30 


300 






32 

as 

24 


Baehat 
Jubbal 
Kumharsain 


X0,090 
40,000 
10,000 


8,000 
30,000 
10,000 


60 
257 

94 


Rana. 
da 
da 


3,600 
2,530 
2,000 




•• 


65 




i 


II 


Bhajji 

Mailog (Pata) .. 


i9,oo<^ 
9,000 


23,000 
xo,ooo 


94 
53 


da 
Thakur. 


1,440 

i!o8o 




•• 


xoo 
75 


1 f 




Q 


11 


Balkan (Ghodna) .. 


6,000 


7,000 
8,000 


50 


Rana. 




,, 


50 


x S 




Dhami 


5,500 


29 


do. 


360 






100 




a 


29 


Kuthar 




4,000 


5,000 


19 


da 


i,S8o 




,, 


SO 


9 w« 




■ 1 


30 


Kunhiar . 




2,500 


4,000 


9 


Thakur. 


i8o 






30 




3« 


Mangal 




800 


700 


13 


Rana. 


iJS 




,, 


25 


w 




•3 


32 


Bija 




800 


1,000 


6 


Thakur. 






30 


•s § 




§ 


33 


Darkuti 


,, 


700 


600 


4 


Rana. 








15 


J5 




34 


Tarhoch . 




xo,ooo 


6,000 


75 


Thakur. 


'280 






83 




.2 


35 


Sangri 




700 


1,000 


i6 


Mian 






.. 


xo 




•a 


a. 


Ratesh "] 


,, 


300 


200 


3 


Thakur. 


^ 




,, 






8 


6. 


Thepg 


,, 


3,000 


6,000 


29 


da 






,, 






=3 ■" 




1 


c. 


Koti 


, Under 
"Keonthal 


2,500 


43 


da 


, 




,, 








d. 


Gund 
Madhan 


x,ooo 
x,ooo 


x,ooo 
x,6oo 


II 

20 


da 
da 
















/. 


Khairi 










da 




.. 




^ 




J 11 






g- 


Pandur / 


•• 


•• 


•• 


da 


• 






• 










Total 


5,4x8,370 


160,11,030 


101,534 


2,a 


0,180 


400 


6158 


42,7x5 




w 





Remark.— The relations of Kashmir and Bahawalpur with the British Government are r^ulated by treaties, those 
of Patiala, Jind and Nabha by Sanads or rescripts of the Governor General. Kashmir pays an annual tribute of shawls and 
shawl-goats ; Patiala, Jind and Nabha furnish a quota of horsemen for general duty in British territory. These chiefs, differ 
from the remaining feudatories in the fact that they have been granted full powers of life and death over their subjects. The 
total tribute paid by the above Feudatory Sutes, amounts to about ;C28,ooo per annum. 
The above Principalities are arranged in the following Geographical Groups, as a key to their position : — 



Trans SutUi Highlands. 
Jummoo and Kashmir. 
Chamba. 
Mandi. 
Suket. 



Cis SuiUj Highlands, 

/'Hindur (Nalagarh.) 
• bal. 
ilur (Bilaspur.) 
ala. 
Sirmur (Nahan.) 



6 ^ Jubbal. 
go -(Kahlur 
d5 Patiala. 



Cis Sutlej Highlands, (contd.) 
i^Balsan (Ghodna.) 






Basi, in Kalsia. 
Bawal, in Nabha. 
Bhadaur, in Patiala. 
Bhimbar, in Kashmir. 
Btlan>ur, in Kahlur. 
Chacnrauli, in Kalsia. 



DarkutL 

Gund. 

Keonthal (Julung.) 

KotL 

Madhan. 

Pandur. 

Raiengarh. 

Tarhoch. 
^Theog. 
West /'Baghat. 
Centl. -< Bija. 
Group. vDhamL 

Other Chief Towns of above States — 

Chini^ in Bashahr. 
Dadn^ in Jind. 
Gilghit, in Kashmir. 
Gulmaiii;, Plateau in Kashmir. 
Kanti, m Nabha. 
Kishtwar, in Kashmir. 



Cis Sutlej Highlands^ (contd.) 



West /Kunhiar. 
Centl. < Kuthar. 
Group. iMailog (Pata.) 
/BaghsU. 

as Bashahr (Rampur.) 

g a: Bhajji. 

a gj Kanuti. 

SJ « 1 Kotgarh. 

op I Kumharsain. 

^ Mangal 
V^Sangri. 



Kot Kapura, in Faridkot. 
Ladakh, Province of Kashmir. 
Leh, in Kashmir. 
Nahan, in Sirmur. 
Nalagarh, in Hindur. 
Namaul, in Patiala. 



Sirhind Plain. 

Bahawalptu*. 

Dujana. 

Faridkot. 

Jind^ in detached parts. .- 

Kalsia, ditto. 

Kapurthala. 

Loharu. 

Maler Kotla. 

Nabha, in detached parts. 

PataucU. 

Patiala (plain territory.) 



Phagwara, in Kapurthala. 
Punch, in Kashmir. 
Rajpura, in Patiala. 
Rampur, in Bashahr. 
SangTur, in Jind. 
Srinagar, capital Kashmir. 



Digitized by VJ^^V iC 



21 



The Punjab Province, — Continued. 

Military Divisions^ Districts and Stations, 



■ — 








Lat 


Long. 




g 








Lat. 


Long. 






u 




^ 


N 


E 


^ 




i^ 






N. 


E. 


4i 


g 


1 


Stations. 


'i 






.1 


c u 

p 


1 

2 


Stations. 


i 

■3 






•s, 


5 


To the near- 
est minute. 


To the near- 
est minute. 


1 






In: 


• ' 


e / 


Feet. 








In: 


• ' 


/ 


Feet. 




1 


Umballa (Head Quarters) 


43 


30-31 


76-52 


90a 




I 


Lahore (Meean Meer), 












a 


Kasauli .. 


73 


30-53 


77- I 


6,173 


jj 




Head Quarters. 


25 


31-31 


74-25 


709 


d 

as 


3 


Dagshai 


70 


30-53 


77-6 


6,100 


> 


3 


Mooltan 


7 


30-12 


71-31 


^1 


4 


Simla (Army Head Qrs.) 


69 


31-6 


77-13 


7,084 


Q 


3 


Ferozepore . . 


33 


30-55 


74-40 


It 


s 


Jutogh 
Subathu 


69 


31-6 


77- 9 


6,370 


u 


4 


Amntsar (Govindgarh) . . 


26 


31-37 


7f55 


756 


« 


6 


70 


30-58 


77- 3 


4,253 




S 


Kangra 


141 


32- 5 


76-18 


2,419 
4,058 


00 


I 


Lndhiana 


27 


30-55 


75-54 


806 


X 


6 


Bhagsu 


130 


32-12 


76-22 




Phillour .. 


36 


31- I 


75-50 




< 


7 


Dharmsala . . 


123 


32-16 


76-23 


6,111 




9 


Jullundur . . 


3X 


31-20 


75-37 


900 




8 
9 


Bakloh 
Dalhousie . . 


86 
86 


32-15 
32-32 


75-58 
75-59 


4,584 
6,740 




I 


Rawalpmdi, (Head Qrs.) 


34 


33-37 


73- 6 


1,709 


i 


I 


Peshawar (Head Quarters) 


17 


34- I 


71-37 


1,16s 




3 


Murree 


S7 


33-55 


73-27 


7,518 


Q 


3 


Shabkadar .. 




34-13 


71-36 






3 


Jhclum 
Campbellpcnre 


32 


32-55 


73-47 


827 


at 


3 


Michni 




34-11 


71-29 


.. 


^ 


4 


.. 


33-45 


72-24 




< 


4 


Abazai 




34-19 


71-37 


• • 


as 


s 


Attock 




33-53 


72-17 


1,193 


5 


Mackeson . . 




33-46 


71-36 


.. 


c: 


6 


Talagang . . 


IS 


32-56 


72-27 


1,530 


s 


6 


Nowshera . . 


.. 


34- 


72- 2 




< 


J 


Sialkot 


37 


32-30 


74-35 


829 


^ 


7 


Cherat 




33-50 


73- I 


4,497 


^ 


Kuldanah ^ ..<« i-p 
Kalabagh UjiSl 
Bara Gully V^ fi^ftJ 
Khaira Gully o^-^"^ 
ChunglaGullyJ^S**^^ 










^ 














< 


Q 
























lO 


























II 










i 


I 


Abbottabad (Head Qrs.). 


47 


34- 9 


73-15 


4,166 




13 










3 


Mardan 




34-" 


72-6 





















3 


Kohat 


18 


33-36 


71-29 


1,767 
















«fc 


4 


Edwardesabad 


II 


33- 


70-39 


1,276 


















5 


Dera Ismail Khan 


10 


31-51 


70-56 


571 
















6 


Dera Ghazi Khan 


6 


30- 4 


70-49 


395 
















f^';- 


7 


Rajanpur 


4 


29- 6 


70-22 


305 
















♦ s 


8 


Mangrotha .. 




30-43 


70-37 








* Under the orders of the 










b 


9 


Bahadur Khel 




33-10 


70-59 








Punjab Government 












10 


Quetta, Baluchistan . . 




30- 6 


66-56 


5,604 



Punjab Frontier Tribes, 



Locality. 



Tribe. 



Race. 



No. 

of fighting 

men. 



Adjoining 
Adjoining 



Hazara .. 



Peshawar 



i 



Adj<nmng Kohat and Peshawar 
Adjoining 



Kohat, Bannu and Dera Is-j 
mail Khan . . . . "^ 



Adjoining Dera Ismail Khan 



Adjoining Dera Ghazi Khan 



■■{ 



Hassanzais 

Taduiis .. 
Bonerwals 
Swatis 
Ranizais .. 
Othman Khels 
Mohmands 

Afridis . .. 
Bezotis . . 

Sipahs ^ . . 
Orakzais.. 
Zaimusht Afghans 
Turis 
Waziris .. 

Ushtaranas 
Kasranis 
Bozdars .. 

Khetrans 
Khosali^ .. 
Logharis .. 
Gurchanis 
Marris 
Bugtis .. 



- Pathans . 



}Pathans and Swatis dependent 
on Swat 

Pathans, dependent on Cabul . . 



>■ Pathans 



■Baluchis 
Pathans 

-Baluchis 






8,000 

30,000 
13,000 

so,ooo 

30,000 



5,000 
3,000 

13,000 



Total 



^gle 



For further information regarding these tribes, and Afghan Ethnology in general, see Mr. APJIi^l^^y^ ^tpln^i 
wider " Afghanistan,** in ♦' OuUying Independent States." 



22 The Punjab Province, — Continued. 

BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

AreUy Position^ BoundarieSy &c. 

The territories under the Government of the Punjab include all the country from 
the river Jumna on the east, to the Suleman mountains on the west, and from Kashmir 
and the Swat country on the North, to Rajputana and Sind on the South. This extensive 
Province, one of the most important in India, is situated between 27* 30' and 35* o' North 
Latitude, and 69' o' to 79* o' East Longitude, the extreme length being about 800 miles 
and extreme width about 650 miles. The area of the British possessions within these 
limits is 104,973 square miles, that of the native dependencies about 101,534 square 
miles, the total area being about 206,507 square miles, of which less than one-third are 
cultivated, one-fourth culturable and the remainder unculturable waste. The Punjab west 
of the river Bias was annexed in March 1849, o^ the close of the second Sikh war. The 
Jullundur Doab and the hill district of Kangra, were ceded in March 1846 after the first 
Sikh war. The country east of the river Sutlej, formerly designated the Cis Sutlej States, 
and including the territory on the left bank of the Sutlej, was annexed in December 1845, 
the lapsed estates being brought under British administration in January 1847, and the 
hill district of Simla being acquired after the Gurkha war of 181 4-1 6. The Delhi 
territory, west of the river Jumna was transferred from the North-Westem Provinces in 
February 1858. 

Topography, &c. 

Punjab Proper is so called from two Persian words signifying * five waters' in refer- 
ence to the five great rivers which flow through it With respect to the propriety of the 
designation, it is however to be observed, that there are in fact six rivers, the InduSy the 
Jhduniy the Chenaby the Raviy the Bias and the Sutlejy but as the Bias has a much 
shorter course than the others, it seems to have been disregarded when the name of the 
country was bestowed. In this description the whole country lying within the Lieute- 
nant-Governor's jurisdiction, is designated as " The Punjab Province." 

The northern and southern parts of the Punjab Province differ very greatly in phy- 
sical features. On the north-east runs the western portion of the great northern moun- 
tain barrier of our Indian empire known as the Himalayas or Himaleh, consisting not of 
one but of a vast series of ranges and valleys separating the upper basins of the large 
rivers, from the Jumna on the east to the Indus on the west, and skirted on the southern 
side by the lower or subordinate ranges known as the Sewaliks and Salt Range. The 
North-West portion is also very mountainous, the hills beyond the Indus forming a series 
almost like a continuation of the Himalayas, and connecting with the Suleman range 
which forms the western boundary of the province for some 300 or 400 miles. The 
Salt Range runs east and west between the Jhelum and the Indus. The southern face of 
this range is for the most part abrupt and precipitous, and the highest point on it is 
Sakesar 4,994 feet On the west of the river Indus the range is continued until it meets 
the Suleman Range, and the name then changes to that of the Kalabagh hills. 

The plains of the country may be described as vast expanses of alluvial clay and 
loam intersected by the great rivers of the province of which the Indus is the chief, (see 
also Bombay Presidency). The great rivers from which the Punjab Proper takes its name, 
form natural divisions of a large portion of the country, known here as the Doabs, These 
divisions stretch south-west between the rivers with a regularity unbroken by any eminence 
of importance, and decline imperceptibly from about 1,600 feet above sea level to about 
200 feet at the junction of the united streams with the Indus. The long and narrow strip 
between the Suleman range and the Indus is known as the Dcrajat (Upper and Lower); the 



The Punjab Province, — Continued. 23 

country lying between the Indus and the Jhelum, is the Sind Sagar Doab; that between 
the Jhelum and the Chenab, xki^Jach or Chaj Doab; that between the Chenab and the 
Ravi, the Rechna Doab; that between the Ravi and the Bias, the Bari Doab ; and that 
between the Bias and the Sutlej, xht fulluruiur Doab, Of these Doabs the Sind Sagar is 
the most extensive, while that of the Bari is by far the most populous as well as the most 
important, containing as it does the three great cities of Lahore, Amritsar and Mooltan. 
These Doabs have some features in common ; in the submontane portions vegetation is 
most luxuriant ; in the vicinity of the rivers the tracts are enriched by their alluvial soil and 
fertilised by inundation, while as the higher central parts are approached, uncultivated 
land, covered with low brush-wood and reed grass, is met with, affording boundless graz- 
ing grounds for camels, cattle, sheep and goats. Towards the lower extremities of the 
large rivers, as they approach each other, the country becomes nearly level, in which, 
owing to the extremely scanty rainfall, cultivation is maintained by means of numerous 
small canals or irrigation channels, which intersect the country in every direction. 

In consequence of the nearly unbroken flatness of the surface, the great rivers 
frequently change their courses in an extraordinary degree. The Sutlej which formerly 
ran close to the town of Ludhiana, is now several miles to the northward ; the Ravi 
which once washed the walls of the city of Lahore, runs in a channel three or four 
miles off to the northward ; the Chenab which ten or twelve years ago ran close to the 
town of Ramnagar, is now four or fivt miles distant, and the same applies to the 
Jhelum. So the Ghara at no great distance of time held for above 200 miles a course 
considerably westward of the present and parallel to it. 

The Sutlej, the most eastern of the large rivers above named, rising in Thibet, unites 
with the Bias at Hariki, a few miles from the village of Sobraon, the scene of our great 
battle with the Sikhs, the united stream for about 300 miles to the confluence with the 
Chenab, is then called the Ghara, The Chenab meets the Jhelum near Jhang, and the Ravi 
near Sirai Sidhu ; this stream then loses the name of Chenab and takes the name of 
Trimaby or * three waters' for a further distance of no miles to the junction with the Ghara 
at Madwala ; from this point to the confluence with the Indus near Mithankot, a further 
distance of about 60 miles, the single stream of these united waters bears the name of 
Punjnady or * five streams.' These nuble streams, besides affording means of inland 
navigation scarcely equalled, are of inestimable value for the purposes of irrigation. 

Amongst the minor rivers of the province, are the Cabul and Swat rivers in the 
Peshawar valley, the Kuram and Luni in Upper Derajat, the Sohan near Rawalpindi and 
the Markanda and Ghagar in the Umballa District, the two last-named losing themselves 
in the Bickaneer desert 

The country lying between the Sutlej and the Jumna is not properly part of the 
Punjab Proper. It includes in the upper part, the Cis Sutlej states, and in the lower, the 
Delhi territory. The hills in this latter portion of the province appear to be spurs or 
offshoots of the end of the Aravalli range, the principal being the hills in the Delhi and 
Gurgaon districts. 

The means of communication in the Punjab include rivers and canals, ordinary roads 
and railroads. The water communication is about 2,500 miles ; the length of made roads 
about 25,000 miles, and the length of Railway lines open for traffic at the present time is 
about 1,080 miles. Of the Railway lines there are four within the limits of the province, 
viz : the Sitidy Punjab and Delhi Railway ^ open for traffic ; the Punjab Northern State 
Railway open up to Jhelum, the extension to Rawalpindi being under construction and 
which will be very shortly opened for traffic ; the Indus Valley State Railway from Mooltan 
viSi Bahawalpur to Rohri, open for traffic ; and a small section of the Rajputana State 
Railway firom Delhi to Rewari, with a branch to Faraknagar, also open for'iramb/" Branch 



24 The Punjab Province, — Continued. 

feeders to these lines, viz., from Ludhiana to Ferozepore, from Amritsar to Shahpur, -from 
Jullundur to Hoshiarpur, from Umballa to Kalka, from Raiwind to Kasur, from Wazirabad 
to Jummoo viA Sialkot, and from Wazirabad to the Salt Range, are in contemplation. Among 
the principal of the various canals which run through the province are, the Bari Doab 
Canal, the Western Jumna Canal, the Sirhind Canal, the upper and lower Sutlej Canals, 
and the Delhi and Gurgaon irrigation works. Of these the Bari Doab Canal is the most 
important ; leaving the Ravi at Madhopur where the river debouches irom the lowest 
of the Himalayan ranges, the main line 247 miles in length, after throwing off branches 
to Lahore, Kasur and Sobraon, passes through Amritsar, and crossing the Sind Punjab 
and Delhi Railway at Changamunga station, again empties itself into the Ravi In 
addition to the main line, 247 miles, the Kasur branch, 84 miles, the Sobraon branch 
61 miles, and the Lahore branch 74 miles, make up an aggregate length of 466 miles. 
The main line of the Sirhind canal leaves the Sutlej at Rupar. 

Climate and Sanataria. 

The climate of the Punjab is characterized by much drought, and as compared with 
that of the rest of Northern India is more given to extremes, the heat being intense in 
the summer months owing to the general scantiness of the rain-fall, (except in the sub- 
Himalayan districts), and the cold great during the cold season which lasts longer than 
that of countries farther south. The hot season begins about the middle of April, and the 
heat is almost intolerable from that time till August, being greater than elsewhere in India, 
Frequent dust-storms then occur, and on calm days spiral columns of dust arise and 
travel onward, whirling round continually for one or two miles before subsiding. In 
September the heat moderates, October is temperate and agreeable, and from November 
to April it is cold, and frosts occur at night. The rain-fall throughout the province 
chiefly occurs in July and August, but a considerable amount of rain falls in the winter 
and early spring months, especially in the northern and western districts. At the hill 
stations the rain-fall is considerably heavier than in the plains. The following are the 
Sanataria of the Punjab province, they are 15 in number, viz : — Murree in district Rawal- 
pindi, height 7,518 feet; Cherat in district Peshawar, height 4,497 feet; Saktsar in 
district Jhelum, height 4,994 feet ; Dalhousie, height 6,740 feet, and Baklok, height 4,584 
feet, in district Gurdaspur; Bhagsu, height 4,058 feet, and Dharmsala, height 6,111 feet, 
in district Kangra; Simla, height 7,084 feet, Kasauli, height 6,173 ^^^^ Dagshai, height 
6,100 feet, Subathu, height 4*253 feet, Jutogh, height 6,370 feet, Solon, height 5,165 feet, 
and Sanawar, height 5,750 feet, all in district Simla; and Sheik Budin, height 4,516 feet, 
in district Dera Ismail Khan. See also list of Punjab Military Stations. 

Staples and Manufactures. 

The crops chiefly grown in the Punjab are, in the spring harvest, wheat, barley, 
pulses, oilseeds, vegetables, tobacco and poppy, and in the autumn harvest, millets, 
maize, rice, cotton, sugar-cane, pulses, oilseeds, vegetables and indigo. The cultivation of 
tea is almost exclusively confined to the Kangra valley, in which there are about thirty 
plantations. Of the mineral products of the Punjab, the most important is the rock 
salt found in the hills of the Salt Range, and Kankar, which consists of irregularly shap- 
ed pieces of calcareous concrete, abounds in most districts. It forms the chief material 
for road-making, and also yields when burnt, an excellent lime for mortar. Alum is pro- 
duced in large quantities at Kalabagh on the Indus in the Bannu district Coarse wools 
are produced in several of the plain districts, and of a better description in the hills, but 
the finer kinds of wool used in the manufactures of the principal towns, are chiefly obtained 
from countries beyond the frontier. The cultivation of silk has been attempted in a few 
places, but without any great success as yet. Digitized by vj^^^^ic 



The Punjab Province, — Continued. 25 

Agriculture is the chief occupation of the people, but the manufacturing industry is 
very considerable and important, silk and cotton goods are extensively made in most of the 
large towns, — the silks of Mooltan, Amritsur, Lahore, Shujabad and Leia being noted in the 
Indian markets,— carpets, brocades, cutlery and arms are also extensively manufactured. 

Form of Administration. 

On the annexation of the Punjab in March 1849, ^ Board of Administration for its 
affairs was constituted, to which the Commissioners of the Trans and Cis Sutlej States 
were also made subordinate. The Board was abolished in February 1853, and its powers 
and functions were vested in a Chief Commissioner, subordinate to whom a Judicial 
Commissioner and a Financial Commissioner were appointed. After the transfer of the 
Delhi territory from the North-Westem Provinces, the Punjab and its dependencies were 
constituted a Lieutenant-Governorship from the ist January 1859 ; Sir John Lawrence 
who had been hitherto the Chief Commissioner, being appointed the first Lieutenant- 
Governor. 

In 1866 a Chief Court, consisting of two judges, a barrister and a civilian, was 
substituted for the Judicial Commissioner, and which was constituted the final Appellate 
authority in criminal and civil cases, with powers also of original criminal jurisdiction in 
cases of European British subjects charged with serious offences. In 1869 a third 
judge, a civilian, was added to this court, 

For administrative purposes the Punjab Province is divided into ten divisions, with 
an average area of 10,567 square miles, each under the control of a Commissioner. These 
ten divisions comprise thirty-two districts, with an average area of 3,300 square miles, 
each under the control of a Deputy Commissioner, and these districts are again 
sub-divided into 132 tahsiPsy or revenue and judicial sub-divisions of districts, with an 
average area of about 800 square miles, under Tahsildars or sub-divisional officers. 

Census. 

On the loth of January 1868, a Census of the British possessions under the 
Government of the Punjab, was taken, which showed a total population of 17,604,505 
souls. At the beginning of 1855 the total population was estimated at not less than 
14,668,287 inhabitants, the increase in 13 years amounting to nearly three millions. No 
later census has been taken, but presuming that the population has increased in the same 
ratio during the past eleven years, (/>., from the date of the last census) as it did in the 
13 years preceding, it may be roughly calculated that the population of the province at 
the end of 1878 amounted in round numbers to 20,143,000 souls. The proportion of 
females to males is a little less than half. The average population per square mile for 
the whole province was 168 in 1868. Of the total population the agricultural classes 
compose 55 per cent, non-agricultural 45 per cent The whole population of the British 
portion of the Punjab has been classified as follows:— 9,334,472 Mahomedans; 6,125,616 
Hindus; 1,144,088 Sikhs; 978,198 Aborigines and others, and 22,131 Christians, 
European, East-Indian, and Native. 



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II. 

The Bengal Presidency. 



THEN.W. PROVINCES & OUDH 

Comprising 11 Divisions or Commissionerships, embraeing 47 Districts, 



WITH THE 



NATIVE STATES ATTACHED THERETO. 

Under a Lieutenant-Governor and Chief Commissioner. 



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29 



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1 

^ i 
•I 1 



I 



a 

^ 






3 



•SIViOX NOISIAIQ 



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36 The North-Western ProuinceSy — Continued. 

BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

Area, Position, Boundaries, &c. 
The territories under the jurisdiction of the Lieutenant-Governor of the North- 
western Provinces lie between the parallels of 23' 51' and 31'' 5' North, and 77" 4' and 
84* 43' East Longitude. Inclusive of the territory of Native Feudatory States within the 
jurisdiction, estimated at 5,125 square miles, they comprise a total area of 86,902 square 
miles. These provinces are bounded on the North by a part of the Punjab hill state of 
Bashahr, Chinese Thibet, Oudh (now included in the N.-W. P.) and Nepal; on the South 
by the Chota Nagpore Division of Bengal, the Rewah State, the Native States of Bundel- 
khand and the Saugor Division of the Central Provinces ; on the East by the Behar Pro- 
vince of Bengal ; and on the West by the Native States of Gwalior, Dholpur and Bhurt- 
pore of the Central India Agency, and the river Jumna up to its confluence with the 
Tonse, beyond which point the latter stream forms the boundary separating the Provinces 
from the Native States of Sirmur and Jubbal in the Punjab jurisdiction. 

Topography, &c. 

The greater portion of this territory consists of an alluvial and gently inclined plain, 
dipping towards the south-east and open on that side. To the south-west this plain abuts 
upon the outlying spurs of the great elevated plateau of Central India. On the north-east 
lie the plains of Rohilkhand and Oudh ; on the south-east, the plains of the Benares Division. 
To the south-west of the river Jumna lies the tract called Bundelkhand, which for a few 
miles from the banks of that river on the south, differs little from the comparatively level 
country on the north. Beyond this level country, hills appear, at first isolated then gradually 
assuming the formation of groups and ranges, finally merging in the Khaimur and Vindhya 
chains, covered with extensive forests and jungle, and traversed by streams that form tor- 
rents during the rainy season. Turning to the north we are met by a marshy belt of land 
known as the * Tarai^ and between this and the hills, by a belt of waterless jungle, formed 
of boulders and the debris of the lower ranges of the Himalayas, and extending from 
four to fourteen miles in breadth, called the * Bhabar.^ To the west of the * Bhabar* come 
the Kotla, Patli and Dehra Duns or Valleys. The largest of these * Duns,' which all lie 
nearly parallel to the great chain of the Himalayas beyond, is the Dehra Dun, 48 miles 
long, the centre of which (2,229 ^^^t above the sea level), divides the valley into two portions, 
with two distinct slopes of drainage to the east and west ; the Asnu and Suswa rivers ema- 
nate from this central elevation, the former flowing to the Jumna, the latter to the Ganges. 

The Himalayan tracts included within these provinces consist of the districts of 
Kumaun and Garhwal, and native Garhwal or Tehri, — the Kumaun division embracing all 
the ranges and valleys from the plains to Thibet — and of the tract known as Jaunsar 
Bawar, The exterior ranges rise to a height of 7,000 or 8,000 feet, increasing gradually in 
parts, and in some places rising abruptly to this height. The elevation gradually increas- 
es again until 10,000 and 11,000 feet are attained in the spurs directly connected with the 
snowy range, we then meet the peaks of Trisul (22,342 feet), Nandi Debi (25,661 feet), 
Nandi Kot (22,538 feet) Badrinath and others, all situated to the south of the great central 
axis of the Himalayas. The Jaunsar Bawar tract comprises similar hilly country lying 
between the upper courses of the Jumna and Tonse rivers. These tracts form the great 
timber reserves of the North-Western Provinces. 

The principal river of these provinces is the Ganges, rising in the mountains of native 
Garhwal or Tehri, and flowing with a south-easterly course. On the right bank of this river 
near Hardwar, the great Ganges Canal is drawn off. The next river in importance is the 
Jumna, also rising in native Garhwal to the west of the Ganges, and flowing for nearly 



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The North'Western Provinces,— Coniinued. 37 

two-thirds of its course in almost the same direction as the Ganges, finally meeting with it at 
Allahabad. The discharge of the Jumna as it enters the plains has been estimated at 4,000 
cubic feet per second in March, and that of the Ganges at Hardwar at 7,000 cubic feet per 
second ; at Benares the breadth of this last named river during the winter season is 1,400 
feet, with an average depth of 35 feet, and a discharge of 19,000 cubic feet per second. 
During the rainy season the breadth at the same place is 3,000 feet and the rise 43 feet 
The other rivers flowing into the Ganges, are the Ramganga rising in the Tarai, the 
Gumti rising in the swamps of Rohilkhand, and the Gogra, called in its higher course the 
Kaiuriala. This last river vies with the Ganges itself in volume and the number of its tri- 
butary streams, while it surpasses the Ganges in velocity. On the right bank, the Jumna 
receives the large rivers that drain the eastern portions of the Rajputana, Central India 
and Bundelkhand States, viz,, the Chambal, the Betwa and the Ken. 

The canals of these provinces irrigate nearly one million acres annually and yield 
a revenue of close upon a quarter of a million sterling. The principal are the Ganges 
Canal, opened in 1851, consisting of 654 miles of main canal, and 3,078 miles of distribu- 
taries, watering a tract of country in the Doab, 320 miles in length and 50 miles in breadth : 
the Eastern Jumna Canal, opened in 1830, consisting of 130 miles of main canal and 625 
miles of distributaries, watering a tract 120 miles long and 15 miles broad : the Agra Canal, 
opened in 1874, 75 miles in length, irrigating about 400,000 acres : the Dehra Dun 
Canal, 67 miles in length, irrigating about 13,000 acres : and the cartals in the Hamirpur 
and Jhansi districts, with a total length of 33 miles. Besides these there are other minor 
canals in Rohilkhand, opened at various times since 1874, for irrigating the belt of country 
along the Tarai where much rice is raised. 

The East-Indian Railway {1,279)^ miles in length) runs through the middle of these 
provinces up to the city of Delhi. From Allahabad a line to Jubbulpore (223^ miles 
in length) connects the East-Indian Railway with the Great Indian Peninsular Railway. 
The Oudh and Rohilkhand Railway (547 J^ miles in length) joins the East-Indian Rail- 
way at Benares, Cawnpore and Aligarh. The Sind, Punjab and Delhi Railway (553^^ 
miles in length ) runs from Ghaziabad on the East-Indian line, to Lahore and Mooltan in 
the Punjab, vid Meerut, Saharanpur and Umballa. The State Railway from Agra gid 
Bhurtpore joins the Rajputana State Railway, running from Delhi to Jeypore and 
Ajmere. The Sindhia State Railway (69 miles in length) runs from Agra to Gwalior vid 
Dholpur. There are other light Railways connected with important centres of the East- 
Indian and Oudh and Rohilkhand lines, viz : — The Hathras and Muttra line, length 29 
miles, in full working order, the extension to Achnera from Muttra being in course of 
construction ; the Gliazipur and Dildamagar line, length 12 miles; the Cawnpore and 
Farukhabad line, length 84 miles also under construction ; while surveys are in progress for 
the Cawnpore and Mau Ranipur line, the Manikpur and Banda line, the Bareilly and 
Pilibhit line, the Sitapur, Lucknow and Roe Bareilly line, the Balramghat extension to 
Bahraich and Gorakhpur vid Gonda and Basti, iht/aunpur and Azamgarh line, the Morad- 
abad and Ramnagar line, and the Roorkee and Dehra line vid Hardwar. The whole of 
the North-Western Provinces are also well supplied with first-class metalled roads, the chief 
of which is the Grand Trunk Road, running through the principal towns of the Doab. 

Climate and Sanataria. 

With the exception of the Tarai, the districts of these provinces are as a rule healthy. 

The climate is however subject to great extremes, the cold of winter being severe and the 

heat of summer almost intolerable. The hot westerly winds of April, May and June are 

especially trying to European constitutions. The cold season commences with the close 



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38 The North-Western Prouinces, — Continued 

of the rains in October and lasts until April in the upper districts ; in the Benares Division 
it may be considered to extend from November untfl the banning of March. The hot 
weather succeeds and lasts until the beginning of the rains, which set in usually about the 
latter end of June and continue until the middle of October. The thermometer during 
the hot weather months ranges from 86*' to 109" in the shade, the average being about 
94°. The average yearly rain-fall in the plains b from 30 to 45 inches, increasing gradually 
towards the hills, where Mussoorie receives 90 inches and Naini Tal 115 inches. The 
climate of the Benares Division is more moist and cool, and partakes somewhat of the 
character of that of Bengal The Sanataria of the North-Westem Provinces, seven in num- 
ber, are the following], viz : — Chakrata, height 6,885 ^^^ y Mussoorie, height 7,026 feet ; 
and Landour, height 7,459 feet, in district Dehra Dun. Ranikhet, height 6,885 ^^^^ * 
Naini Tal, height 6,568 feet ; Almora, height 5,074 feet ; and Pithoragarh, height 5,468 
feet, in district Kumaun. See also list of Military stations at page 35. 

Staples and Manufactures. 
The principal crops grown and exported are cotton, opium, indigo, rice, barley, maize, 
sugar-cane, wheat, potatoes, oilseeds, and the millets ; tobacco, lacdye, safflower, and salt- 
petre are also exported. Tea is largely grown in the Dehra Dun and Kumaun districts, 
and potatoes are extensively produced in several districts, having become one of the great 
food staples of the country. The North-Westem Provinces are not rich in minerals, but 
iron, lead and copper-ores abound in Kumaun ; kankar^ an inferior kind of limestone, 
much used for roads and building purposes, is very abundant The principal manu- 
factures are sugar at Shahjahanpur, leather at Cawnpore, carpets and embroidery at Mirza- 
pore, and kimkhwdbs (gold brocades) at Benares. Brass and copper utensils for cooking 
purposes, cabinet work and cutlery are manufactured in every considerable town. 

Form of Administration. 

The Lieutenant-Governor is the chief executive authority in these provinces, which for 
administrative purposes is divided into seven divisions embracing 35 districts, each divi- 
sion is under the superintendence of a Commissioner and each district under a Magistrate- 
Coiector. The districts are again sub-divided into tahsils or sub-divisions, each under a 
native Tahsildar or Sub-Collector. Certain districts are regulation while others are non- 
regulation. The Regulation districts are those in which all the laws and regulations appli- 
cable to these provinces are in force ; the Non-Regulation districts are those to which only 
certain portions of the law have been extended. They form the Kumaun and Jhansi 
divisions, also the Tarai. The chief executive officers of the non-regulation districts are 
styled Deputy Commissioners, having civil, criminal and revenue powers. In the regulation 
districts besides the Magistrate-Collector, there are three classes of Civil Judges, all subor- 
dinate to the High Court at Allahabad, the seat of Government. 

Census. 

The last census taken of the North-Western Provinces was in 1872. In 1848, 1853 
and 1865 enumerations of the population were made, with increasing accuracy on each 
successive occasion. In 1865 the total population recorded was 29,684,347 ; in 1872 
the population numbered 30,776,442 souls. The increase has been 3*65 percent. ; while 
the Hindu population shows an increase of from 25,495,871 in 1865 to 26,542,600 in 
1872, the Mahomedans appear to have remained almost stationary, their total for 1872 
showing 4,186,913 against 4,188,476 in 1865. The population per square mile for the 
whole of the North-Western Provinces was 376 in 1872, and was classified as follows : — 



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The North-Western Prouinces,— Continued. 39 

21,626 Christians, Europeans, East Indians and Natives; 4,186,913 Mahomedans; 
26,542,600 Hindus; I4)i59 Buddhists and Jains, and 11,144 Aborigines and others. 
The agricultural population is 56 per cent, of the whole. The district and city of Benares 
are the most populous in these provinces. 



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42 Oudh, — Continued, 

BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

Area, Position^ Boundaries^ &c. 

The Province of Oudh, which was annexed by the British Government under the 
administration of Lord Dalhousie in 1856, was at first a separate Chief Commissionership 
under the Supreme Government, it was afterwards incorporated with the North-Westem 
Provinces, on the ist January 1877, the Lieutenant-Governor of the North-Westem Pro- 
vinces, bearing the additional title of Chief Commissioner of Oudh. 

The Province is situated in the middle valley of the Ganges, which river forms its 
Southern boundary ; on the East and West it is enclosed by the older acquired districts 
of the North-Westem Provinces, with Jaunpur, Basti and Azamgarh on one side, and 
Shahjahanpur, Famkhabad and Cawnpore on the other ; on the North the boundary, 
partly natural and partly artificial, marches with that of the independent kingdom of 
Nepal Its greatest length from North- West to South-East is 234 miles, and its breadth 
150 miles. Oudh lies between 25** 34' and 2(f 6' North Latitude, and 79' 45' and 83' 
1 1' East Longitude. The total area of the Province is 23,954 square miles, of which 
13,126 square miles are cultivated with crops; 952 square miles are covered with 
orchards of mango and mohwa trees; 1,134 square miles, or about 6)4 per cent of the 
total area, are covered with lakes, ponds and rivers ; 478 square miles are occupied by 
the sites of towns and villages ; 243 square miles with roads ; 1,642 square miles, or about 
7 per cent, are barren waste, and of the remainder, 825 square miles are Govemment 
Forests, while 5,554 square miles, or about 22 per cent of the whole, are arable waste. 

Topography, 6fc. 

The general surface of the country is a .plain sloping from North- West to South-East, 
varied here and there with almost imperceptible undulations, the highest part of the 
country being the high land north of Dudwah Ghat in Khairagarh, which is 600 feet 
above sea level, while the lowest point, on the border of the Jaunpur district, is 230 feet 
The first or lower chain of the Himalayas, which bounds the province on the North-East 
along the Gonda district, is from 2,500 to 4,000 feet in height. This chain is one of 
four parallel ranges mnning through Nepal, each loftier and more remote, one rising a 
little above the other, all of which are distinctly visible in the rains from Fyzabad and 
Sitapur, a distance of nearly 200 miles. The main rivers are the Ganges, which mns along 
its southem boundary, the Gumti, the Sarda, the Kauriala and Gogra, the Ramganga, the 
Sai and the RaptL Their aggregate dry weather discharge is 18,800 cubic feet per second, 
and the entire river discharge reaches 20,000 cubic feet, or half the quantity of the five 
rivers of the Punjab ; their channels lie on an average from 20 to 50 feet below the 
level of the country. The rivers of the province afford about 1,350 miles of navigable 
stream. Numerous y%/7f or marshes exist, only two of which however can be dignified 
with the name of lakes, m., Behti in district Partabgarh, and Sandi in district HardoL 
The forests of Oudh lie principally in the districts of Kheri, Bahraich and Gonda, 
on the North. 

The Oudh and Rohilkhand Railway mns through the entire length of the Province, 
connecting with the East-Indian Railway at Benares, Cawnpore and Aligarh. Surveys 
are in progress for branch-feeders to this line as detailed already at page 37. 

Oudh is a tropical country, a little smaller than Scotland, and somewhat larger than 
Denmark, but with a population more than double that of both countries put together. 
The country along the northern frontier is thinly 'populated. 



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Oudh, — Continued. 43 

Climate. 

Though the climate is subject to extremes of temperature, sometimes rising to 112' 
in the summer and sinking to 35* in the winter, it may be briefly described as a mean 
between that of the Punjab and North-Western Provinces, and that of Bengal, for while 
the cold is not so great, nor the dry heats so intense as in the former, the difference in 
the seasons is far more marked than in the lower Provinces of Bengal with their moister 
though more equable temperature. Its three seasons, the cold, the hot and the rainy, 
are well defined, the first extending firom early in October to end of March, the second 
following, and the third commencing with fair regularity in the middle of June and 
lasting to the middle of October. To a European the climate of Oudh during the short 
cold season seems nearly perfect. The plains are subject to hot sultry winds from the 
west and occasional fierce hurricanes. 

Staples and Manufactures. 

A large amount of wheat and other edible grains is produced in and exported from 
Oudh ; sugar, tobacco, saltpetre and oilseeds are also produced and exported in consi- 
derable quantities. Some of the Oudh rice and tobacco are of superior quality. The 
.population being essentially agricultural, the province can boast of no manufactures worth 
mentioning. 

Except minute particles of gold, which are washed down by the hill torrents 
in quantities too infinitessimal to repay their collection, valuable minerals are not 
known to exist Kankar or carbonate of lime exists all over the province, and is used 
for the production of lime for building, and for roads. 

Form of Administration. 

The administration of Oudh is carried on under the Non-Regulation system by the 
Lieutenant-Governor of the North-Western Provinces, who is also styled Chief Com- 
missioner of Oudh, {;vide the opening paragraph of this description). For administra- 
tive purposes the province is divided into four divisions, each controlled by a Com- 
missioner, and subordinate to Commissioners are 12 Deputy Commissioners, each 
holding executive charge of a district. In every district there are three or more sub- 
divisions, the direct management of each being entrusted to a native Sub-Collector, or 
Tahsildar. There are 44 such sub-divisions in the 12 districts of this province. 

Census. 
There has been but one Census in Oudh, taken on the night of the ist February, 
1869. The Area of the Province being 23,954 square miles, and the population as shewn 
by the Census Returns, 1 1, 220,232, there were then 468 persons to each square mile. In 
density of population Oudh surpasses most parts of India and no European country 
approaches it. The Census Returns classify the population as follows : — 1,201,253 
Mahomedans; 9,971*236 Hindus; 7,531 Christians; 40,212 Soldiers and Prisoners, 
European and Native. 



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II. 

The Bengal Presidency. 



3. 

THE BENGAL OR LOWER 
PROVINCES: 

Comprising 9 Divisions or Commissionerships, embracing 43 Districts, 



WITH THE 



NATIVE STATES ATTACHED THERETO. 

Under a Lieutenant-Governor. 



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46 



Bengal Gouernment 



Geographical Area of the Territories under the Civil and Political control of the 
Lieutenant-Governor of Bengal^ 1877-78, 



Principal Geographical Divisions. 


Total Area. 


British Possessions directly Administered— 

Bengal Proper ... 

Behar 

Chota Nagpore 

Orissa . 


Square Miles. 

69,749 

44,174 

27,883 

8,056 


Total 


149,862 


Sundarbans 


5,340 


Tributary States— 

Cooch Behar State 
Chota Nagpore States 
Orissa States 
HillTipperah 


1,307 

15,419 
16,184 

2,869 


Total 


35,779 


Sikklm 


2,600 


Grand Total, Area under Bengal Government ... 

•-^ - ■ ■ - — ■ ■ ~ ^-^- -r- 


193,581 



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The Bengal or Lower Prouincea, — Continued. 



53 



1877-78 
4 DISTRICTS. 



Lat. N. ) of District capital 
Long. E. ) to nearest minute 
Height in feet 



District Statistics. 

Ai«a in Square Miles 
K umber of Villages . . 
PopoJation 

„ I^r Square Mile 
Average Rainfall in inches 
Land Revenue . . Rs 

Classificatien of Population. 

{Europeans 
East Indians 
Natives 

Hindus 

Mahomedans .. 
Others 



Total 



CHOTA NAGPORE DIVISION, (Non-Regui.ation). 




771.875 



Manbhoom 



Purulia 
23" ao' 
86 25 



^368 

995.570 

ao3 

88,1^5 



39 

14 

539 

827,936 

33,622 

133,420 



Chief 

Towns 

with 

Popln. 



nil 

^ .- 



ii" 



27,883 

22,079 

3,322,848 

141 

50 

3,64,226 



',517 

55 

14,226 

2,366,433 

165,656 

774,961 



3,32?,848 



1877-78 
3 DISTRICTS, 



Lat. N. ) of District capital 
Long. E. ) to nearest minute 
Height in feet 



District Statistics, 

Area in Square Miles 
Number of Villages . . 
Population 

„ Per Square Mile 
Average Rainfall in inches 
Land Revenue .. R&, 

ClassifiasHon of Foliation. 

{Europeans 
East Indians 
Natives 
Hindus 

Mahomedans .. 
Others 



Total 



ORISSA DIVISION. 



Balasorb. 



ai 30 
86 58 



a,o68 

3,266 

770,232 

373 
66 

4.04.713 



37 

45 

448 

738,396 

18,878 

12,428 



770,23a 



Chief Towns 

with 
Population. 




CUTTACK. 



POORBB. 



ao'aS' 

85 54 

80 



Chief Towns 

with 
Population. 



3,516 

5,500 

«, 494.784 

470 

8,38,343 



193 
210 

1,91 r 

1,430,040 

40,013 

22,417 



»,494,784 






_3 t.^ y« 

1 ' 



\i 



19-48' 
85 5a 



8,47a 

769,674 

3" 

55 

4,81,492 



16 
552 

739.636 
11,586 
17,876 



769,674 



Chief Towns 

with 
Population. 






III 






8,056 

11,941 

3,034,690 

377 
17.24.548 



238 

271 

2,911 

3,908,072 

70,477 

52.721 



3,034,690 



Calcutta. Area, Population, Revenue, 6r*c,, 1877-78. 



Area in Square Miles, ^l^^^ 
Popdaticn .. |Town^ ;; 

ClassificaHoH of Popuiation (Tovm.) 

Christians ••(E^^^iLw 
I Natives 
Hindus 
Mahomedans 
Paisis 

Buddhists and Jains 
Aborigines 



Town. 
Men .. 856,150 

Women .. 121,705 

Children ) Male 36,356 
under 12 ) Fenude 35,324 



429,535 
257, '49 



9,270 

",338 

3,277 

279,014 

"3,550 

i5» 

1,878 

1,051 



/Xand .. 

I Excise, Suburbs included 
Revenue . . J Stamps 
fTown) ) Registration 
Road Cess 
V, Municipal Taxes . 



No. of Police 

Cost of Officials and Police 

No. of People per Square mile 



Rs. 



Total Rs. 



Rs. 



37,740 
14,59,012 
16,92,917 

42,103 



23,72,139 



56,03,911 



3,130 

23,93,347 
53.692 



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54 The Bengal or Lower Provinces, — Continued. 

List of the Native Feudatory and Tributary States^ or Foreign Territory^ embraced in the 
Bengal Jurisdiction^ and Subordinate to the Bengal Government, 









Estimated. 








Of the Capital! 


s 




1877^8. 
States and Chibpships 






Position 










4 


Area. 


PopoU- 


Rcve- 


of 
Chief. 


5 


5& 


Latde. 


Longd. 


1 








tion. 


nne. 




S 


£,s 


N. 


E. 


X 


p 




Statei. Ca^ials. 


Sq. m. 




Rs. 




Rs. 








feet. 




1 


CoochBeluir .. CoochBehar 7,023.. 


«.307 


532,565 


9,90,660 


Maharaja 


67,700 


80 


26* 20' 


89*29' 


.. 




2 


HillTipperah .. AgartoJa 26,801., 
Chota Niigpon Statts (Garhjat.) 


•.869 


91,759 


9,00,000 


do. 




400 


23 50 


91 20 


•• 














3 


X. Chang Bakhar 


Janakpur 
Sanhat 


906 


8,920 


3»ooo 


Raja 


386 


None 


23 43 


81 50 


1,513 


n 




2. Koria 


i,6-»i 


21,130 


7,000 do. 


i,8qi 


„ 


23 29 


82 34 


2,477 


s . 




3. Sarguja 
5. Udaipur 


Bisrampur 


6,103 


182,830 


2,00,000 do. 




23 7 


83 14 


",953 

2,576 

900 




&r^ :: 


»,947 
«,05i 


66,926 
27,700 


20,000 
8,000 


do. 
do. 


775 
533 




22 28 


84 1. 
83 15 


Is 




6. Gangpur -J 


Suadi 
Hingir 


«,484 


73,640 


20,000 


do. 


500 




22 8 

21 57 


83 44 


766 




7. Bonai 

§. Seraikela .. 


Bonaigarh 


1,297 


24,830 


6,000 


do. 


200 




21 44 


85 


.•W 


6t* 




Seraikela 


457 


53,370 


30,000 


do. 






22 42 


85 59 




^^ 




9. Kharsawan . . 


Kharsawan 


149 


23,220 


15.000 


do. 


., 


„ 


22 48 


85 52 


.. 


^? 




10. Dhalbhum .. 


GhatsHa 




•• 




da 


•• 


„ 


22 35 


86 31 




r 




Total 
Orissa Tributary States. 


16,025 


482,566 


3,09,000 


4,685 


4 
























I. Angul 


AneuHCuttack.) .. 
Athgarh 


881 


'^%t 


30,670 


Raja 






20 48 


85 X 








2. Athgarh . . 


x68 


14,940 


do. 


2,800 


^ 


20 32 


85 41 






. 




3. AthmalUk.. 


Handapa 

Banki (CutUck) .. 


730 


»4»536 


7,100 


do. 


480 


20 57 


84 44 











4. Banki 


116 


49,4*6 


19,960 


do. 






20 21 


85 33 






•i 




5. Baramba .. 


Baramba 


^V 


24,070 


26,062 


da 


"gS 


709 


20 25 


85 23 






^ 




6. Bod 


Bod 


?,<^4 


57,05a 


7,000 


da 


^ 


20 50 


84 22 






Q 




7. DaspalU .. 

8. Dhenkanal. 


Daspalla 


570 


34,805 


'3,494 


da 


661 


ao 19 


84 56 






9 




Dhenkanal 


1.473 


178,070 


70,100 


Maharaja 


5.099 


ni 


20 40 


85 38 






*E 




9. Hindol .. 


Hindol 


3.ia6 


38/»5 


15,000 


Raja 


551 


20 36 


staJ 











10. Kconjhar .. 


Keonjhar 


181,871 


63,395 


Maharaja 


1,976 


2,949 


21 37 






i 

1 




XI. Khandpara. 


Khandpara 


845 


60,877 


22,581 


Raja 


4,211 


«,435 


20 16 


86 7 








xa. Morbhanj | 


Baripada 
Daspur 


4,983 


258,658 


2,05,156 


Maharaja 


1,067 


512 


21 56 
21 58 








13. Naniinghpur 


Narsinghpur 


V,\ 


24,758 


9,850 


Raja 


i,4S5 


184 


20 28 


85 7 










14. Nilgiii 


Nilgiri 


33,944 
83,249 
«5,45o 


21,792 

54,188 

i,aoo 


do. 


3,900 


177 


21 27 


8ll 
85 14 






( 
^ 




15 Nayagarh .. 
16. Pal Lahara. 


ass^ 


560 
45a 


da 
da 


'111 


741 
94 


20 8 

21 26 








17. Ranpur .. 
t8. Talcher .. 


Ranpur 
Talchcr 


203 


27,300 
38,020 


6,962 
41,473 


da 
da 


1,400 


954 


20 4 
20 57 


1? \i 








19. Tigaria .. 


Tigaria 


16,420 


3,000 


do. 


20 Ik 


84 34 










Total .. 1 


.6,184 


1,231,247 


6,33,923 


33,510 


11,414 






5 


Sikkim 


Tamlang 


2,600 


50,000 


7,000 


Maharaja 


None 


None 


2724 


88 38 


^ooo 





Notes on the above States, 

Cocch Behar, — ^This State is under the Commissioner, Rigshahye and Cooch Behar DivisioQ. 

Hill Ti^rah,—TYii& State is under no ^)ecific engagement to the British Government, though the MahanO<^ '^ ^ British 
Zemindar, deriving the greatest portion of his income from landed property in the adjoining regulation district of Tipperab. 
This Prince pays a succession duty to the Paramount Power, and is now practically a Feudatory under a Political Agent. 
The succession duty is half a year's Revenue of the State in the case of direct^ and a whole year's Revenue b the case of 
indirect successions. There are no mines in the state, nor manufactures beyond those required for the commonest, neces- 
saries of life. The dialect of this state is Kuki, 

(kirhjeU States^ Chota Nagpore,—ThKst Chiefii are exempted fixMn the operations of the ordinary laws. They dispose of 
dvil matters and minor criminal cases, sending up heinous offences for the orders of the Commissioner, who exercises a 
general control over their administration in other respects. Kharsawan^ Seraikela and Dhalbhum^ although still under 
Tributary Chiefs, are now treated as parts of the British district of Singhbhoom ; their area, population and revenue, though 
given here, have not been included in the statement for ' Feudatory India ' at page la 

Orissa Tributary States.— The same remarks apply to these States. Two of them, Angul and Banld, have lapsed to 
the British Government, owing to the misconduct of their chie6. 

SikAim.—This is a subsidized state connected with DaijeeKng. (See "Outlying Independent States.") 

Excepting Sikkim, the population of these states is given from the last detailed census and may be considered reliable. 
The precise Revenues derived by the Rigahs from their estates are not generally known, the estimates have been made from 
the best available sources. The Military Force of the Orissa States, though large in figures, is absolutely contempciUe, the 
jnen generally perform the duties of Police. 



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The Bengal or Lower Provinces, — Continued, 

Military Stations^ Presidency District^ Bengal. 



55 



Stations. 



Latdb. Longdb. 
N. » E. 

to nearest minute. 



Stations. 



Latdb. Longdb. 
N. ' E. 

to nearest minute. 



I Fort WUHam (Hd. Qrs.) 
« Alipore 

3 Dum Oum 

4 ' Barrmdcpore .. 

5 Berhampore 

6 t Dacca 



aa 33 

ea 3a 
aa 38 

aa 46 
a4 6 
a3 4a 



88- a3' 
88 as 
88 a8 
88 84 
88 18 
90 96 



feet. 



65 
35 



Hazaribagh 
Doranda 
Bhagalpur 
Nya Doomka 
Darjeeling (Sanitarium) 



aa 59 

a3 ai 

as 15 

a4 16 



85' «S' 
85 aa 

87 17 

88 19 



feet. 
ii995 
a, 166 



7.169 



BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

AreUy Position^ Boundaries, <Sfc. 
The territory under the administration of the Lieutenant-Governor of Bengal, com- 
prising the four provinces of Bengal Proper, Behar, Chota Nagpore, and Orissa, lies 
between 19' 28' and 27* 30' North Latitude, and 81" 35' and 92** 46' East Longitude. 
These provinces, constituting the Bengal Government, are bounded on the North by the 
independent native states of Nepal, Sikkim, and Mutan ; on the East by the province of 
Assain, the hilly country occupied by the Lushai and Kuki tribes, and the Arakan Hills 
and District of the British Burmah Province; the South is washed by the sea known 
as the Bay of Bengal ; and on the South-West and West by the Ganjam district of the 
Madras Presidency, the Central Provinces, the Rewah Native State, and districts 
Mirzapur, Benares, Ghazipur and Gorakhpur of the North-Westem Provinces. The total 
area of this jurisdiction is 193,581 square miles, inclusive of 38,379 square miles belonging 
to the Native Feudatory States connected therewith. 

Topography^ (Sfc. 

Broadly speaking, the chief characteristics of these extensive provinces are, the plain 
of the Lower Ganges sloping from the north-west ; the plain of the Lower Brahmaputra, 
from the foot of the Garo Hills, sloping due south ; and the great Delta of Bengal. On 
the south-west of these great plains rise the high lands of Chota Nagpore and Orissa ; on 
the east are the Chittagong, Tipperah, Garo, Khasi, and other hills ; on the north is the 
hilly Darjeeling District and the Bengal Himalayas. 

Bengal Proper is the great alluvial and deltaic plain between the Himalayas and 
the Bay of Bengal. 

Behar is the Gangetic plain lying between Bengal proper and the North-Western 
Provinces. In Behar is also included a narrow range of hills in the Sonthal Parganas, known 
as the Rajmahal. 

Chota (or Chutia) Nagpore is the elevated and hilly country west of Bengal Proper, 
south of Behar, and north of Orissa. 

Orissa comprises a long flat deluvial strip between the hills and the sea, (forming one 
settled province), and a large hilly tract beyond occupied by tributary states. 

The greater part of Bengal Proper and Behar are uninterrupted flats subject to in- 
undation, rich in black mould and most fertile,, the Dacca Division being so fertile that it 
has been called the granary of Bengal. 

Turning to the mountains we have in the small part of the Himalayan chain coming 
within the Bengal jurisdiction, elevations varying from 7,000 feet above the sea at Darjeeling 
on the south, to lofty Kanchinjinga, 28,000 feet, oa the north-west. The Rajmahal hills. 



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56 The Bengal or Lower Provinces, — Continued. 

in the Sonthal Parganas, ending with the town of that name on the Ganges, form the 
eastern projection of the Central Indian formation running through the Chota Ns^pore 
province, which is hilly throughout Several broken detached hills, some of considerable 
height, appear as irr^ular links of the main chain ; the largest of these is Parasnath rising 
to a height of 4,488 feet above the sea. A continuation of the same Central Indian 
formation runs through the tributary states of Oissa, with varying elevations of from 
2,000 to 4,000 feet above the sea. On the east, the mountainous tracts of Hill Ti^^rah 
and Chittagong are a continuation of the Manipur and Lushai ranges, with elevations 
rising to 11 and 12,000 feet 

The Ganges river touches the Behar Province at Buxar, on the East India Railway, 
and enters it near Chupra, where the Gogra from the north meets it It then receives 
the Soane on the south, and the Gandak and Kosi again on the north, all rivers of con- 
siderable volume. Turning the corner of the Rajmahal hills, the Ganges flows with its great- 
est body of water in a south-easterly direction, when the Bhagirati first flows away from; it oa 
the west side to form the Hooghly, the most navigable of its many mouths. The main 
stream continuing its course, and throwing ofl* several channels to form the Delta, meets 
the main stream of the Brahmaputra (known here as the Jamuna) at Goalundo, the termi- 
nus of the Eastern Bengal Railway, the amalgamated colmnn then empties itself by 
numerous channels into the Bay of Bengal 

From these rivers the Gangetic Delta is formed. Between the cultivated portions 
of this Delta and the sea is a tract bearing the general name of the Sundarbans^ covered 
with dense forest, and which, owing to the inroads of the sea and wild beasts, as well as 
its general unhealthinessi has baffled the enterprise of modern man.. The area of this 
tract is about 5,340 square miles. 

The other rivers of these provinces are, on the east, the Megna (called in its upper 
course the Surma), which is the high road to Cachar as it affords good water communica- 
tion for the greater part of its lei^h ; the Fenny, rising in Hill Tipperah and the 
Karnafuli rising in the highlands of the Lushai country. The two last flow into the 
Bay of Bengal. 

On the west of the great Gangetic Delta, not helping however to form it, but joining 
the Hooghly between Calcutta and Saugor Island, are the Damuda, the Ri^narain and 
the Cossye, all rising in the highlands of Chota Nagpore. 

The Subaranrekha also rising in Chota Nagpore ; the Baitarni and Brahmani, rising 
in the highlands of Orissa, and the Mahanadi rising in the Central Provinces^ flow east- 
wards into the Bay of Bengal. 

The East-Indian Railway runs through the middle of these provinces from Calcutta 
up to Buxar ; a portion of it from Kanoo Junction running due north, and then turning 
due west, joins the line again at Lakhiserai ; this portion is called the " Loop" line, to 
distinguish it from the straight or "Chord" line connecting these two stations. The 
Tirhoot State Railway (82 miles in length) runs from Barh on the East-Indian line to Tirhoot, 
with a branch to Durbhangah. The Nulhati State Railway (27 miles in lei^h) branches 
ofl* from Nulhati station on the East-Indian Railway to Azimganj. The Eastern Bengal 
Railway (172 miles in length) runs from Calcutta to Goalundo, tapping the Eastern Districts 
of Bengal, while the South-Eastern State Railway (28 miles in length) connects Calcutta 
with Port Canning. The Northern Bengal State Railway (219 miles in length), tapping 
the principal jute, rice and tobacco exporting districts of Northern Bengal and the tea 
growing country at the foot of the Himalayas, leaves the Eastern Bengal Railway at 



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The Bengal or Lower Provinces,— Continued. 57 

Porada station, and after crossing the river at Sara runs to Siligori, 30 miles from Dar. 
jeeling* ; a branch line from Parbattipur station runs to Rungpore to be eventually 
extended to DhubrL The Gya State Railway (57 miles in length) branches ofif from Patna 
city, on the East-Indian line, to the town of Gjra. 

The Grand Trunk road runs direct from Calcutta to Benares and is the great 
highway for traffic in those portions of Behar and Chota Nagpore not having Railway 
communication. In the Deltaic country of Bengal, water communication is much availed 
o^ hence Bengal Proper is not so well supplied with roads as the other Bengal Provinces, 

The Canals of these provinces lie principally in Orissa and Behar. The Orissa 
scheme as it is termed, embraces the Kendrapara canal with branch to Gundukia on the 
Gobri river, length 39 miles, irrigating about 100,000 acres. The Patamundi branch, 
length 40m iles ; the Taldanda (27 miles) and Machgong (30 miles) canals, irrigat- 
ing about 50,000 acres ; the High Level canal for irrigation and navigation, running 
from Calcutta to Cuttack vid Midnapore, a length of 52 miles. The other canals are, the 
Midnapore canal connecting Midnapore with tide water in the Hooghly at Oolabaria, 
16 miles below Calcutta, having a navigable length of 53 miles; the Tidal canal, 
length 28 miles, connecting the rivers Hooghly, Haldi and Russulpur in the Hidgelee 
portion of the Midnapore District ; the Soane canals for the irrigation of South Behar, 
to be extended eventually to Mirzapore on one side and to Monghyr on the other, with 
branches and distributaries in the districts of Shahabad, Gya and Patna ; the Arrah canal, 
65 miles ; the Western main canal, 22 miles ; the Patna canal, 86 J^ miles; and the Buxar 
canal, 45 miles. Jhils or extensive shallow lakes are very numerous, but then* limits are 
generally ill defined. The most extensive and remarkable are the Monda Jhil, the 
Dulabari Jhil and the Chullam Jhil in the district of Rajshahye, the Aka Jhil in the 
district of Jessore and the great Jhil in the district of Backergunge. 

Climate. 
Although these four Provinces, (Bengal Proper, Behar, Chota Nagpore and Orissa) 
under the Bengal Government are situated for the most part without the Tropical Zone, 
their climate is characteristically tropical In the annual range of their temperature, as 
well as in point of humidity and rainfall, the eastern and western portions of the whole 
country which includes them, are strongly contrasted. The mean temperature of the 
whole year is 82' in Orissa and Behar, and 73** in the Chittagong and Dacca Divisions. 
In Orissa and the western part of the Gangetic Delta, December is the coldest month of 
the year, elsewhere the mean temperature of January is somewhat lower. During the 
rains the temperature of the Hazaribagh plateau falls more rapidly than that of any other 
part of Bengal Between May and October the fall at Hazaribagh is rather more than 
II*, while at Berhampore in the Delta, and in about the same latitude, it is only 4^*, and 
at Calcutta a little more than 3°, even at Patna it does not exceed 8^ The high humidity 
of the atmosphere in Bengal Proper, and more especially in its eastern districts, has 
become proverbial The average annual humidity of a large portion of Bengal is how- 
ever sensibly lower than that of England. The quantity of vapour in the air of Calcutta 
is on the average of the year about twice as great as in that of London. The absolute 
humidity of the atmosphere is greatest on the coast of Orissa and the Sundarbans and 
dinunishes inland as the distance from the sea increases. In the cold weather and spring 
months, this decrease is rapid everywhere except in Eastern Bengal 

* Nott. — A company for the purpose of constructing, maintaing and working a steam tramway between the terminus of 
tlic Northern Besgai State Railway at Siligori and the Sution of Darjeeling has been suurted with Government aid. 

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58 The Bengal or Lower Provinces, — Continued: 

The districts of Eastern Bengal, more especially those of the Chittagong Division, 
show the heaviest rainfall In this division the average annual fall almost everywhere 
amounts to upwards of loo inches. In the Darjeeling and Jalpaiguri districts, on the 
exposed hill flanks and at their t>ase, even this large amount is greatly surpassed. The 
rainfall is also higher on the plains of the coast, than on those lying more inland. By 
for the greater part of the rainfell of the Province falls between the months of June and 
October, showers also occur in the hot weather months, and in the months of February 
and March hail storms are not unfrequent In the eastern districts rain occurs occasionally 
in the cold weather months, but is less common in the Delta and the country further 
westward. During February, March, April and May the prevailing wind is from the 
south. The climate of Orissa is by no means as healthy as the other portions of these 
provinces. The climate of Behar and of Chota Nagpore is not unlike that of the North- 
western Provinces in its eastern districts, while that of the Bengal Delta or Bengal Proper 
may be summed up as follows for the different months of the year : — ^^ January — ^Air serene 
and cold. Winds N. and N. W. Fog in early morning and heavy dews at night Thermometer 
minimum 58' maximum 76', mean 67*. February — Pleasant and cool till the middle. Wind 
then changes to S and S. K Thermometer 65* to 83"*, mean 74*. March — The hot season 
begins ; the sun is powerful and the days warm. Strong winds from the south. Storms from 
the N. W. towards middle and end, accompanied by violent gusts, with clouds of dust, 
followed by rain. Thermometer 74° to 86', mean 80*. April — South wind moderating 
the heat till the 20th, when the wind becomes hot sometimes. Thunderstorms and 
rain. Thermometer 79** to 91**, mean 85*. May — Very disagreeable. Air close, still and 
oppressive. Nights very sultry, wind light and from south, but storms frequent with 
thunder and rain. Thermometer 81' to 93**, mean 87*. June to September — This is the 
rainy season. In the second week of June the wind veers round to the east and afler 
several days of close muggy weather, the rains commence and continue with little 
intermission till October. The atmosphere during these months b cooler and the weather 
k generally pleasant, but the damp is extreme and everything gets mouldy. Thermometer 
78** to 90**, mean 84°. October — Is a variable month. The rains are breaking up and the 
winds changing. The days are sultry, but the mornings and evenings are cool, the air 
becomes clear and night dews recommence. Mean temperature 79'. A^^w^^r— delight- 
fully fair and pleasant Cold sharp winds blow from the North West The air is dry, 
pure, clear and calm with no clouds. Mean temperature 74'. December — Days clear 
and fine, but fogs at night and early morning. North and west winds prevail, blowing 
sharply. Thermometer 58' to 78% mean 68*. 

Staples and Manufactures. 

Rice, the principal food grain of the people, is cultivated and consumed over the 
whole of Eastern, Western, and Central Bengal and Orissa, and these parts are the prin- 
cipal rice producing tracts. The coarse rice is usually consumed locally, while that 
grown in winter and spring is exported. In Behar and Chota Nagpore also, rice is a main 
staple of food though alternated with wheat, maize and other cereals. Dall (pulses) of 
various kinds, and fruit and vegetables, of every description, form an invariable part of the 
food of the people throughout these provinces. 

The commercial staples are jute, hemp, oilseeds, ginger, turmeric, cotton, cocoa- 
nuts, date-sugar, tobacco, sugar-cane, betel-nut, betel-leaf, indigo, tea, silk, opium, 
lac, lacdye, safflower, saltpetre, cinchona and ipecacuanha. Next to rice, jute forms 
the staple product of the country. The Districts of Bengal which grow it most largely^ 



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The Bengal or Lower Provinces, — Continued. 



59 



are Rungpore, Mymensingh, Bogra, Dacca, Pubna, Dinagepore, Hoogly and 24 Pergun- 
nahs, the best quality coming from Rungpore and Mymensingh. Serajganj is one of the 
principal marts for this staple. The manufacture of date-sugar is very extensively car- 
ried on in the deltaic districts of Jessore, Nuddea, Furreedpore and 24-Pergunnahsk 
Tobacco is largely grown in Rungpore, Tirhoot and Purneah for trade and export Tea is 
cultivated to a greater or lesser extent in Dacca, Daijeeling, Jalpaiguri, Chittagong and 
Chota Nagpore. The following statement gives further particulars in regard to the tea 
cultivation in Bengal, in 1878. 



No. 


Districts. 


No. of 
Plantations. 


Area. 


Yield. 


Per Acre. 


AVCRAGE EutVATION. 


I 
3 
3 
4 

1 

7 


Daijeeling 

Jalpaigon 

Chittagong 

Chittagong Hill Tracts . . 
Dacca 

Hazarihagh 

Lohardugga 


»44 
a9 
39 

a 
6 

4 

3Z 


Acres. 

3,35a 
930 

«.a93 


lbs. 

7,525,980 

199,226 

690,999 

32,000 

3,517 
78,412 


lbs. 

318 
320 
x>5 


300 to 6,500 feet 

400 to 1,000 ,, 

13 to aoo „ 

55 to 60 „ 

13 to 21 „ 

2,325 feet average 
800 to 3,aoo feet. 




Total 


235 


35,708 


8,619,028 







Indigo is largely cultivated in the districts of Nuddea and Jessore, over the whole 
of Central Bengal, in Purneah, and westward throughout Behar north of the 
Ganges, and constitutes the principal industry of these parts. In Behar south of the 
Ganges, the cultivation is very small, and in the Chittagong, Orissa and Chota Nagpore 
divisions it is not grown. The cultivation of opium is a Government monopoly 
and is principally carried on in Behar. Silk is a principal industry over a considerable 
part of the Rajshahye and Burdwan divisions. Cinchona and Ipecacuanha are produced 
in the Darjeeling district All over these provinces the manufacture of beads of sorts and 
wicker and basket work are very generally spread occupations, and the usual local handi- 
crafts are carried on, for the supply of local demands. Weaving and the manufacture 
of cotton thread are the occupation of a large number of the inhabitants of every district 

The different manufactures which are specially carried on in the several divisions of 
the Bengal Provinces, and for which each part is most celebrated, are summed up as fol- 
lows : — 

Burdwan Divtsion. — Silk, indigo and metal pots and pans. Lac, rope and yam 
factories. Screw-presses for cotton, jute and fibres. Steam, flour, paper and jute 
mills. Iron foundries. 

Presidency Division, — Indigo and date-sugar are the staple manufactures in this 
division. The others are cotton-cloth, shell-lime and brass utensils. There are also 
several jute and cotton mills and screw-presses, as well as other factories and foundries. 

Rajshahye Division. — Silk and indigo are the principal manufactiu-es, the others are 
silk cloth, brass utensils, gunny bags, gold and silver filagree work and ivory articles. 

Dacca Division. — There is no manufacture on a wholesale scale in this division 
except tea and indigo ; cocoanut oil and date-sugar are made and exported to Chittagong 
and Calcutta. The other manufactures are brass and iron utensils, lacdye, soap and paper. 

Chittagong Division. — The principal industries are carpentry, ship and boat building, 
blacksmith's, brazier's, gold and silversmith's work. 

Patna Division. — ^The principal manufactures are indigo, opium, saltpetre, sugar, 
and sugar-candy. The minor manufactures, are towelling and table-linen, tobacco, 
paper, blankets and brass utensils. 

Bhagalfur Division, — The principal manufactures of this division are indigo and silk. 



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6o The Bengal or Lower Provinces, — Continued. 

cabinet-ware, fire-arms and hardware ; baskets, inlaid and fancy work are the other in- 
dustries. 

Orissa Division. — Salt manufacture is the staple of this division. Brass vessels, brass 
and silver ornaments and coarse cloths are the chief articles made. 

Cheta Nagpore Division. — Coarse doth, soapstone vessels, tusser-silk, lac and 
tea are the chief articles manufactured. 

Of the mineral resources of Bengal, coal only has been largely developed. Iron, 
however, is at least as abundant as coal in many places, and is found in the closest con- 
junction with coal in large tracts where limestone is also plentiful The largest and best 
coal mines of Bengal are at Raneegunge in the Burdwan District, and in the Chota Nag- 
pore Division, where there are great stores of coal for future ages. Coat is also found in the 
Sonthal Parganas, but of a poorer description. Lead, silver and copper are found in 
Bhagalpur, and stone quarries are worked in the districts of Mongh3rr and Gya. Little is 
known of the mineral resources of Darjeeling. Petroleum and coal are spoken of as 
existing, cq)per and limestone are known to exist Iron ore has been discovered in the 
Salmy^ Hills in Tipperah, and coal in the Chittagong Hill Tracts. Throughout the delta 
and low-lying alluvial tracts comprising the Presidency, Rajshahye and Dacca Divisions, 
and alluvial country of Orissa, there are neither mines nor minerals. In the hilly tracts 
of the tributary mehals further inland, there are valuable beds of iron ore, particularly 
in Taljharee, where iron and coal are found side by side. Rich iron ore is also found 
and worked extensively by natives in the Orissa States of Dhenkanal and Keonjhar 

Form of Administration. 

The Lieutenant-Governor is the chief executive authority in these provinces, which 
for administrative purposes have been divided into nine divisions, embracing 43 districts, 
each division being under the superintendence of a Commissioner, and each district 
under a District Officer, who is the unit of executive administration whether in the Regu- 
lation or Non-Regulation districts, and who, in the one case, is styled Magistrate and 
Collector, and in the other, Deputy Commissioner. The District Officer is the executive 
chief and administrator of the tract of country committed to his charge, and is supreme in 
the district, except in so far as regards the proceedings of the Courts of Justice. Each 
district is again subdivided into tahsUs or sub-divisions, under subordinate magisterial 
and revenue authorities, styled Sub-divisional Officers, who are either Assistants or Magis- 
trates in charge. Sub-divisions are again divided into thanas or police circles, where 
there are also Sub-Deputies to strengthen the execurive influence of Sub-divisional officers. 
In revenue matters, the Commissioners of divisions are in their turn subject to the Board of 
Revenue, in other matters they are directly under the Lieutenant-Governor. The legisla- 
tive authority in Bengal is the council of the Lieutenant-Governor, for the purpose of 
making laws and regulations. The Lieutenant-Governor is president of this council, 
and before any law comes into force, it must have received the assent of the Governor 
General as well as that of the Lieutenant-Governor. The Marine Administration is 
under a Master Attendant, and the affairs of the Port of Calcutta, are entrusted to Port 
Commissioners. The Judicial organization of the whole of these Provinces is entrusted to 
Judges, subordinate to a High Court, whose functions are exclusively judicial 

Calcutta has a special administration of its own, with a separate establishment of 
Police under control of a Commissioner, also Magistrates of Police for administration 
of criminal justice. The affairs of the Municipality and Municip)al Taxation are 
managed by a Chairman and Board of Justices, while the Customs and Stamps are under 
the superintendence of a Board of Revenue. 



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The Bengal or Lower Provinces,— Continued, 6i 

Census, 

The Census of Bengal, which was effected in 1871-72, was the first census of the 
country that had ever been attempted. The computation gave 60,357,141 as the total 
number of persons under the Bengal Administration, far exceeding that of any previous 
estimate, and showing an average density for the whole of the four provinces, of 389 per- 
sons to the square mile. In the United Kingdom the density is 262, in Germany 189, in 
France 180. Separately, the density for Bengal Proper is 481, for Behar 462, for Chota 
Nagpore 141, and for Orissa 377 per square mile. The total population for the four pro- 
vinces is classified as follows : — Christians, Europeans 17,387 ; Eurasians 21,410; Natives 
55,297 ; Hindus 38,843,179; Mahomedans 19,559,017 ; Others 1,860,851. The sexes are 
pretty equally divided, particularly in Bengal Proper, 



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11. 

The Bengal Presidency. 



THE ASSAM PROVINCE; 

Comprising 11 Districts, 



WITH THE 



NATIVE STATES ATTACHED THERETO. 

Under a Chief Commissioner. 



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66 



The Assam Province, — Continued. 



List of the Native Feudatory States and Chiefships^ included in the Province of Assam, 
and Subordinate to that Government, 







Estimated. 




Of Capital 






1877-78. 








Position of 




Under what 
















No. 


States and Chiefships. 


Area 


Popln. 


Reve- 
nue. 


Chief. 


Latde. 

N. 


Longde. 
E. 


X 


Officers. 






Sq. Mis. 




Rs. 








Feet. 




z 


Manipur 

Khasi Hill States, 
{Protected Democracies.) 


7.584 


126,000 


60,000 


Maharajah. 


24° 48' 


94' 0' 


3,619 


Pd. Agent. 


I 


Bhawal or Warbah .. 


\ 


369 


16,000 


Siem. 


25 11 


91 26 




^ 


3 


Cherra or Sohrah 




8,060 


8,650 


do. 


25 17 


91 46 


.. 




3 


Sheila 




5.500 


700 


Wahadadar. 


25 12 


91 41 


.. 




4 


Khyrim or Nong-krcm . . 




20,500 


10,100 


Siem. 


as 43 


91 33? 


.. 




5 


Myliim or Myl-Iiem 




12,266 


i»69o 


do. 




.... 


.. 




6 


Langrin or Lyng-kin 




1,870 


1,030 


do. 




.... 




i 


7 


Maharam (upper and lower) 




6,160 


1.045 


do. 


.... 


.... 


.. 


w 

3 


8 


Maoyang or Maoiong . . 




1.938 


500 


do. 


35 36 


91 S3 


.• 


1 


9 


Maosynram .. 




947 


330 


do. 


.... 


.... 


•• 


1 


lO 


Malaisohmat 




299 


900 


do. 


.... 


.... 


.. 


II 

12 


Marriao 

Nobosophoh or Nong-soh-phoh . . 


1 


2,306 
961 


"5 
130 


do. 
do. 


35 36 
25 26 


91 34 
9t 37 


•• 


13 


Nongkhlao .. 




6,924 


2,060 


do. 


as 41 


91 41 


.. 


•l 


«4 


Nongspung .. 




871 


100 


do. 


as 58 


91 so 


1,837 


1 


«5 


Nongstain .. 




7.763 


10,400 


do. 


as 31 


91 19 


.. 




i6 


Rambrai 




1.737 


440 


do. 


^$ 39 


91 31 




17 


Jirang 




581 


1,630 


Sirdar. 


as 55 


9« 35 


a,4i9 





i8 


Duara Nongtyrmen 




378 


i»7i5 


da. 


.... 




.. 


S 


"9 


Maolong 




i»477 


.... 


do 


as 33 


91 41 






so 


Maodon 




253 




do. 


as 13 


91 36? 






21 


Nonglong 








do.- 


25 21 


91 30 






33 


Kariapara and Charduar 

Jaintia Hills. 
19 Estates .. 


Not Sp 


edfied. 




Sath Rajahs. 




.... 




. 



Notes on the above states. 

There are no Tributary States in direct relation with the Assam administration. Manipur is a dependent stale on the 
Eastern border and under the supervision of a Political Agent acting under the direct orders of the Supreme Government ; 
only in boundary matters has the Chief Commissionei any direct concern in the politics of Manipur. The Military Forces 
of Manipur are : — Artillery 500, Cavalry 400, Infantry 4,400. See ' Outlying Independent States.' 

The Siems and Sirdars of the Khasi Hills hold a sort of semi-independent positbn. Their appointment is subject to the 
confirmation of the British Government, which can remove them in case of oppression or misconduct. The Khasi Hill States 
cover an area of 4,490 square miles. These states keep no Military Forces, nor do they pay any tribute. They are all in> 
subsidiary alliance with the British Government. 



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The Assam Province, — Continued. 



67 



Military Siations^ Eastern Frontier District, 



No. 



Stations. 



Lat. 


Long. 


^ 




N. 


E. 


t 


No. 








feet. 




as' 34' 


91* b6' 


4,951 


XX 


as 76 


92 X4 


4,439 


12 


96 XI 


9« 47 


X34 


13 


84 50 


92 5« 


87 


»4 


06 M 


9a 44 


250 


15 


* 37 


99 50 


303 


x6 


26 31 


94 


349 


»7 


27 99 


94 58 


405 


18 


27 50 


95 42 


470 


19 


87 44 


95 83 




20 



Stations. 



Lat. 

N. 



Long. 
E. 



to nearest minute. 



•? 
S 



ShiDoog (Head Qnarten) 

Jawai 

Gaohati 

Cachar (Sildutf) 

Nowgong . * -. . 

Tezpnr 

Golaghat 

Dibmgarh 

Sadiya 

Pubamukh 



Baxa .. 

Jalpaignxi 

Alinagar 

Chargola 

Noarban4 

Monier Khal 

Manipur 

Samaguting 

Wokha 

Dhubri 



86" 45' 
26 32 
24 II 
24 36 
24 36 

84 35 
24 48 

85 47 
26 6 



89*37^ 
88 46 
9x 56 

91 27 

92 48 
98 59 
94 o 

93 50 

94 18 
90 I 



feet. 
8,076 



2,619 

8,477 

4.766 

158 



BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

Areay Position^ BoundarieSy &c. 

The Province of Assam lies on the north-east extremity of the Indian Empire, with 
Bhutan and Thibet beyond it on the north, and Burmah on the east, and between Latitudes 
28* 15' and 24" o' North, and Longitudes 89" 45' and 97** 5' East, and has an area of 
52,731 square miles. The immediate boundaries of Assam are, on the north, Bhu- 
tan and the range of hills inhabited by savage sub-Himalayan tribes. On the north- 
east are the Mishmi Hills which sweep round the head of the Brahmaputra Valley. On 
the east, are the mountain ranges of the Burmese frontier, and intervening hills inhabited 
by unsubdued wild tribes, the Patkoi range and Manipur Native State. On the south, 
are the Bengal districts of Mymensingh and Tipperah, with Hill Tipperah Native State. 
On the west, it is bounded by the Bengal districts of Rungpore, and Jalpaiguri, and 
the Native State of Cooch Behar. 

The outer boundary on the north of districts Goalpara, Kamrup and Darrang, has 
been accurately laid down and defined, beyond this the outer line of boundary of districts 
Nowgong, Lakhimpur, Sibsagar, Naga Hills and Cachar, touching upon the hills of the 
adjoining wild tribes, is indefinite ; another line of boundary, known as the * Inner line', 
has therefore been laid down for these districts, with the object of restricting the deal- 
ings of Europeans and other British subjects with the wild frontier tribes, no person being 
allowed to cross this inner line without a pass. 

Topography, &c. 

The Province comprises the two valleys of the Brahmaputra (the son of Brahma) 
and Surma rivers, and the central hill tracts of the Garo Hills, the Khasi and Jaintia 
Hills, and the Naga Hills, which separate them. 

Assam Proper, or the valley of the Brahmaputra, is a long alluvial plain about 450 
miles in length, and of an average width of 50 miles, shut in by mountains on the 
north, east and south. The river Brahmaputra flows throughout its entire length, and 
a little above Dhubri bends abruptly to the south, continuing its course to its confluence 
with the Ganges at Goalundo, the present terminus of the Eastern Bengal Railway. Little 



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68 The Assam Province, — Continued. 

is known of the upper course of this river, which has been generally identified with 
the Sangpo or Narichu Sangpo of Thibet In Assam the Brahmaputra is navigable by 
river steamers and large cargo boats as far as Dibrugarh at all seasons of the year, and 
in the rains by steamers even as far as Sadiya, a hundred miles further up ; much beyond 
this place it is not navigable owing to the rapidity of the current At Goalpara, the 
discharge during its lowest ebb, amounts to 146,200 cubic feet per second; during the 
rains it attains a height of from thirty to forty feet above its common level, the discharge 
then has been computed at four times the above quantity. 

The valley of the Surma or Barak river comprises the two districts of Sylhet and 
Cachar. On the north this valley is shut in by the Khasi, Jaintia and Naga Hills, on the east 
by the Manipur Hills, and on the south by the Lushai and Tipperah Hills. The west- 
em and eastern portions of this valley differ considerably in their physical features ; the 
western portion, comprising the district of Sylhet, is for the most part a large alluvial 
plain averaging some seventy miles in width, and traversed by numerous streams and 
water courses, which, during the rainy season from June to October, flood the country. 
In the eastern portion comprising the district of Cachar, the valley narrows. The 
Surma river, (uniting ultimately with the Megna in Bengal), rising among the mountains to 
the north of Manipur, flows for about 180 miles through a mountainous country, and 
becomes navigable only in the plains portion of Cachar. 

The Central Hill tracts of the Naga Hills, the Khasi and Jaintia Hills and the Garo 
Hills, are a continuation of the mountainous chain which sweeps round the head of the 
Brahmaputra valley. Each range has marked physical features of its own. In the 
Naga Hills the main ridge, named the Barail, with its ranges and spurs, is remarkably 
precipitous in character, and towers to a height of 10,000 feet above the sea level The 
peculiar features of the Khasi and Jaintia Hills is the abruptness with which they rise 
on the southern face, almost perpendicularly from the Surma valley, attaining rapidly 
an altitude of over 6,000 feet, the upper plateaux and main central tracts consisting of a 
succession of undulating downs covered mostly with short grass. The hill station of 
Shillong, the seat of Government, is situated about the centre of this tract The Garo 
Hills terminate this chain and present very similar characteristics, being steep and pre- 
cipitous on the southern face and of rather lower general elevation, the highest part 
being not more than 4,700 feet above sea level, and below which Tura the capital is 
situated. 

Climate and Sanataria. 

The climate of Assam is superior to that of Bengal, the day-heat being more mo- 
derate, and the nights being always cool and refreshing. The climate of the hill districts 
in the higher and central plateaux is very salubrious, and the seasons throughout the 
province are generally favorable for agricultural operations. 

At Shillong the average maximum temperature is about 62**, the minimum 59', the 
general mean being about 6^^ The average mean summer temperature in the valleys 
of the Brahmaputra and Surma (or Barak) rivers is 80°, the winter temperature about 
57*, the annual mean temperature being about 70*. 

The rains are of long continuance, lasting from March to October, and cloudless 
skies, proverbially characteristic of India, are but little seen in this province. In the 
Brahmaputra valley, the morning fog, which invariably prevails in the cold season, is a 
special characteristic ; it rises about day-light and often lasts as long as eleven in the fore- 
noon. The annual rainfall at Cherrapoonjee and along the southern face of the Khasi 



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The Assam Province, — Continued. 69 

and Garo Hills, reaches 600 to 620 inches, incessant rain pouring sometimes for eight and 
ten days at a stretch. 

The prevalent winds throughout the year in both valleys blow from the north-east At 
the commencement of the rains a westerly wind occasionally sets in, but rarely lasts for 
any length of time. In Cachar the north-east wind, which blows up to mid-day, 
usuaUy changes to a south-west wind in the afternoon. Diuring the months of March, 
April and May, violent winds from the north-west are of frequent occurrence through- 
out the Province. 

At Cherrapoonjee, in spite of the notorious heavy rainfall, the climate is by no 
means unhealthy. Earthquakes are very common both in the plains and hill districts, 
but the shocks are seldom severe. They occur chiefly in November, December and 
January. Shillong, in the Khasi Hills, is the sanatarium of the Assam Province. 

Staples and Manufactures. 

Rice is the principal food grain throughout the province. Next to rice the most im- 
portant crop is the mustard ; the other staples grown are pulses of various kinds, indian- 
com, linseed, hemp, jute, betel-leaf (pan), betel-nut, sugar-cane, cotton, and tobacco. 
Indigenous arrowroot, and tapioca have also been found in Sylhet The principal pro- 
ducts of the hill districts are, potatoes, oranges, pine-apples, bay-leaves, cinnamon, 
blackpepper, betel-nut and leaves, honey, wax, cotton-silk, and caoutchouc, the three 
former articles being largely exported. 

The most important commercial staple is Tea which is largely cultivated in all the 
plain districts with the exception of Goalpara. The total outturn of manufactured 
tea from lands under tea cultivation at the present time, has been estimated at about 
20,000,000 fts., and the quantity exported is rapidly increasing. The foundation of this 
industry was laid betv^een 1856 and 1859. Coffee is indigenous and is also cultivated. 

Assam is rich in mineral produce. Iron, limestone and coal abound in all the hilly 
tracts. Petroleum springs have also been discovered, and gold has been found in many 
of the streams. 

The common manufactures of the province are silk-thread, silk fabrics, coarse cloth, 
brass utensils, ivory ornaments and ordinary agricultural implements. Sylhet is noted 
for its ivory mats and fans and shell bracelets. There is no lack of materials, but skilled 
labor and industrial energy are both deficient 

In connection with Assam, the annual fairs, held both on political and commercial 
grounds, claim some mention here and are briefly described. 

1. The Udalguri fair, held in the Mangaldai sub-division of district Darrang, about 
10 miles from the foot of the hills. 

This feir takes place commonly in February or March of each year, and lasts about 
two months. The articles brought down from the hills are: — Ponies, sheep, dogs, salt, 
gold, blankets, yak's tails, musk, chillies, spices, wax, honey, madder, oranges and 
walnuts. 

2. The Kerkaria Fair, held in February and March, and established by the Raja of 
Kerkaria in Bhutan, at a place on the Sukmi river, just beyond the border of the Darrang 
district, and about 15 miles north-west of Udalguri. 

3. The Daimara Fair, held about the month of FAruary, at a place three miles 
beyond the British frontier, and distant about 25 miles in a straight line north-east of 
Udalguri. 



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JO The Assam Prouince, — Continued. 

4. The Sadiya Fair, held at Sadiya in January and February of each year. The 
imports at this fair are : — Rubber, wax, musk, cloths, mats, dhaos and ivory. The exports 
are English and Assamese cloths, salt, brass-ware, bell-metal utensils, silver earrings, beads, 
brass-wire and opiunu Sadiya promises to become ultimately a place of considerable 
importance, as it must be the starting point of the as yet unknown route between Assam 
and China. 

The neighbouring hill tribes resort in considerable number to these fairs, and a large 
amount of trade is effected. 

At Silchar too a fair k held in the months of December and January, which is 
largely attended by pony and cattle dealers from Manipur. 

Form of Administration. 

The administration of the Province is carried on under the Non-Regulation system, 
and is entrusted to a Chief Commissioner, acting immediately under the orders of the 
Supreme Government The constitution of the Chief Commissionership was effected 
under a proclamation, dated the 7th February 1874, the district of Sylhet being added to 
the Province from Bengal, by a proclamation dated the 12th September 1874. The 
Chief Commissioner has ordinarily the powers of a local Government, and exercises com- 
plete control over all departments and branches of the administration. The immediate 
and responsible representative of the authority of Government in each district is the 
Deputy Commissioner, who is assisted by Assistant and Extra Assistant Commissioners, to 
whom is allotted such parts of his duties as they are empowered to perform. In the 
Naga Hills district the Chief Executive Officer is called " Political Officer*' in charge of 
the Naga Hills. 

Recently a Commissioner has been appointed for the eight valley districts of this 
province, who is also a sessions Judge, and the channel of communication between the 
District Officers and the Chief Commissioner, and to whom the Deputy Commissioners 
of the valley districts are in certain matters subordinate. 

Census. 

The last Census of 1872 showed a total population of 4,129,972, but it was not fully 
taken in the Naga Hills and in the outlying parts of Lakhimpur, while no census was 
even attempted in the Garo Hills, the figures given being merely estimated. 

Excluding Sylhet and Cachar, the average number of persons per square mile for the 
remainder of the entire province is 63. In calculating the Christian population, the Native 
Chrbtians in the Khasi and Jaintia Hills have not been taken into account 

Considering its small population, Assam presents greater varieties of race than any 
other province. The sexes are pretty equally divided. 

The tribes bordering on the Province are the following : — 



On the North, 

z. The Bhutias. 

2. TheAkhas. 

3. TheDaflaa. 

4. The Miris. 
5- The Abars. 



Oh the Eatt. 

6. The Mishmis. 

7. TheKhamtis. 

8. TheStngphoa. 



On the South. 

9. TheNagas. 

10. TheMDdn. 

zz. TlieKuku. 

Z3. The Lushais. 

*i3. The Sylus. 

*i4. The Howl<»gs. 

*i5. The Shindoos. 



* The three last named tribes arc dans of the Kukis or Lushais, they border the Chittagong and Anakan Hill Tracts, 



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11. 

The Bengal Presidency. 



5. 

THE CENTRAL PROVINCES: 

Comprising 4 Divisions or Commissionerships embracing 19 Districts, 



WITH THE 



NATIVE STATES ATTACHED THERETO. 

Under a Chief Commissioner. 



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The Central Provinces, — Continued. 



17 



List of the Natwe Feudatory States and Zamindari Chief ships included in the Central 
Provinces^ and Subordinate to that Government. 



States ano 
Chiepships. 



Estimated. 



Area 



Popula- 
tion. 



Reve- 
nue 



Position 

of 
Chief. 



f 



I^t. 

N. 



Long. 
E. 



of Capital 



Under what 
Officers. 



' 4 

• 5 

6 

7 

8 

•9 



•«3 
«5 



Bastar, Capital Jagdalpur.. 

Kharond or Kalahandi 
Capital Junagar. 

Raigarh Bargarh 

Borasamfaor (Zamindari) . . 

Pbuljhar ( do. ) .. 

Sarangarh 

Patna, Capital Bolangir . . 

Sonpur 

Rairakhol 

Bamra, Capital Deoghar . . 

Sakti 

Kawardha 

Kondka or Chhnikhadan . . 

Kanker 

Khaiiagarh 

Nandgaon 

Makrai 

*Under British management. 



Total 



Sq. Ms. 
13,062 
3.745 

1,486 
800 

1,000 
540 

a»40o 
906 
833 

1,988 
X15 
887 
174 
639 
940 

905 
ax5 



a8,835 



278,856 
133,483 

63f3oo 
19,200 
3a,7»o 
37tioo 
98,650 

>30.7i3 

x2,66o 

56,600 

8,400 

75t46o 

29,600 

43,550 

122,264 

X48.550 

13,650 



T, 053,836 



Rs. 

92,000 

20,000 

7,500 
3,000 
8,000 

8,oo( 
37.000 
18,000 

6,000 

6,000 
10,000 
99,560 
22,000 
15,000 
117,600 
98,750 
20,000 



5,77,410 



Raja, 
do. 

da 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Maharaja. 

Riga. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

da 

Mahant 

Raja. 

do. 

Mahant. 

Raja. 



3,050 
3.550 



1,350 

600 

5,000 

580 

350 

350 

16,000 

11,000 

47,000 
46,000 



«9' 5 

19 52 

21 54 

ao 56 

21 14 
ai 36 
»o 43 

20 51 

21 X3 

ai 32 

22 X 

22 o 
21 31 

20 16 

21 25 

21 5 

22 4 



82* 4' 

82 59 

83 26 
83 o 

82 54 

83 7 
83 II 

83 59 

84 24 
84 46 
83 o 
81 17 
8x 2 
81 32 
8x I 
81 5 
77 8 



feet. 
1,831 



Dep. Commr. 
Upper Godavari 



2 
i 



I 



Dep. Commr. 
Bilaspur 



Dep. Commr. 
Raipur 



Dep. Commr. 
Hoshangabad 



Notes on the above States. 

The total area of the 15 Feudatory States of the Central Provinces has been estimated at 28,835 square miles, 
their population about 1,053,836 souls, and revenue about Rupees 577,410 or £s. 57,741. These chie6 are almost uncontrolled 
in the administratioo of their territories ; so long as they maintain order, and rule their people without oppressing them, no 
interference in their affurs is exercised by the British Government. Only in the matter of criminal justice are their powers 
circumscribed, confirmation by the Chief Commissioner in cases of severe punishment has to be obtained, and no sentence of 
<leath can be executed by any chief without the sanaion of the Chief Commissioner. Each state is ruled according to its own 
laws and customs, and British law is not in force. The statistics for these states though taken from the latest returns 
available, are sometimes of course only an approximation to the truth, but they serve to shew the relative importance of the 
stales. The Feudatories have no military forces worth naming. 

The Zamindars (see next page) are mostly the representatives of fiunilies fotmded by soldiers of fortune, or jrounger sons 
of nembers of the ruling families : they pay a fixed revenue demand to the Britbh Government. Borasambar and Phuljhar 
formcriy belonged to the cluster of states known as the 18 Gaijhats, but they are now classed among the ordinary Zamindaris 
and are attached to the Sambalpur district. Their area, population and revenue are not included in the totals given above. 



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!i 


7%^ Central Provinces,— Continued. 








i 


Zaminoaris. 


1 


1 


1 


^ 


Zamindaris. 


1 


J 
1 


t 
1 




DUtHci Santial/ur, 


Sq.Ms. 








District Bhandara, 


Sq.M.. 






I 


Ghe« .. 


la 


5,350 


»9 


I 


Amgaon 


146 


21.543 


53 


a 


Kharsal 


12 


4.300 


18 


2 


Anuni 




.. 


2,183 


10 


3 


Kolabira or Taikor 


140 


17,200 


60 


3 


Bijli 
Chichgarh 




i4e 


8.700 


48 


4 


KorabaM 
Loisingh 


la 


a, 336 


■8 


4 




237 


8,370 




5 


>5 


950 


16 


5 


Chikli 








2 


6 


Laira .. 


a6 


4,«5o 


25 


6 


Dalli 




53 


2.330 


»7 


\ 


Machida 


6 


550 


5 


7 


Dangurli 








I 


Fajpur 


30 


a.756 


21 


8 


Dawa .. 




*i6 


4,100 


12 


9 


Rampor 


100 


5.288 


63 


9 


lamri 
Kamtha 






•• 


4 


zo 




"5 


5i,iao 


239 


10 




503 






II 


Barpali 


25 


17,300 


70 


II 


Kanhargaon 








I 


12 


Bhedan or Basaiketa 


15 


7."5 


25 


12 


Kham 








4 


«3 


BesiorUttal 

District Bilaspnr. 


80 


10,696 


28 


"3 
'4 


Karargaon 
Mahagaon 
Nansari 
Palkhera 




3» 
50 




la 


I 


Bhatgaon 


6a 


7,900 


39 


^ 


PalasgaoD 




134 


800 


>4 


a 


Bilaigarh 


109 


7,400 


50 


18 


Parasgaon 






400 


a 


3 


Chhuri 


320 


13,280 


lao 


'9 


Purara 




39 




6 


4 


Champa 


lao 


18,666 


47 


ao 


Rajoli .. 
Tii^heri Malpuri 




43 




>3 


5 


Katangi 


57 


9,400 


38 


31 




15 


>,95o 


7 


6 


Kenda 


a98 


5,160 




22 


Turmapuri 








7 


7 


Korba 


8^3 


27,460 


232 


23 


Umri .. 




>7 


2,a8a 


10 


8 
9 


Lapha 
Madanpur 


a72 
25 


5,700 


55 

44 




District Balaghat. 








lO 


Matin 


569 


2,760 


40 


1 


Bargaon and Bamangaon 






4 


II 


Pandaria 


486 




292 


2 


Bhadra 


ia8 


16,300 


la 


Pendra 


58s 


.. 


165 


3 


Chauria 




25 






13 




43" 


a,590 


39 


4 
5 


Hatta 
Kinhi 




"34 
159 


•• 


■■?J 




District Raipur, 








6 
7 


Kimapar 
Salitekri 




^t. 


ai.aso 


25 

7» 


a 


Barbaspur 
BindraNawagarh .. 


•• 


•• 


22 




DistHct CkoMda. 








3 


Daundi Lohara . . 


.. 


,, 




I 


Ahiri .. 


2,550 


^^ 


,, 


4 


Deori .. 


,, 


,, 


^^ 


2 


Ambagarh Chauki 








.. 


5 


Gandai 


85 


, , 


85 


3 


Aundhi 






,, 


,, 


6 


Gundardehi 




,, 


52 


4 


Chandala 






^^ 


7 


-7 


Kauria .. 


. , 




152 




Dhanoria 






., 


ao 


8 


Khariar 




,, 




5 


DudhmaU 






,^ 


13, 


9 


Khujji 


375 


., 


27 


i 


Gilgaon 








la 


xo 


Lohara 




.. 


132 


Giwarda 






,, 


56 


II 
12 


Narra 
Parpori 


•• 




13 

11 


9 
10 


Ihararapra 
Khutgaon 




•• 




33 
50 


13 


Phiiigeswar 


.. 


,. 


ZI 


Koracha 




., 


,, 


75 


X4 


Silheti 


,, 


,. 


ao 


12 


Kotgal 








18 


15 


Suannar 


.. 


., 


84 


13 






,, 


,. 


25 


x6 


Thakurtola 


• * 


,, 


77 


14 


Palasgarh 
Panabaras 








51 


a; 


Wararband 


,, 






15 






^^ 


300 












16 


Pavi Mutanda 








35 




District Chhindwara, 








;? 


Potegaon 
Rangi .. 








II 
»7 


a 


Adegaon 


.. 


,, 


89 


19 


Sirsundi 








»5- 


a 


Batkagarh 


,, 






81 


20 


Sonsari 








ax 


3 

4 


Bhardagarh 
Chhater . , 


•• 






40 
14 




District Hoshangahad, 








5 


Harai 


,, 






.1; 


I 


Almod .. 






29 


6 


Pratapgarh 








a 


Tachmarhi 






24 


7 


Sonpur 


•• 




49 


3 


Pagan 






10 



Military Stations of the Nagpore Force^ Garrisoned by the Madras Army. 



No. 



Stations. 



Ut. 

N. 



Long. 
E. 



to the nearest minute. 



No. 



Stations. 



Ut. 

N. 



Long. 
E. 



to the nearest minute. 



Kamptee (Hd. Qrs.) 
Chanda 
Hoshangabad 
Raipor 



ai 13 

>9 57 

t9 46 

ai 15 



79 14 

79 2X 

77 45 

81 4Z 



Feet. 

1,130 

657 

1,009 

994 



Seetabuldee 

Sironcha 

Pachmarhi, (Sanitm.). . 

Sumbulpore 



55 



21 9' 
t8 51 

22 a8 
21 23 



79' 8* 

80 o 

78 a8 

84 I 



See page 35 for other Military Stations in the Central Provinces. 



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Central Provinces, — Continued. 7^ 

BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

Area^ Position^ Boundaries, dfc. 
The Central Provinces occupy a vast tract of coiuitry in the centre of the Peninsula 
of India; they lie between the i8th and 25th degrees of North Latitude and 76th and 
86th degrees of East Lontitude, and stretch from. Bundelkhand in the north, to the 
Madras Presidency in the south, and from the frontier of Bengal in the east, to independent 
Malwa and to the Deccan in the west The extreme breadth from north to south is 
about 500 miles, and length from east to west about 600 miles. The area of the whole 
tract so named is 113,043 square miles, of which 84,208 square miles are British territory, 
and the remainder, 28,835 square miles, the territory of Feudatory Native Chiefs. They 
are bounded on the north by the independent native state of Rewah and states of Bun- 
delkhand of the Central India Agency ; on the west and north-west by the British dis- 
trict of Lalitpur of the North-Western Provinces, by Bhopal and Indore native states 
of the Central India Agency, the British district of Khandesh in the Bombay Presidency 
and by Berar, or the Hyderabad Assigned Districts ; on the south and south-east by the 
Nizam's dominions, the Jeypur native state and the Ganjam district of the Madras 
Presidency ; on the east and north east by the tributary states of Orissa and the Garhjat 
states of Chota Nagpore in the Bengal jurisdiction. The Central Provinces are therefore 
enclosed on nearly every side by foreign territory, and are thus cut off geographically 
from other purely British provinces. 

Topography, &c^ 
Geographically the Provinces are divided into two parts by the Satpura range of 
mountains that runs south of the Nerbudda river from east to west. This range em- 
braces within itself considerable tracts of table land Commencing at the lofty plateau of 
Amarkantak, the range extends westwards as far as the western coast From Amar- 
kantak an outer ridge runs south-west for about 100 miles to a part known as the Salitekri 
Hills, thus forming as it were the head of the range, which, narrowing as it proceeds west- 
wards, changes from a broad table land to two parallel ridges bounding on either side the 
valley of the Tapti, ending so far as these provinces are concerned, at the famous hill for- 
tress of Asirgarh. Beyond this point the Rajpipla Hills, which separate the valley of 
the Nerbudda from that of the Tapti, complete the chain as far as the Western Ghats. 
The mean elevation of the range is about 2,500 feet, but many of the peaks and some 
of the plateaux have an elevation of more than 3,500 feet above the sea. The^ plateaux 
of Amarkantak and Chauradadar in the Mandla district rise to a height of nearly 3,500 
feet; the height of the hill of Khamla in the Betul district is 3,700 feet, and the general 
height of the Chikalda hills overlooking the Berar plain, is 3,700 feet, while the Pachmarhi 
hills, east of Betul, rise abruptly from the Nerbudda valley and culminate at Dhupgarh, 
at an elevation of 4,500 feet East of Asirgarh there is a break in the range through 
which the railway from Bombay to Allahabad passes, as well as the road to Central India, and 
at which the elevation is not more than 1,240 feet above the sea. West of Asirgarh the 
range is continued to the Western Ghats by a belt of mountainous country 40 to 5a miles 
m breadth with an average height of about 2^000 feet above the sea, some peaks 
however rising up to 3,000 and 4,000 feet The whole length of the Satpura range is 
scarcely less than 600 miles, while its breadth at the head across Balaghat and Mandla 
is about 100 miles. On the table lands of this range, east of Asirgarh, lie the districts 
of Betul, Chhindwara, Seoni, Balaghat and Mandla. 



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8o Central Ptouinces, — Cantinaed. 

North of the Satpura range, offshoots of low hills stretch northwards and approach 
the Khaimur Hills, which with the Bhanrer Hills (both branches of the Vindhyan range), 
form the eastern scarp of the plateau on which lie the districts of Damoh and Saugor ; 
these ranges attain a height of 2,500 feet 

Eastwards from Amarkantak to within a few miles of the eastern coast of the Penin- 
sula of India, stretch a succession of ranges of hills, offshoots of the Vindhyan chain, 
separating the plain of Sambalpur from Chota Nagpore. 

To the south the provinces are shut in by the wide mountainous tract of Bastar, 
stretching from the Bay of Bengal to the Godavari river, and extending from the west of 
that river up to the rocky ridges and plateau of Khandesh, and enclosing the plain of 
Berar along its southern border. 

The plain country of the province may be said to lie in two great divisions to the 
north and south of the great central range of mountains. North of the Satpuras we 
have the rich valley of the Nerbudda, extending from the Jubbulpore to the Hoshangabad 
and Nimar districts, a distance of nearly 350 miles ; the elevation of this valley fells from 
1,400 feet at Jubbulpore to 1,120 feet at Hoshangabad. In breadth it is about 30 miles. 
This great plain is most fertile and is cultivated with wheat, cotton and sugar-cane. 
South of the Satpuras and the ranges that run eastwards, we have the plain of Sambalpur 
with all its Native states and Zamindaris extending over an area of some 23,000 square 
miles, and which may be considered the central basin of the Mahanadi Separated from 
Sambalpur by ranges running southward from the great central chain, lies the plain of 
Chhattisgarh, having a mean elevation of 1,000 feet and an area of about 22,000 square 
miles, and forming the upper basin of the Mahanadi Further to the west, and again 
divided off by hills, is the great plain of Nagpur, extending over some 21,000 square miles. 
The general surface of this last plain inclines towards the south, from 1,000 feet above 
the sea at N^pur, to 750 feet at Chanda, the eastern portion being drained by the Wain- 
ganga, the western by the Wardha. 

The principal rivers which with their tributaries drain this wide region are : the Nerbud- 
da, which, rising in the high table land of Amarkantak, and pursuing a direct westerly 
course for 500 miles to the Gulf of Cambay, receives the whole drainage of the 
northern slopes of the Satpuras ; this river is almost everywhere fordable in the hot 
season ; the Mahanadi, rising in the wild mountains of Bastar that close in the 
Chhattisgarh plain to the south ; the Wainganga rising in the Seoni plateau, and 
draining the southern slopes of the Satpuras west of Mandla, and also the greater 
part of the Nagpur plain ; the length of this river from its source to its junction with 
the Wardha is about 350 miles ; the Wardha rising in the Satpuras between Nagpur 
and Betul, and separating the districts of Nagpur, Wardha, and Chanda from Berar and 
the Nizam's dominions. These four great rivers are navigable for long distances during 
the rains, and they flow in deep beds many feet below the level of the countries which 
they drain. 

Generally, the Central Provinces may be said to be a mountainous country, in which 
hill and plain, plateau and valley alternate with each other. The slopes on both sides 
of the great central ranges are covered with dense forest, but in the other parts of the 
provinces the absence of this forms a characteristic feature of the scenery. 

Several lines of railway run through the Central Provinces. The Great Indian 
Peninsula Railway, main line, enters the territory at Burhanpur, in the district of Nimar, 



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The Central Provinces, — Contintied. 8i 

terminating at Jubbulpore, where it connects with the " Jubbulpore Extension" of the East 
Indian Railway, which enters the provinces at Undarra station ; the Nagpur branch of the 
Great Indian Peninsula line, branches off from it at Bhosawal, and after traversing Berar, 
reaches Nagpur, after throwing off a branch line at Wardha station to Warora, vid. Hingan- 
ghat, a length of 45 miles, called the " Wardha Valley State Railway." The Holkar 
State Railway to Mhow and Indore, branches off from Khandwa station of the Great 
Indian Peninsula line, while a small branch from the Gadarwara station of the same line 
connects the town of MopanL The extension from Nagpur to Kaliani, a distance of 125 
miles, called the " Nagpur and Chhattisgarh State Railway" is now under construction 
and progressing rapidly. 

Climate and Sanaiaria. 
A hilly coimtry, such as has been described, lying within the tropics andat a con sider- 
able distance from the sea, would naturally have a hot and dry climate. The tempera- 
ture is to some extent, however, modified by the general elevation of the country. The 
southwest monsoon, which prevails from the end of June to the beginning of Septem- 
ber, usually brings with it an abundant rainfall, and the wide tracts of forest that cover 
a part of the area of the provinces, retard evaporation. But notwithstanding these modi- 
fying influences, the marked characteristics of the climate for nine months of the year, 
are a high temperature and a low degree of humidity. The districts above the Satpuras 
have a temperature more nearly approaching that of the North- Western Provinces, while 
the Satpura plateau districts, have, from their superior elevation, a somewhat cooler 
dimate. The hot season begins in April and lasts to the middle of June, the wet sea- 
son then sets in and continues till the middle of October, while the cold season lasts from 
the middle of October to March inclusive. During the hot weather the heat at noon 
averages 100*' Far. In the cold season the mean temperature is 40°. The mean annual 
rainfall of the Central Provinces is 45 inches, of which 41 inches fall during the monsoon 
or wet season, from June to October. The arrival of the monsoon occurs with great uni- 
formity over the whole country, usually about the middle of June. The north-easterly 
and easterly winds set in in October and continue steadily in this direction through 
November and part of December, when they slacken, but continue blowing until the begin- 
ning of February : in February and March, the wind is variable but southerly winds are 
most frequent ; the north-west wind continues from April till June, when, the monsoon 
setring in, the general direction is west and south-west. Pachmarhi, situated in the 
Hoshangabad district, is the Sanitarium of the Central Provinces. 

Staples and Manufactures. 

The ordinary natural productions are cotton of the finest quality, rice, wheat, maize, 
millet, oil seeds, opium, sugar-cane, safflower and indigo. The cotton country of the 
Central Provinces lies on the left bank of the Wardha river, on which bank the well- 
known cotton mart of Hinganghat is situated. Lac abounds in the forests, which swarm 
with wild animals of the kinds found elsewhere in India. The mineral resources include 
iron ore, coal, marble and building stone, gold and diamonds. The forests contain 
valuable Umber trees and plants yielding drugs, resins, gums, and dyes. 

There are no manufactures peculiar to the Central Provinces except perhaps the tis- 
sue work of Burhanpur, and the richly embroidered wearing apparel manufactured in parts 
of Nagpur and Bhandara. The ordinary manufactures are weaving, iron smelting and 
shaping the same into agricultural implements. 



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82 The Central Provinces, — Continued. 

Form of Administration. 
The administration of the Central Provinces is carried on under the non-regula- 
tion system, by a Chief Commissioner in direct subordination to the Government of 
India, the Government resolution constituting the Chief Commissionership being dated 
2nd November 1 86 1. The Chief Commissioner has ordinarily the powers of a local 
Government, and exercises complete control over all departments and branches of the 
administration, the courts, Civil and Criminal, being separately controlled by a Chief 
Judge under the name of Judicial Commissioner. For administrative purposes the 
Central Provinces are divided into four divisions, each* controlled by a Commissioner, 
and subordinate to Commissioners are 19 Deputy Commissioners, each holding execu- 
tive charge of a district In every district there are two or more subdivisions, the direct 
management of each being entrusted to a native Sub-collector called a Tahsildar. There 
are 50 such subdivisions in the 19 districts of the Central Provinces. 

Census. 
A general census of the population of the Central Provinces was taken on the 25th 
January 1872. This was the second regular census, the first having been taken in No- 
vember 1866. The total area being 113,043 square miles, and including the Feudatory 
States, the population according to the new census, 10,304,070, the number of persons 
per square mile is 90-5. If, however, the Khalsa or British Territory be separated firom. 
the Feudatory states, the figures are : — 

Area. Population, Density. 

Khalsa ... 84,208 square miles 9,251,234 109 per square mile. 

Feudatory States 28,835 „ „ 1,052,836 36 „ „ 

The entire population in 1866 was 9,104,511 souls. The recent census gives aiv 
increase of 1,198,559, or of 2*04 per cent in five years. The sexes are nearly equally 
divided. 

The census of 1872 was in every respect more detailed and complete than the 
enumeration of 1866, and is sufficiently accurate for all statistical purposes. The 
population of these provinces is classified as follows : — 10,487 Christians, 240,965 
Mahomedans, 6,518,137 Hindus, 36,651 Parsis, Buddhists and Jains, 2,444,994 Aborigines, 
and others. 



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II. 

The Bengal Presidency, 



e. 

THE BRITISH BURMAH PROVINCE: 

Comprising 3 Divisions or Commissionerships, embracing 16 Districts, 



WITH THE 



NATIVE STATES ATTACHED THERETO. 

Under a Chief Commissioner. 



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The British Burmah Province, — Continued. 



^ 



1877^8. 

4 DISTRICTS. 

x8 Sub-Divisions. 



Lat. N. ) of District capital 
Long. E. j 
Height in feet.. 



to nearest minute. 



District Statisties^ 

Area in Square Miles 
Number of Villkges 
Population 

„ Pfer Square Mile.. 
Land Revenue . . Rs. 

Average Rainfall in Inches . . 



Classi^ficmHon of Pofulation. 



{Europeans 
Eastlndiaos 
Natives 
Hindus 

Mabomedans .. 
Buddhists and Jains . . 
Aborigines 
Others 



Total 




''Including the Hill Tracts the area of Northern Avakan is 5,696 square miles, f.#., Plains 1,2x3 square miles, Hills 4,483 
square miles, lotal 5,696 square miles. 

Military Stations of the British Burmah Division^ garrisoned' by the Madras Army, 



No. 


Stations. 


1 


Lot. N. 


LongE. 


Height. 


d 
25 


Stations. 






Lat. N. 


Long.E. 


Height. 




to nearest minute. 




to nearest minute- 




a 
3 
4 


RanKDon(Hd. Qxs.) .. 
Maulmaih 

Port-Blair, Andamans . . 

Nancowry Nicobor 

Islands .. 


In. 
Tia 

m6 
xoi 


i6' 46' 
x6 ap 
II 41 
8 


96- 12' 
97 40 

92 4P 

93 46 


feet. 

I 

78 


1 

7 


Shwegyeng .. 
Thayetmyo .. 
Toungngoo . . 


In. 
«55 

50 
70 


17* 55' 
zo aa 
18 57 


^ 56' 

95 " 

96 94 


feet. 
ia8 
»34 
170 





Chief ship included in the 1 


Mtish 


Burmah Province under the Chief Commissioner, 


No. 


Statb and. Ckxbfship. 


Area. 


Pophi. 


Rev. 


Position. 


Caste. 


TVibnte. 


Under whom. 


s 
* 

3 


Western Karengnee .. v 

Eastern Karengnee .. ( 

(Red Karen Country), f 

Gaikho Territory .. J 


u n 


know 


n. 


Chief 
Do. 

Do. 


Heathen. 
Do. 

Do. 


None. 
Do. 

Do. 


I The Commissioner, 



Rangoon, Area^ Population^ Revenue 6^^, ^t'c,,, 1877-78. 



Area in Square mifcs, Town .. 

Popniadon 

Number per square mile 

CUusification of Population,. {J'ovm.Y 
Europeans 
East Indians 
Natives . . 
Hindus 
Mabomedans 
Buddhists and Jains 
Aborigines 



Tovm, 

Men 31,309 

Women aXf3«9 

Children ) Male ai,75o 
under 12 f Female 17.070 



9«.45« 
7,621 

628 
3.342 

9,786 

9.280 

66,342 

987 



Revenue. 
(Ti>wn.) 



/'Land 

Excise, Suburbs included j 

Stamps 

Registration 

Road Cess 
^Mumcipal T&xes 



Number of Police 

Cost of Officials and Police . 



7,35»8a6 

.. .46 
. 83,870 



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«8 Tfie British Burmah Province,— Continued. 

BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

Area, Position, BoundarieSy &c. 

The Province of British Burmah extends along the eastern shore of the Bay of 
Bengal, and lies between the parallels of 22'' o' and 10^ o' North, and longitudes 92' 10' 
and 99** 30' East, the extreme length of this stretch of country being about 1,000 miles, 
and the total area 87,456 square miles, of which about 4,000 only are cultivated. It is 
bounded on the south and west by the Bay of Bengal, and a part of the Chittagong district 
of Bengal, and on the north and east by the independent kingdoms of Burmah and Siam. 

The province is composed of the tracts of Arakan, Tenasserim and Pegu. 
Arakan and Tenasserim were ceded to the British Government after the first 
Burmese war of 1825-26, while Pegu was not annexed to the British dominions until 
after the second Burmese war of 1852. 

The portion known as the Kareng Hill Tracts, is a division of the Toungngoo 
district ; it was formed in 1876, and lies to the eastward of the Sittoung river^ 

Topography, &c., 

The British Burmah Province is geographically divided into four portions, viz : — 
* Arakan, stretching from the Naaf estuary, (which separates the province from Chittagong), 
to Cape Negrais ; * The Valleys of the Irrawaddy and Sittoung rivers, separated from 
Arakan on the west, by the Arakan Yoma range of. hills, and from each other by the Pegu 
Yoma range; * The Valley of the Salween ; and * Tenasserim, which last is a narrow strip 
like Arakan reaching down to the Pakchan stream, and separated from Siam by a lofty 
chain of hills running north and south, nearly parallel to the coast, and about thirty or 
forty miles inland, but approaching nearer to the sea at its southern extremity. A large 
portion of British Burmah consists of mountainous tracts, almost wholly uninhabited, and 
of impenetrable jungle. 

The Arakan portion, from the Naaf estuary to cape Negrais, is bounded on the north 
and east, by the high chain of mountains extending in a southerly direction from the 
south-eastern extremities of Sylhet and Cachar, and gradually diminishing till it ends 
fifteen oc sixteen miles south-east of the rocky promontory of cape Negrais at Pagoda 
point This chain, though of considerable height to the north, diminishes in altitude as 
it reaches Arakan, none of the passes across it, in that portion of its length, being more 
than 4,000 feet above the sea, the Ayeng pass into the valley of the Irrawaddy is much less. 
From the Naaf estuary to Kyouk-phyoo harbour, the coast is a labyrinth of creeks and 
tidal nullahs, and from this point to cape Negrais, it is rugged and rocky, offering few 
harbours for ships. This coast is studded with fertile islands, the largest of which are 
Cheduba, Shahpuri and Ramree. 

Owing to the nearness to the coast of the range which bounds Arakan, there are no 
large rivers, the principal ones are, the Naaf estuary about thirty miles in length and 
three miles broad at its mouth, shallowing considerably towards the head ; the Neroo 
river, an arm of the sea extending more than fifty miles inland, and from three to four 
miles broad at its mouth ; the Koladyne or Arakan river rising in the Lushai Hills, and 
navigable for forty miles by vessels of three to four hundred tons burden, and on the right 
bank of which, close to its mouth, is situated the town of Akyab, the head quarters of 
the district of that name and of the Arakan Division. The approach to Akyab is dan- 
gerous and difficult, the channel being narrow, and with only 3>^ fathoms of water over 
the bar at low water. The other rivers are the Talak^ the Ayeng^ the Sandoway^ the 



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The British Burmah Province, — Continued. 89 

Toungngpo and the Gwa^ the last named being a good haven for steamers or vessels of 
from nine to ten feet draught. The soil throughout Arakan is alluvial, mixed in places 
with sand ; the islands are of volcanic formation, and though rocky, are fertile. 

7%^ Valleys of the Irrawaddy^ Sittoung and Salween rivers are British territory only 
in their lower portions, the two first named unite and form an extensive plain stretching 
from cape Negrais on the west, to Martaban on the east The water-shed between these 
two streams is the Pegu Yoma range, terminating in low hills at Rangoon. The Poung- 
loung range, rising to a height of 7,000 feet, bounds these valleys on the east The north- 
em boundary line separating the British possessions from the territory of the King of 
Burmah, leaves the Arakan hills at a point called the " ever visible peak, " and running due 
east, passes the river Irrawaddy at its 50th mile, and the Pegu Yoma range, forty-three 
miles further on, thence, after thirty-three miles, it crosses the Sittoung river, finally losing 
itself in a desert of mountains thirteen or fourteen miles further east The plains portion 
of these two valleys is highly cultivated and the richest part of the whole province. 
Owing to the spurs thrown out by the Pegu Yoma range, the main valleys are divided 
into several smaller ones. A strip of country in the Sittoung valley on the west, about 
twenty-five or thirty miles broad, is covered with dense jungle, which stretches down as far 
south as Shwegyeng. The coast line from cape Negrais to the gulf of Martaban is low 
and flat 

The main rivers in this portion of the Province are the Irrawaddy^ flowing from the 
frontier line for 240 miles to the sea, and the Sittoung^ rising far north of British territory, 
which it enters just above Toungngoo. As the Irrawaddy nears the coast it divides, con- 
verting the lower portion of its valley into a net-work of tidal creeks ; its first branch, be- 
ing sent off to the westward a little above Henzadah, flows past Bassein and enters the 
Bay of Bengal by two main mouths. This branch is navigable by large ships for eighty 
miles, or as far as to Bassein, a port of some importance. After passing Henzada another 
branch flows off" to the eastward, joining the Hieing river just above Rangoon. The main 
river then divides and sub-divides till it empties itself into the sea by no less than ten 
mouths. The waters of the Irrawaddy commence to rise in March and continue to rise 
till September, (flooding the surrounding lowlands), when they begin to fall The Irra- 
waddy is navigable for river steamers as far as to Bhamo, 600 miles beyond the British 
frontier. The velocity of its waters, when the river is full, is five miles an hour. The 
Sittoung is narrow up to Shwegyeng, below this place it widens, at first gradually then 
very rapidly, and at last flows into the gulf of Martaban, A bore, with a curling crest 
nine feet high, sweeps up the Sittoung river, its effects being felt at Shwegyeng. The 
other rivers are the Hieing^ rising close to Prome, and navigable for vessels of the largest 
size to some little distance above Rangoon ; the Pegu and the Poozoondoung rivers, rising in 
the Yoma range, about flfty-eight miles above the town of Pegu ; the Beeling, rising in 
the Poungloung hills, and entermg the gulf between the Salween and the Sittoung ; the 
Salween^ at the mouth of which stands the town of Maulmain ; the Attaran rising in the 
chain of hills that form the boundary between the kingdom of Siam and British Burmah ; 
and the Gyne which is navigable for about one hundred and eighty miles for small boats. 
The Salween, though a large river is not navigable owing to its rapids. 

The Yoma ranges are composed mainly of brown or grey-slate clay, alternating with 
beds of sand-stone, assuming at times a basaltic character. 

The southern portion of this Province called Tenasseritn^ which includes the Moscos 
and the Mergui Archipelago, lies along the coast between 17" and 10' north latitude, and 
is bounded on the east, from thiity to forty miles inland, by a chain of hills in some 



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90 The British Burmah Province, — Continued. 

places 5,000 feet in height. The breadth of this chain at Martaban has never been 
ascertained, but near Tavoy it appears to be about forty miles wide, whence it gradually 
narrows to ten miles near MerguL The coast line is very irregular and low for some miles 
inland, beyond which the surface of the country is mountainous, thinly populated and 
much intersected by streams. The chief rivers are the Tavoy and Tenasserira. I'he 
Tenasserim, named after the town, rises in about 15** north latitude and flows 
through a valley scarcely broader than its bed; it is navigable for about 100 miles. The 
mouth of the Tavoy river affords excellent anchorage for ships, and vessels can anchor 
along the coast at all times during the north-east monsoon. The soil of the northern 
portion of Tenasserim is alluvial Stratified sand-stone is the prevailing rock interspersed 
with veins of quartz, in which crystals of great beauty are sometimes discovered. The 
chief formation of the small hills is laterite. 

The communications throughout the province are mainly by water. A State Railway, 
163 miles in length, runs from Rangoon to Prome, called the * Rangoon and Irrawaddy 
Valley* line, and steamers ply on the Irrawaddy between Thayetmyo, Prome, Mya- 
noimg, Henzada and Rangoon. There is steam communication from Calcutta vid Chit- 
tagong and Akyab to the southern stations of Arakan, and to Rangoon and Maulmain, 
also south to Tavoy and MerguL A navigable canal connects the Pegu and Sittoung rivers, 
and a complete project for the ' Rangoon and Sittoung Valley* State Railway, to attract the 
whole of the trade with Karengnee and the Shan states, has been submitted for 
sanction. The whole of the Sal ween Hill Tracts is a wilderness of mountains, and it is 
through these hills that Shan Caravans come down annually to Rangoon and Maulmain^ 
and except the routes used by them, there are no roads over which laden animals can pass. 

There are four large lakes or more properly lagoons, which deserve mention, viz,^ the 
Moo lake in the Henzada district, two and a half miles across ; the Lahgyin ; the 
KLandangyee, or " Royal Lake " near Rai^oon, and the clear water lake in the Bassein 
district 

Climate and Sanataria. 

The climate of Burmah, though moist and depressing for a part of the year, is coofer 
than India. In some of the forest tracts, during the monsoons, it is deadly, but on 
the coast, and on the frontier, it is by no means unhealthy, and is much better adapted to 
the European constitution than any part of India. The registration returns show, that the 
deaths of children under five years of age, are in the proportion of 27*85 of the total 
death-rates, the percentage of children under 12 years of age being 35^8 of the whole 
population. In its pluvial character this province is most characteristic and remarkable. 
The rainfall varies considerably, from 218 inches at Sandoway to 50 inches at Thayet- 
myo, the wet-season lasting from May to October, during which time the rains are almost 
constant November, December, January and February are the cold months, while the 
hot weather lasts from February till the rains commence again. The average tempera- 
ture is greatly affected by the sea breeze. The thermometer ranges firom 65° in winter 
to 90"* in summer. 

There are no sanataria in Burmah ; many proposals have been made to found them 
on the high mountain ranges, but, however pleasant they would be in summer, " they 
would have to be abandoned in the rains, for not even natives could remain to take care 
of the buildings ; so incredibly rapid and luxurious is the vegetation, that the very next 
year a forest would have to be cleared away to find the houses again. " 



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The British Burmah Province, — Continued. 91 

Staples and Manufactures. 

The industry of British Burmah is almost exclusively devoted to agriculture. About 
86 per cent of the whole area of the province is devoted to rice, and only about 3 per 
cent of the acreage to cotton, tobacco, sugar-cane, pepper, indigo and other produce, the 
cold weather crops of India being almost unknown here. The whole province is well 
adapted for a much more systematic and extensive production of many staples than the 
Burmese will ever take into consideration. Tobacco growing in northern Arakan is 
attracting notice. According to native calculations the average production of tobacco in 
Arakan is 37olbs. an acre, but experience has shown that the yield of properly cultivated 
ground would be Soolbs. an acre. The tobacco producing soil is so rich that no rotation 
of crops is necessary, and beyond a little weeding, the plantations require only occa- 
sional manual labor. The crop is sown in November and reaped in April. The 
largest tobacco growing district in Burmah is Thayetmyo. Experiments have also 
been made in tea and coffee planting, but with little result, for although in many parts 
of the province the soil and climate are no doubt favorable, the difficulty of pro- 
curing the labor that would be required for these commercial staples has hitherto proved 
insuperable. Tea of very good quality grown in Arakan, is said to be worth about 3X. a lb. 
in the London market The principal manufacturing industries are rice cleaning, timber 
sawing, silk and cotton weaving, boat building, and the manufacture of salt and gnapee^ a 
preparation of fish. Other manufactures are comparatively insignificant, though in 
some respects interesting, and in many instances by no means devoid of artistic merit 
Cutch, used for dyeing purposes, is almost the only article manufactured for export. At 
Rangoon, Maulmain, Akyab and Bassein, there are numerous steam rice mills and 
saw mills for cleaning rice and sawing timber for export 

The metalliferous minerals of the province are confined principally to the Mergui 
and Tavoy districts of the Tenasserim Division, where lead, iron, copper and antimony 
are met with, as well as gold dust in the Shwegyeng river. Petroleum is met with to 
some extent in the Akyab and Kyouk-phyoo districts, and limestone in Kyouk-phyoo, 
Bassein, Amherst and Thayetmyo districts. Coal of inferior quality is found up the 
Tenasserim river in Mergui, and in the Thayetmyo district 

No emigration takes place firom British Burmah, but there is considerable immi- 
gration. Shans firom the Burmese and Chinese Shan states, and other laborers from 
Upper Burmah, come down in large numbers, by whole villages at a time, during the 
harvest season, after which they retmrn, some few settling permanently. Laborers 
also come over in considerable numbers firom Madras, Chittagong and Akyab to the 
southern part during the rice shipping season, but few remain after it is over. 

Form of Administration. 

The three divisions comprising the province of British Burmah, m., Arakan, Pegu 
and Tenasserim, firom the rime of their coming under British rule up to January 1862, 
were governed separately by their respective commissioners, under the control of the 
Supreme Government in the case of Pegu and Tenasserim, and under that of the Lieu- 
tenant-Governor of Bengal in the case of Arakan. In January 1862, however, these three 
divisions were amalgamated and formed into a Chief Commissionership (under Major- 
General Sir Arthur Phayre) in direct subordination to the Government of India, the 
Chief Commissioner having the powers of a local Government, and exercising, as in the 
Central Provinces, complete control over all departments and branches of the adminis- 



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92 



The British Burmah Province, — Contintied. 



tration, the courts being controlled by a Chief Judge named the Judicial Commissi^ 
appointed in January 1872. 

For administrative purposes this province is divided into three divisions, each con 
ed by a Commissioner subordinate to the Chief; subordinate to the Commissioners! 
sixteen Deputy Commissioners, each holding executive and judicial charge of a disti 
under whom are numerous other officials, both executive and judicial, in charge of 
one hundred and fourteen sub-divisions into which the several districts have been divid 
There are 18 sub-divisions in the four districts of the Arakan Division, 55 in the six i 
tricts of the Pegu Division, and 41 in the six districts of the Tenasserim Division. 

Census. 
A census was taken of the province of British Burmah on the 15th August 
and by it the population was computed to be 2,747,148 souls, or males 1,435,518, femi 
1,311,630, the former exceeding the latter by 123,888, this disproportion being due to 1 
fact, that most of the Hindoo males are aliens, who are only temporary residents and h^ 
not their families with them. According to a census taken for revenue purposes In i8| 
the total population of British Burmah was computed to be, 2,942,605 souls. In 
Administration Report for 1877-78, the population is given as 3,011,614, as shown] 
statement given at page 10. 



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II. 

The Bengal Presidency. 



r. 

BERAR, OR THE HYDERABAD 
ASSIGNED DISTRICTS : 

Comprising 2 Divisions or Commissionerships, embracing 6 Districts, 

WITH 

HYDERABAD (THE NIZAM'S TERRITORY) 

orTHEDECCAN. 

Under a Resident, Hyderabad, and Chief Commissiotier* 



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96 Berar, or The Hyderabad Assigned Districts,— Continued. 

BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

BertTi Eastern and Western, known as the Hyderabad Assigned Districts, forms 
the northernmost portion of the Hyderabad native state. This tract was assigned to the 
British Govemmenti mider the treaties of 1853 and 1861, in pledge for debts incurred 
by a former Nizam, during the early struggles for the sovereignty of the Deccan on 
the dissolution of the Mogal empire, and for the maintenance of the military force termed 
the Hyderabad or the Nizam's Contingent, raised in lieu of the troops which the Nizam 
bad been previously bound to furnish on demand in time of war. This assigned portion 
is situated between longitudes 76' o' and 79' 15' East, and latitudes 19' 30' and ai* 4S' 
North, and is about 150 miles in length from north-west to south-east, and about 144 
miles in breadth from north to south, with an area of 1 7, 7 1 1 square miles, and a population 
of 2,227,654 souls, giving an average of 126 persons per square mile for the whole tract 
Berar is bounded on the north and east by the districts of Nimar, Betul, Nagpur and 
Wardha of the Central Provinces, and on the south and west by the remainder of the 
Nizam's Dominions known as Hyderabad, and the district of Khandesh of the Bom- 
bay Presidency. Although entirely under British administration, the nominal sovereignty 
of the country is still retained by the Nizam. 

The Ajanta range of hills intersects the whole province from west to east, and its 
steep ridge divides the interior geography of Berar into two systems. Setting aside the 
Melghat or Gangra mountain tract, of the Gawilgurh hills, as abnormal, we have two 
distinct sections of Berar, the Payanghat or lowland country, with an average height of 
1,000 feet, bounded on the north by the Gawilgurh hills, and on the south by the outer 
scarps of the Ajanta range \ and the Balaghat^ or upland country above the Ajanta 
ridge, sloping down southward beyond the ghats or passes which lead up to it The 
mass of the Gawilgurh hills or Melghat mountain tract, which may be said to wall in 
Berar on the north, attains elevations varying from 2,000 to upwards of 4,000 feet, the highest 
summit, Bairat, being 4,200 feet It forms the outermost southern barrier of the Sat- 
pura range, and rises abruptly from the plain of Berar or the Payanghat On these 
hills the plateau of Chikalda, the sanitarium of Berar, is situated. It is distant 20 miles 
from Ellichpur. 

The principal rivers of Berar are the TapH for a short section of its course, die 
Wardha skirting its eastern boundary, the Penganga skirting very nearly the whole 
of its southern boundary, and the Puma. There is but one lake (n the whole 
province, the remarkable salt water lake of Lonar, situated on the most southerly plateau 
of the Buldana district This lake presents the appearance of an enormous crater of an 
extinct volcano, and deserves mention as being one of the most prominent, curious and 
interesting physical features of Berar. 

The population of this province is dense, its ndnlGdl regular and copious, and its 
area almost entirely cultivated, the whole of the plain sur&ce being covered over at 
harvest time by a sheet of crops. It possesses one of the richest and most extensive 
cotton fields in India, and several cotton marts of the very first calibre, and in respect 
to natural and material advantages it surpasses any tract in the Central Provinces. A 
group of beds of thick coal of fair quality has lately been found in the Wun district, 
and iron ore is very plentiful throughout large tracts on the eastern side, especially in the 
hills about Karinja, and among the low ranges close to Amraoti on the north-east 

The Resident at the court of Hyderabad stands in the position of Chief Commissioner 
of Berar, and is the head of the local administration, directly subordinate to the 



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Bemr, or Th$ Hydemtbad Aasigneif DiatrictSf^Cpniinmf. 9; 

Cqyemment of Indi^ For administrative purposes, Berar is <}ivided into two divisions^ 
each controlled by a Commissioner. Subordinate to Commissioners are sij( Deputy 
CommissioperSi each holding executive charge of a district, under whom are fifteen Assist* 
ant Commissioners, and eight Elxtra Assistant Commissioners, in executive charge of the 
twenty-two Sub-Divisions of the six districts, the average area of each Sub-Division being 
about 810 square miles^ 

The last censusof Berar was takenin November 1867 ; theproportionof malesto females 
is equal, and Mahomedans constitute only seven per cent of the whole population, which is 
classified a^ follows :— Cbii«tians84i; Hindus 1,883,242 ; Mahomedans 168,283 ; Parsis^ 
Buddhists and Jains 6,604 1 Aborigines 168,684. Total for the whole Province 2,827,654. 

Hyderabad (The Nizam's Territory) or The Deccan. 

The Nizam's Domimons, called also Hyderabad Native State, from the name of its 
capital, is the same as the Subhat of the Deccan of Mogal times, and forms by fyx the 
largest and most important of the protected native states of India. This territory occupies 
the central portion of the table land of the Deccan, a term which in its limited sense 
implies the tract of country in Southern India, situated between the Nerbudda and Kistna 
rivers, and supported by the Eastern and Western Ghats. Hyderabad is situated between 
latitudes 15' 10' and 21* 45' North, and longitudes 74' 40' and 81" 32' East, It is about 
475 miles in length from south-west to north-east and about the same distance in^breadth. 
The area b estimated at nearly 98,000 square miles, with a population of about 1 1 millions, 
giving an average of r 12 souls to the square mile. The territory is bounded on the north 
and east by Berar and the Central Provinces, on the south by the territory subject to the 
Presidency of Madras, and on the west by the territory subject to the Presidency of 
Bombay, and is traversed and skirted by the river Godavari with its tributaries the Puma 
and Manjira ; by the Pranhita with its tributaries the Wardha and Penganga ; and by the 
Kistna with its tributaries the Bhima and Tungabhadra, all flowing from the Western 
Ghats eastwards into the Bay of Bengal The whole territory is an elevated table land, in 
some parts rising to upwards of 2,500 feet above sea level, and is to a large extent covered 
with low brushwood and uncultivated, but where irrigated and cultivated the soil is fertile 
and produces large crops of cotton, wheat, the pulses, rice, and oil seeds, and date and 
palm trees are common everywhere. 

The capital of the state stands on the southern or right bank of the river Musi, 
which flows between it and the Residency, and is fordable except when swollen by the 
rains. It is about a mile distant from the Residency, and five miles by the road from the 
cantonment of Secundrabad. The population of the city and suburbs has been estima- 
ted at ab6ut 400,000. 

The revenue of this state is about £ 4,000,000 per annum, and the Nizam's forces 
number 720 guns and about 30,000 men, of whom upwards of 6,000 are Arabs, and 
there are altogether about 10,000 foreign mercenaries besides in his territory. The only 
feudatory of the Nizam is the Raja of Gudwal, who is not interfered with so long as he 
pays R9. 1,15,000 a year mto the Nizam's treasury. 

The climate of Hyderabad is on the whole pleasant and healthy during a greater part 
of the year, the tempaature is moderate, and is described as a delightful medium between 
the extremes of heat and cold experienced in the northern parts of India. In the cold 
season the thermometer stands at 74* rising to 91^ in the hot months, of which April and 
May are the most trying. The average rainfall is very small, not exceeding 32 inches for 
the whole coimtry. 



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98 Berar, or The Hyderabad Assigned District8,--CaHimued. 

The Railway from Madras to Bombay runs through a portion of this state, a branch 
called the Nizam's State Railway, 121 miles in length, striking off from Wadi station, 
to Hyderabad the capital, while the Great Indian Peninsula Railway from Bombay to 
Nagpur, traverses the whole length of Berar, from west to east 

The Government of the native state of Hyderabad, or the Nizam's Dominions, is 
modelled after that of Madras. Each district or Ssrcar has its first, second, and third 
Talukdar^ corresponding to Collector, Sub-Collector and Assistant Collector. Three 
districts united, form a division under a Suddar Talukdar or Head Collector. The 
rural chiefe who are distributed throughout the interior of the country under the names 
of Deshmukhs^ Despandias^ Zamindars and Mannewars^ are associated in divers forms 
and degrees with the Revenue and Police administrations of their native districts. 





Sircars or Districts 


in Hyderabad Native State, (Nizanis Dominions). 


No. 


Name and 
Capital. 


Latitude 

N. 


Longitude 


No. 


Name and 
Capital. 


Latitude 

N. 


longitude 




to nearest minute. 




to nearest minute. 


I 


Amrabad 


i6' 


«3' 


78- S7i 


20 


Maikar 


20 10 


76 40 


2 


Baithalwadi ... 


20 


34 


75 41 


21 


Meddak 


17 41 


78 18 


3 


Beda 


17 


57 


77 39 


22 


Mudgal 


16 I 


76 30 


4 


Bhir 


19 





75 49 


23 


Malkhaid 


17 II 


77 12 


s 


Bhonaghir 


17 


30 


78 56 


24 


Mallangur 


18 18 


79 23 


6 


Daolatabad ... 


19 


57 


75 15 


25 


Nander 


19 9 


77 23 


7 


Darur 


18 


50 


76 10 


29 


Nelgonda 


17 3 


79 20 


8 


Daverkonda ... 


16 


4a 


78 58 


27 


Naldrug 


17 49 


76 20 


9 


Elgundel 


18 


36 


79 5 


28 


Panfful 


16 15 


78 9 


10 


Ghunapura ... 


16 


34 


78 5 


29 


Patri 


19 16 


76 30 


II 


Godavari 


... 






30 


Purainda 


18 16 


75 30 


12 


Golkondah ... 


17 


»3 


78 27 


3Jt 


Paiton 


19 29 


75 26 


13 


Jalnah 


19 


SI 


75 56 


32 


Raichor 


16 12 


77 24 


14 


Koilkonda 


16 


45 


77 50 


33 


Ramgir 


18 38 


79 39 


15 


Kulbarga 


17 


19 


76 54 


34 


Shahabad 


17 10 


78 II 


16 


Kaulas 


18 


30 


77 44 


35 


Suggur 


16 37 


76 51 


17 


KaUani 


17 


5a 


76 59 


36 


Warangal 


17 58 


79 40 


18 


Kammammet . . . 


ir 


15 


80 II 


37 


Yedageri 


16 46 


77 " 


19 


Mahor 


19 


50 


76 











Military Stations of the Hyderabad Contingent^ and Subsidiary Force^ under the orders of 
the Resident^ Hyderabad^ (Nizam's Dominions) and Chief Commissioner^ Berar. 



Stations. 



Lat. N. Long. E. 



to nearest nunute. 



Stations. 



Lat. N. Long. E. 



to nearest mtnate. 



I 



Anrangabad, (Hd. (^) 

Bolarum 

ElUchpor 

HingoU 



X9' 53' 

17 3a 

as x8 

X9 43 

x8 44 



75 «x 
70 34 
77 33 
77 IX 

76 as 



feet. 
1,885 

«i377 
Xi495 



Ltngtngur 
Jalna .. 

Akola 

Amraoti 

Hyderabad Residency. 



Sectinderabad, (Jtd, Qrs, SuHidUry Forct^ Populadon 53,438. 



19 51 

ax 6 

ao 56 

17 a3 

X7 a7 



T^ 34' 

75 SO 

77 6 

77 49 

78 3X 

78 33 



x,65a 
9^ 
x,aoa 
«.977 
«f79« 



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II. 

The Bengal Presidency. 



8. 

THE RAJPUTANA AGENCY, 



FOR THB 



NATIVE STATES IN RAJPUTANA, 

Under a Goveraor-General's Agent, 



WITH THE. 



BRITISH DISTRICT OF AJMERE-MERWARA, 



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The Rajputana Agency^ 



lOl 



1877-78. 

British District 



Area 

and 

Population. 



Chirp Towns. 



Lat. N. Lon. E, 



to the nearest 
xninate. 



AJMERE-MERWARA. 

Classificaiien of Population. 

Hindns .. 348,348 = 87*8 

Mahomedans 47,310=11*9 

715= 0-2 

58= O'l 



Christiaos 
Others 



Per square mile . . 146'a 

Land Revenue, Re. 3,89,699 

NcofVaia^es 698 

Average Rainfall in Inches. 35 



Art a, 

Sq. Ms. 

Ajmere 2,070 
Merwara 641 



a,7ti 

Population. 

Ajmere 309.9M 
erwara 86,417 



Ai: 



3961331 



Ajmere 

Nusseenbad (Cantonment) 

Kekri 

Pisangan 

Nyanagar or Beawar 

Pohkar 

Masuda 

Bhinae 

Sawar 

Deoli (Cantonment) . . 

Taragarh Fort .. 

Todgarh . . 

Dawer 



31.583 
17,726 
4,885 
4,352 
12,300 

3,385 
3*844 
4,0'i2 
2,9 



26* 97' 

26 18 

26 z 

26 34 

36 6 

26 39 

26 5 

26 3 

25 49 

25 46 

26 27 
25 43 
25 a6 



74 42 

74 46 

75 20 
74 25 
74 21 
74 36 
74 32 

74 50 

75 2X 
75 25 
74 40 
74 2 
73 51 



Feet 
I, 6m 
1,401 

1,391 
».495 
3,389 
1,450 

1,123 
1,133 
2,855 
2,850 



The district of Ajmere-Merwara lies in the centre of Rigputana, sorrounded on all sides by the territ<Mies of native chiefs, 
and consists geographically of two distinct tracts, which were up till recently two separate districts. The Ajmere portion lies 
between 35' 41' and 36° 41' North Latitude, and 74° 17' and 75° 37' East Longitude. The tract called Merwara^ from the pecu- 
liar race of Mers who inhabit it, is a narrow strip of hill country about 100 miles in length and $ to 30 miles broad, lying be- 
tween 35* 33* and 36* If' North Latitude, and 73* 47' and 74° 30' East Longitude. The population in the open country of Ajmere 
is mainly agricultural, the prevailing classes being Jats, Rajputs and Gujars, numbering 30,486, 14,558 and 39,345 respectively. 

The plateau on which stands the town of Ajmere, one of the most picturesque in India, is perhaps the highest elevation of 
the plains of Hindustan, and the fort of Taragarh, which overlooks the town, is more than 1,300 feet above the plateau. The 
town lies surrounded by low hills on the edge of a great artificial lake, and contains the tomb of a renowned Mussalman saint. 
The controlling authority in the united districts b vested in a Commissioner assisted by two Assistant Commissioners, the 
Commissioner being also Agent to the Governor General for the States of Rajputana. 



Miliiary Stations of the Rajputana Force ^ under the orders of the Governor-GeneraPs 

Agent for Rajputana. 





Stations. 


1 


Lat N. 


Lon. E. 


£ 


Na 


Stations. 


1 


Lat. N. 


Lon. E. 




No. 


to the nearest 
minute. 


to the nearest 
minute. 


I 
9 
3 


Mount Abu (Hd. Qrs.) 

DcoIi 

Erinpara 
Kherwara 


In. 
68 
39 

13 


24' 36' 
25 46 
25 9 
24 4 


72- 45' 
75 25 
73 6 
73 40 


f-eet. 

3.930 

1,132 

869 
X,300 


1 

I 


Ajmere 

Ulwur 

Sambhar 

Beawar 


In. 
25 


«6* 3/ 
27 34 


74* 42' 
76 38 
75 14 
74 21 


Feet. 

1,632 
9x8 

1.495 



Military Stations of the Mhow Division^ garrisoned by the Bombay Army, 



Mhow (Head Quarters) 

Nusseerabad . . 

Taragarh 

Neemuch 

Asirgarh 



22 34 

26 18 

a6 37 

34 28 

2X a8 



74 40 
74 54 



«,9i9 
1,461 

2,855 
t,6i6 
2,198 



Mehidpur 
Malhargarh 
Indore . . 
Agar 



«3 29' 

24 17 

33 41 

23 44 



75 42' 

75 2 

75 55 

76 4 



i,6oa 
1,580 
1,785 
i,<57S 



Military Stations of the Central India Force, under the orders of the Governor-General s 

Agent for Central India, 



Indore (Head Quarters) 

Goona .. 

Agar 



32 41 

24 39 
23 44 



75" 55' 

77 33 
76 4 



1,785 
1^617 
1.675 



Sirdarpore. 
Sehore .. 



22- 3/ 

33 X2 



75' 4' 
77 7 



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102 



The Rajputana Agency, — Continued. 



List of the Native States and Chief ships embraced in the eight Political Agencies known as 
the Rajputana Agency , under control of the Commissioner and Governor-Generars Agent for 

the States of Rajputana, 



Political Agbncibs 
AND States. 



Meywar Agency. 

Oodeypore or Meywar . . 
AveraKe Rainfall 23" 
Popln. of Capl.zoo^ooo. 

Banswara 

Dongarpur 

Partabgarh 



Estimated 



Area. 



Sq.M 
13.674 



1,332 

95» 
1,215 



Popln. 



1,161,400 



100,000 
150,000 



Revenue. 



Rs. 

64,00,000 



150,000 3,00,000 



03.350 

3,6o,ooo 



Position 

of 
Chief. 



Tribute, 



Maharana 



Maharawal 
do. 
do. 



Rs. 



27,380 
27,380 
72,700 



Forces. 



363 



6,240 



60 



13,900 



of State Capital. 



Other Parganas under control of this Agency. 

NiMBAHBRA of TodIc, and Jawad-Nimach of Gwalior. 

Minor Chiefs of Oodeypore. 



N. 



n* 35' 



i»3 30 
I23 50 
24 2 



Long. 



Ft. 
73' 43' 1,950 



74 34 

73 50 

74 49 tA» 






I 



Kotra 

Gagunda 

Panarwa 



Oghna 

Jura 

CI 



'hamund 



Salurobar I Korabar I Madria tRev. 3,500! 

Mugra Kherwara Para (Rev. 7,000) Channi (Rev. 1,600] 

Juwas (Rev. 16,000) | Jharol I Thanna (Rev. z,3ooj 

These C^efis bear the general title of Rao, they are mostly known as the Bhumia Bhil Thakurs. 

Thakurates of Banswara. 

Kusalgarh Molan Garhi Khandn Kusalpura Takarra Talwara 

Arthuna Metwala Ganora Surpur Bankora Mandwa Aorwara 



Tambcvm 



Thakurates of Dongarpur. 





Bankora Pit 
Chitri Thakorda 


Madon 
Bumasa 


Bachiwara Nandl 
Todawal SabU 


I 


Kua 
Ramgarh 




Si3i 


\ 


I 

2 

3 

» 
S 

I 


Jeypore Agency. 

Average Rainfall 35" 
Popln. of capital 137,887 

Kishengarh 

Lawa 

Lhetri, Raja. Revenue 450,0 
ikar, „ „ 400,0 
Jniara, „ „ 175,0 


14,883 

00 Rs. 

00 „ 
00 „ 


1,900,000 
105,000 

M 

Patau, 
Baswa 

Nawal 


47.31.650 

13,00,000 
4,500 

Unor C> 
R«ua 

Wh. ;: 


Maharaja 

do. 
Thakur 

hiefs of ^ 

. Revenue 

»» 


4,00,000 

feypore 

70,000 F 
70,000 , 


398 
36 

s. 


3,530 
550 

Manda 
Surajg 
Seven 


14,600 
3.500 

war, R 

arh, 
Kotris, 


»6'55' 75' 5«' 1.58a 1 

26 33 74 57 1,53a 
a6 33 ,75 43 1,099 

aja. Revenue. 50,000 Rs. 
„ „ 50,000 „ 
Thakurs. 


I 


Shujangarh Agency, 

Bickaneer 

Average Rainfall 
North 8" South 30" 


22,340 


350,000 


10,58,000 


Maharaja 


•• 


95 


750 


1300 


28' r' 


73* as' 


793 


1 


z 

3 


Marwat Agency. 

Jodhpore or Marwar 

with Godwarand Mallani 
Jeysulmere 

Average Rainfall 5" 

Ahor Bagri 
Alaniawas Balunda 
Asop Bhakri 
Awa Badsa 

Bikampur (Rao). Bar 


37.000 
16,447 

1 

OX 
CI 
Gl 
G 

u. Gyj 


3,000,000 
75,000 

^hakurc 

lanand 
landawal 
laneza 
ora 

Th 

un. Jingi 


35,00,000 

z, 00,00c 

ites of J 

Hanua] 
Jaula 
Khejurl 
Kherwa 

akurate 

wali. Sir< 


Maharaja 
Maharwal 

^odhpore 

la K)i 
Ku 

a Ma 
Mi 

s of/ey^ 

la. Barsal 


98,000 

with I 

invasar 
chaman 
iroth 
thri 

mlmere 

pur (Rao] 


370 

13 

N 
Pc 
Ri 
R( 

\. Di 


3,545 
500 

^ani. 

unbaj 
kharan 
lepur 
>hat 

uigri. 


5,000 
400 

T 

E 
L 
J 

Gir^jsi 


26*18' 
a6 55 

kxliana 
^hiana 
asd 

n. Rin 


73' 4' 
70 57 

tdur. 1 


i,a74 
959 

Bannc 
Sindai 
Nagai 
Rayan 

Bap. 


1 

1 

ST 

i . 


I 
3 

3 


EastemStatesAgency 

Bhurtpore .. ^^ ^ .. 
Average Rawfall 3a* 

Dholpore* 

Kerowlie 


1,834 
1,360 


743*710 

338,000 
140,000 


33,30,000 

10,37,000 
4,50,000 


Mahan^'a 

Rana 
Maharaja 


•• 


38 

3a 
40 


3,000 

600 
400 


8,500 

3,650 
3,300 


27* z?' 

364a 
26 30 


77* 3a' 

n 53 
n 4 


735 

570 
z,zoo 


1 



* Under British management. 



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The Rajputana Agency, — Continued. 



103 



Political Agencies 
AND States. 



Estimated. 



Area. 



Popln. 



Revenue, 



Poddon 

of 
Chief. 



Tribute. 



Forces. 



I 



of Sute Capital. 



Lat. 

N. 



Long. 
E. 



^1 



Haraoti and Tonk 
Agency, 

Boondee 

Kotah* 

\ Jhallawar * . . 
I Cafntal Jhaira Patan. 
Average Rainfall 40^. 
^| Tonk . . . . • . . 
SJ Shahpura 

r Under British management ',1 



Sq.Ms 



1.917 
4,484 



224,000 
527,000 



2,1461326,000 



1, 8oO| 320,000 
400I 36,000 



Rs. 

8,00,000 
28,00,000 
i7»74.ooo 

xo,8oyOOo 
2,28,000 



Maharao Raja. 

Rana. 
Maharaj Rana. 



Nawab. 
Raja. 



Rs. 



i,ao,ooo 
1,84,720 

8o,coo 



15,844 



700 
700 
4*5 



1,130 
250 



«»375 
4,600 
4.400 



1.730 
250 



25' 87' 

25 zo 

24 32 

26 XI 

25 38 



75 41 

75 52 

76 13 



75 50 
74 58 



Ft. 

1,426 

920 

1,242 

1,462 



Other Farganas under control of this Agency 

Phulia Pargana, (British).— Aligarh, Chapra, and Rampura of Tonk.— Kach aula of Meywar or Oodeypore, 
^ the MiNA Kherar of Shapura. 



and 



Ulwur Agency, 

Ulwur 



3.380 778,600 



23,50,000 Maharao Raja. 



Minor Chief 0/ Ulwur, Nimrana (Thakur). 



300 



^'34 



76' 38' 



t.960 



Sirohee Agency, 



Sirohee 



2»057 



Raa 



375 



24 53 



Other Chief Towns of Rajputana, 



Banswara. 

Kalinjra 

Bickan*er. 

Anuj^arh 

Bidesar 

Bhatner 

Bahadran 

Chora 

Nohar 

Raj^rh 

Reni 

Ratangarh 

Sujangarh 

BooHtUe, 

Indargarh 

Dublana 

Nainwah 

Dongar^r. 

Galliakot 
Sagwara 



Jeyport, 

Amber 

Bissao 

Chatsn 

Dausa 

Fatehpur 

Jhunjhnu 

Xhandela 

Kot Pudi 

Lachmangarh 

Ramgarh 

Ruf^arh 

Sambhar 

Samod 

Sanganer 

Hindon 

Singhana 

Kotak, 
Barod 
Nahargarb 
Rajgarh 
Sangod 
Sultanpur 



Jodkpore. 

Didwana 

Mirta 

Mundor 

Nadol 

Pali 

Pipar 

PhaUodi 

Tonk. 

Nimbahera 

Rampura 

Nagsir 

Ulwur. 

Lachmangarh 

Macheri 

Rajgarh 

Ramgarh 

Tijara 

Partabgark. 
Dcolia 



Oodtyport. 
Amli 
Banera 
Bednor 
Bhindah 
Chitor 
Dabkh 
Deogarh 
Gnsar 
Gangapura 
Jahazpur 
Nathawara 
RaipuT 
Rajgarh 
Rajnagar 
Rashmu 
Rohera 
Sanganer 
Sawa 

Dholpore. 
Ban 
Mainesa 
Nagar 
Rajakhera 



Jhaira Paiati, 

Asnawar 

Awar 

Bukari 

Burod 

Chechat 

Dag 

Gangrar 

Kailwara 

Kherabad 

Kotra Bhatta 

Jawar 

Delanpur 

Gagraun 

Ratadei 

Shahabad 

Pachpahar 

Suket 

Richhwa 

Sarera 

KeroiolU. 
Mandrel 
Machilpur 



Notes on the above States^ 

Of the above twenty Nadve States of the Rajputana Agency, all except Shahpura and Lawa, befong to the first rank in 
the empire, being under treaty widi the Imperial Government. Fifteen of them are still ruled by the chiefs of Riyput dans or 
families. Bhurtpore and Dholpur belong to Jat families, and Tonk to a Mahomedan dynasty. Shahpura, which has no treaty 
with the empire, diflfers from the others both as to its origin as well as to the nature of its polidcal connections. The ancestor 
of this state received a grant of lands belonging to Meywar. Those lands one of the succeeding Shahpura chiefs united 
with a grant of 84 villages made to him by the emperor Shah Jehan, in the imperial district of Ajmere ; the whole tnct now 
consdtutes the Shahpura state, whose chief thus holds grants both from Oodeypore and the Empire. The small chief-ship of 
Khetri is held on a double tenure of the same kind as that of Shahpura. On the eastern border of Rajputana beyond the 
states of Boondee and Kotah, are seven esutes called the seven Kotris, held by seven Rjyput families paying tribute to Jeyp<»«- 
through Kotah, which state is generally responsible for them to the Imperial Government. The minor dhiefships of each state 
pay tribute to the state's chief, and are subject to his general authority. On the western border of Ra^utana is a peculiar tract 
called MaUani^ within the territory of the Jodhpore chief, which has always claimed a sort of independence, and in whicb 
there are no very great land-holders, the whole country being parcelled out among family groups. The Shaihhamati tract in 
the northern districts of the Jeypore state, is in a similar condidon of debateable submission to the Jeypore chief. The 
polidcal condition of the Hill Tracts belonging to Meywar is rather complicated. These tracts are inhabited by Bhil tribes, 
some of whom are direcdy under the State's Government, others are under the immediate jurisdicdon of the great Rajput 
nobles whose lands they inhabit, while a third secdon is under its own chiefs, who, though paying tribute to Oodeyporej are yet 
very independent within their own domains. These Bhil tracts stretch from Sirohee to Dungarpur. 



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I04 The Rajputana Agency,— Continued. 

BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

Area^ Position, Boundaries^ &c. 

Rajputana, so denominated from its prevailing population, the Rajputs, is a great 
territorial circle including the British district of Ajmere-Merwara and nineteen states, 
each having its own autonomy and separate chief. This territory lies between the paral- 
lels of 23' and 30° North Latitude, and 69' 30' and 78** 15' East Longitude. The total 
area is approximately estimated at 129,091, square miles. On the west Rajputana is 
bounded by the province of Sind in the Bombay Presidency, and on the north-west by 
the native state of Bahawalpur under the Punjab Government ; thence all its northern 
and eastern frontier marches with the Punjab and the North-Westem Provinces ; on the 
south-east it is bounded by the territories of Sindhia, Holkar and other native states of 
the Central India Agency ; and on the south-west its frontier marches with the Gujarat 
native states of the Bombay Presidency. Within this area, the states of Jeysulmere, Jodh- 
pore or Marwar and Bickaneer lie in the west and north ; Ulwur and the Shekhawati tract 
of Jeypore in the north-east ; Jeypore, Bhurtpore, Dholpur, Kerowlee, Boondee, Kotah 
and Jhallawar are the eastern and south-eastern states ; Sirohee lies in the south-west, 
while Partabgarh, Banswara, Dungarpur, and Oodeypore or Meywar lie in the south. In 
the centre lie the British district of Ajmere-Merwara, the states of Kishengarh and Shah- 
pura and parts of Tonk. 

Topography. 

Rajputana is divided into two main divisions by the Aravalli range of hills which 
runs through it in a direction nearly north-east and south-west, about three-fifths of the 
territory lying north-west of this line, and two-fifths on the south-east In order to make 
a general description of this great region intelligible, these divisions will be dealt with 
separately. 

The North- West Division comprises the whole vast tract stretching from Sind on the 
west, and along the southern Punjab frontier, to near Delhi on the north-east The 
character of this tract which radiates with a constant though very slight slope towards 
the Rann of Cutch and the Indus, is throughout uniformly sandy, unproductive and ill 
watered, though improving gradually from a mere desert in the west and north-west, to 
comparatively habitable and fertile lands towards the north-east and north. Immediately 
beyond the mountain's skirt, the soil alters from hard rock to sand mixed with very little 
loam, and the country, as far as the beginning of the desert proper, or up to the Loni 
river, consists of a succession of gentle swells clothed with rather thick, low jungle, &irly 
peopled and to some extent cultivated. Beyond the Loni river, and from the edges of 
the Rann of Cutch, stretches north-eastward through the states of Mallani, Jeysulmere, 
Jodhpore, and Bickaneer, the Great Desert of northern India known as the Tharr^ a vast 
sandy plain, traversed in the interior by long waves of sand hills. The character of this 
desert region is the same everywhere, consisting of long straight ridges of sand hills run- 
ning in parallel lines, separated by short and fairly regular intervals, and varying from 50 
to 100 feet in height, sparsely clothed with stunted shrubs and tufts of coarse grass, with 
wells few and deep, rendering agricultiure difficult, and towns and villages at long dis- 
tances apart In the north-eastern angle of Rajputana, the country is not so near a 
wilderness as in the extreme north and west, yet a great extent is comparatively waterless 
and waste. Some few parts, however, have a better soil, and in these the principal towns 
are well-built and fairly prosperous. The sub-montane region, lying immediately under 



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The Rajputana Agency, — Continued. 105 

the northern slopes of the Aravallis, varying in height from 600 to 2,000 feet, and absorb- 
ing the drainage up to the Loni river, is well cultivated, especially along the banks of 
the Loni, and has many substantial villages. The general level of the country in the north- 
west division is much lower than the country on the south-eastern side of the Aravallis, 

The second great Division of Rajputana, south-east of the Aravallis, contains the 
higher and more fertile country. In contrast to the sandy plains, which are the uniform 
feature more or less modified of the north-west, this south-eastern division has a more 
diversified character and kindlier soil It contains extensive hill ranges, and long stretches 
of rocky woodland, traversed by considerable rivers with wide vales, fertile table-lands 
and great breadths of excellent soil. The Meywar country occupies all the eastern 
flank of the range, at a level eight or nine hundred feet higher than the plains of the west, 
and whereas the western slopes of the Aravallis, towards the Jodhpore country, is 
abrupt on the eastern, on the Meywar, Kishengarh and Jeypore side, the land falls very 
gradually as it recedes from the long parallel ridges, spreading out into the open 
champaign country of the centre of Meywar, though on the south-west corner of this tract 
the outskirts of the main range become entangled in a confused net-work of outlying 
hills and valleys, covered with forest, and known as the Meywar Hill Tracts. From 
November to June this portion is easily traversed, but during and after the rainy season, 
many swamps form, and the river beds are often an impassable flood. All the south-east 
of Rajputana is watered by the drainage of the Vindhyas. In the extreme south-east 
corner, there is a long narrow strip of country called the Chaumela^ and on the eastern 
side a remarkable plateau called the Patar^ upon which lies almost all the territory of 
Kotah, with parts of Boondee to the north of Kotah, and of Jhallawar to the south of it 
From the south this table-land is ascended by three distinct steppes or elevations out of 
the Malwa plain, and the line of hills which marks its eastern edge runs round by Chit- 
tore to Mandalgarh. The north-western face of this plateau is very distinctly marked by 
the line of the Boondee hills, which run like a wall from Mandalgarh north-west to Indar- 
garh. Eastwards this plateau falls towards the Gwalior country, so gradually that the 
general aspect would not suggest a raised plateau, though the three low steppes leading 
up to it from the south and west, are very distinctly marked. The surface of this plateau 
is more or less stony with wide uplands, broad dips or levels, containing deep black 
culturable soil between the hills, the summits of which are rugged, irregular, barren or 
covered with vegetation. Between the Chambal and Parbati rivers there is a considerable 
tract of rich, black soil. Beyond the Patar to the north-east of the junction of the 
Banas and Chambal rivers, there is a very rugged region, consisting of several ranges of 
no great height, running parallel with the river's course, and separating the Chambal basin 
from the uplands. Further northward the country smooths down and opens out towards 
the Bhurtpore territory. In the north-east corner of the Oodeypore state, about the town of 
Jihazpur, and within the Boondee territory adjoining, is a rugged bit of country called the 
Mina Kherar, Further southward again in the south-east comer of the same state, is 
another stretch of hill country and jungle enclosed by the towns of Oodeypore, Dungar- 
pur, Partabgarh and Neemuch, called the Chappan, one of the most difficult and trouble- 
some in Central India. The Bhakar is another tract of very rugged hill country lying 
over against Abu, to the east of the Sirohi state,- inhabited by Grassias, a half-blood tribe 
between Bhils and Rajputs. 

Of the mountains and hill ranges, the Aravallis are by far the most important, they 
mark off the whole of Rajputana into two natural divisions, separating the desert plains of 
the north-west from the more fertile and kindlier region of the south-cast. From the 



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io6 The Rajputana Agency, — Continued. 

north-east, the first appearance of this range on a large scale is near the town of Khetii, 
where it attains an altitude of 2,600 feet, increasing to 3,450 feet at Ragonathgarh, its 
highest elevation in this direction, Harasnath in the Sikar district being 2,998 feet At 
Ajmere the range begins to widen out considerably, the highest points ranging from 1,000 
to 2,000 feet above the plain, the most conspicuous peak being that on which stands the 
fort of Taragarh, overlooking Ajmere, 2,855 feet above sea level From Ajmere to 
Beawar the range is less imposing. From near Beawar south-west, for about 100 miles in 
the Merwara strip of hill country in the range, the peaks rise to about 2,850 feet, the 
average level of the valleys being about 1,800 feet Beyond Merwara the hills widen, 
with peaks rising to about 4,000 feet above sea level, the culminating point rising above 
the village of Jargo, to the height of 4,330 feet There is great difl&culty of communica- 
tion across this section of the Aravallis between Mejrwar and Marwar, and the only pass 
really practicable for wheels and general traffic is that of Dasuri Further south, the hills 
decrease in height, and spread out until the chain loses its distinctive formation amid 
wide tracts of hilly wastes, extending southward over the whole western half of Meywar. 
Mount Abu belongs by position to the Aravalli range ; it is a cluster of hills of whidi the 
highest peak rises to 5,653 feet The other hill ranges of Rajputana are comparatively 
insignificant, they run through Bhurtpore, Boondee and Kerowlie ; their greatest height no- 
where exceeds 1,400 feet The Makandarra range runs across the south-west districts of 
the Kotah state, from the Chambal to beyond Jhalrapatan. 

Of rivers, the Chambal is by far the largest in Rajputana, flowing through the pro- 
vince for about one-third of its course, and forming its boundary for another third. It 
rises in the summits of the Vindhyas, upwards of 2,000 feet above the sea, and is about 
650 miles in length. Next in importance to the Chambal is the Banas, which rises in the 
south-west of Meywar, collecting in its course all the drainage of that tract, and joining 
the Chambal a little beyond the north-east extremity of the Boondee state, after a course, 
of about 300 miles. In the north-west division, the only river of any consequence is the 
Loni, rising in the Pohkhar valley near Ajmere, and after a course of 200 miles flowing 
into the Rann of Cutch ; its waters are brackish, hence its name, meaning the salt river. 
North-west of the Loni, and throughout all the north-east, Rajputana is entirely destitute 
of streams worth mention. The minor rivers are the Sabarmati^ the Mahi^ the Som^ the 
Bamnt\ the Parbati^ the Beraich^ the Kotesar and the DhuncL The Banas abounds in 
dangerous quicksands. 

There are no natural fresh water lakes in Rajputana ; the only considerable basin is 
the well-known salt lake at Sambhar. There are, however, large artificial lakes within 
Meywar, built with the object of storing water, wk, the Debar, Kankraoli, Udisagar and 
Pichola lakes. 

The following lines of Railway run through the Province, m., the * Rajputana State 
Railway* from Palanpiu: to Ajmere, Jeypore and Agra, a branch line to Delhi diverging 
from Bandikui station. This line is open for traffic from Agra to Ajmere, as also is the 
branch to Delhi ; from Ajmere to Palanpur it is under construction. The * Ajmere and 
Neemuch State Railway,* also under construction \ the * Holkar State Railway,' from 
Khandwa station on the Great Indian Peninsular line to Neemuch, with a branch to 
Ujjain, open for traffic ; and the 'Sindhia State Railway' from Agra to Gwalior vi& Dholpur, 
open for traffic up to the last named place. 

Climate. 

The climate of Rajputana as a whole may be reckoned as one of the healthiest in 
India, at least for its natives. The moderate rainfall, the free play of the winds over its 



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The Rajputana Agency, — Continued. 107 

surface, the sparse population, the absence of great cities and the plentiful supply of salt, 
may be some of the reasons why the inhabitants live long and thrive well. In the sum- 
mer the sun's heat is much the same all over the province, and except in the high hills is 
great everywhere, in the north-west very great Hot winds and dust storms are known 
more or less throughout. In the winter the climate of the north is much colder than in 
the lower districts, with hard frost and ice on the Bickaneer border, and from the great 
dryness of the atmosphere, the change of temperature between day and night is sudden, 
excessive and very trying sometimes. The rainfall is very unequally distributed through- 
out Rajputana. In the north-western part, />., in Jeysulmere, Bickaneer and the greater 
part of Jodhpore, the fall scarcely averages more than five inches. Dew is here for the great 
part of the year the substitute for rain. In the south-west the fall is much more copious, 
and in the south-east it is most abundant In the south-west highlands of the Aravallis it 
sometimes passes loo inches. In Meywar the country is never subjected to the extreme 
droughts of the north-west and west In the central district of Ajmere and towards 
Jeypore, the periodical supply of rain is very variable ; in fact to sum up, from the north- 
west to the south-east (excluding the Aravallis) there is a very gradually increasing rainfall 
from five to about forty-five inches. Mount Abu is the sanatarium of Rajputana. 

Staples and Manufactures, 

The mass of the people is occupied in agriculture. In the large towns banking and 
commerce floiuish to a degree beyond what would have been expected from so backward 
a country. In the north the staple products for export are, salt, grain, wool and some cot- 
ton. In the south the great articles of export are, opium and cotton. In other parts of 
Rajputana various kinds of cereals, pulses and fibres are grown for native consumption. 
Melons grow in profiision in the sandy tracts and supply food to the inhabitants for a 
considerable portion of the year. The main wealth of the desert lands of Marwar and 
Bickaneer, however, consists of the vast herds of camels, horned cattle and sheep, which 
roam over the sandy wastes, and thrive admirably in this dry climate on the nutritious 
grass of the country. From these pastwe lands vast numbers of sheep are driven annual- 
ly to Bombay, and camels and horned cattle are bred in such numbers, that they supply 
the neighboiuing provinces. The Bickaneer camel is considered the largest, swiftest and 
handsomest in India. There are no manufactures on any great scale. Woollen and leather 
goods are manufactured in the northern states, and steel weapons of a superior quality at 
Sirohee. Salt is extensively manufactured in Jodhpore and Jeypore from the great salt lakes 
of Sambhar, Didwana, Pokharan and Phalodi in Jodhpore, and Kachor-Rewassa in Shek- 
hawati, and at the salt works of Pachbadra in Jodhpore. 

Of metallic ores and minerals, cobalt, iron, lead, copper and alum abound in several 
parts of the Aravalli range, and in the minor ridges of Ulwiu:, Shekhawati, Meywar, Kotah 
and Jhallawar. Building and ornamental stone, limestone and slate are found in the 
Boondee and Ulwur hills, in the Aravalli range about Ajmere, and in Jeysulmere ; the 
limestone of the Makrana quarries in Jodhpore, and of Jeysulmere being noted, as well as 
the slabstones from the quarries at Sillora in Kishengarh territory, used for purposes for 
which wood is employed elsewhere in India. 

Census. 

Except in the British district of Ajmere-Merwara, correct statistics of the population 
are not available for the states of Rajputana. Approximate calculations of the number 
of people in each state have been made, mainly upon the basis of counting the villages 
and obtaining a fair average of the number of people inhabiting an ordinary village, the 
figures thus resulting are given opposite each state. 



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l^ 



II. 

The Bengal Presidency. 



THE CENTRAL INDIA AGENCY ; 



FOR THE 



NATIVE STATES IN CENTRAL INDIA. 

Under a Governor-General's Agent 



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The Central India Agency. 



Ill 



List of the Native States and Chief ships embraced in the eight Political Agencies known 

as the " Central India Agency** under control of the Commissioner and 

Governor- Generafs Agent for the States of Central India, 













Estimated. 


Position 
of 






Forces. 


Lat. 

N. 


Long. 
E. 


i 


s^ 


i 


Political Agencies 








Tribute. 




1 


\ 


?l 




AND States. 


Area. 


Popln. 


Revenue. 


Chitt 




i 

9 



1 


Of Capital. 


s 




Gwalior Agency, 


Sq.Ms 




Rs. 




Rs. 












feet. 




1 


GwaUor (Sindhia) 

Population 5o>ooo 

Mi$u>r Chu/s of Gwalior. 


33."9 


a, 500,000 


190,50,000 


Maharaja 


35.000 


48 


6,000 


5,000 


36* la' 


78* la' 


1089 






o Amjhcra 


584 


57,a3a 


a,oo,ooo 


Raja 
Thakur 










aa 32 


7510 




1 




I. Bajrangarh 




















3434 


77 '8 




w 




a. BarodaorSheopor 




^ 








.. 


do. 










3540 


7644 




1 




3. Barra .. 




g 










do. 


















4. Araun .. 




b0 








,, 


do. 








,. 


2423 


7728 








5. Gharra.. 




1 










do. 










3434 


77 37 




1 




6. Bhadaura 




9 








7,000 


do. 








,, 


3448 


77 36 






7. Dhamaoda 




c« 










do. 










24 36 


77 8 






8. Khalthaun 












4,000 


do. 




















9. Narwar 




§ 










do. 








.. 


2539 


7756 








lo. Paron .. 













1,000 


do. 










34 59 


76 S8 








XI. Miana .. 




t; 










do. 










34 51 


77 3» 








I a. Ragogarh 




"^ 








4*8,000 


do. 










2427 


7714 
7718 








13. Sirsi 




r:^ 








4,000 


do. 








., 


25 a 








14. Umn .. 


J ' 








•• 


do. 










2445 


7721 








Othtr Parganas urn 


derconiro 


lo/Gwalh 


>r Agency. 




















Chhabra, Pargana of Tonic State, a 


nd Shaha 


BAD, Parga 


inaofjhallaw 


ar State. 


















Bhopal Agency, 




























Bhopal 


8,aoo 


769,000 


13.76.250 


Bcgam 




57 


694 


a,aoo 


33 16 


7736 


165a 




a 


Rajgarh 


64a 


75.740 


3,50,000 


Nawab 






13 


340 


^60 


34 


7647 






3 Nareinghgarh 


730 


87,000 


4,00,000 


da 






9 


98 


336 


2344 


77 8 






4 Khilchipur 


ao4 


16,800 


1,75,000 


do. 








60 


300 


34 2 


7637 




1 


5 Karwai 


T6a 


1,00,000 


do. 








40 


150 


24 7 


78 s 


1387 


5 


6 Mak&udaogarh or Naiakila 


81 


9,700 


31.000 


do. 












24 4 


77 18 




OQ 


T Muhammadgarh 


80 


a,94o 


7,000 


do. 










. , 


2339 


78 n 






8 Pathari 


aa 


4.330 


ia,ooo 


da 












3356 


78 15 






9, Basoda 


68 


5,440 


zo,ooo 


da 






3 


la 


60 


2337 


78 14 






lO 


Lara wad 


30 


a,9oo 


7,000 


Raja 






















Guaranteed Tkakuraies, 






































Oih^ Parganas under control 0/ Bho^ Agency. 




I. Agra Barkhera 




4,aao 


7.000 


Thakur 


0/ Gwalior (Sindhia,) 0/ Indcrv (Ho/kar.) 




a. Dagria 

3. Darya Kheri 

4. Dhabla Dhir 

5. Dhabla Ghosi 

6. Duleta 




"6 
10 


•?f6 
855 


5 
5 


000 
,000 
500 


da 
da 
do. 
do. 
do 


I. Bhilsa-Cachora. i. Zirapur 
a. Gani Basoda. a. Machalpur. 

3. Malhargarh. 3. Kantaphor, 

4. Shuiawalpur. 4. Gagron, 

5. Sonkach. 5. Nimawar, 

0. Sundarsi (Share.) 6. Sundarsi (Share,) 




7. Hirapur 

8. Jabria Bhil 






644 
909 


6 


.500 


da 
da 




9. Ihalera 
10. Kamalpur 






'716 






do. 
do. 


Of Tonk, I. Sironj. 0/ Dewas. i. Sarangpur. 




11. Kakar Khcri 
la. Khajuri 

13. Kharsia 

14. Piplia Nagar 












da 


Muhxunmadgarh was originally part of Karwai. 






ik 


853 
700 


• 




do. 
do. 
do. 


Basoda and Maksudangarh are feudatories of Sin- 






10 






dhia, but under the Political Agent for Bhopal. 




15. Ramgarh .. 






320 






da 


Larawad will lapse to Dhar and Dewas on the death 


't6. Sutalia 






4.45^ 






da 


of the present chief; the estate is now under 




ii7. Tappa 




1,269 




da 


British management. 



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Google 



112 The Central India Agency, — Continued. 
















ESTIMATBD. 


Portion 




FORCBS. 


LaL 


Loot 


1 


ii? 


















. 1 


N 


E 




i 


AND States. 


Area. 


Popln. 


Revenue. 


of 
ChieC 


Tribute. 


I 




1 


S 


o-S 




ofCapitaL 


Jl 




Bundelkhand Agency, 


SqMs. 




Rs. 




Rs. 












feet. 




1 


OrchhaorTehri 


a,z6o 


zo5,ooo 


9,00,000 


Maharaja 


,, 


90 


aoo 


4.400 


as'az' 


78-4I' 


.. 




a 


Datia 


850 


5,00,000 


do. 


.. 


97 


700 


3/>oo 


as 40 


7830 


• • 




3 


Samthar (Umrah) 


175 


50,000 
z83/)oo 


4,00,000 


Raja 


,, 


35 


300 


a,ooo 


9550 


7948 


.. 




4 


Panna 


9.555 


5,00,000 


Maharaja 


«:lil 


'9 


as© 


9.440 


9444 


»«47 




1 
I 


Charkhari 


V^ 


zazyooo 


5,00,000 


do. 


31 


aao 


9,090 


9594 






Ajaigarh 
Bijawar 


8oa 
9ao 


53.000 
zoa,ooo 


a,a5,ooo 
9.a5,ooo 


do. 
Raja 


7.0Z3 


z6 

4 


Z50 
zoo 


1^ 


^1? 


80 13 
7932 


X474 






z»a4o 


Z7o,ooo 


9,50.000 


do. 


.. 


39 


6a 


1,178 


T\ 


7938 


• • 




9 


Baom 


za9 


ao,ooo 


z,oo,ooo 


Nawab 




3 


40 


575 


79 5 


• • 




lO 


Alipura 
Behri 


8S 


z5,ooo 


3o,aoo 


Jaghirdar 


,, 


a 




z8o 


35 zo 


7993 


.. 




ZI 


30 


6,000 


azyooo 


do. 


.. 




95 


Z35 


9555 


zt 


• • 




za 


Bhaisaundat .. 


za 


6,000 


z 1,000 


do. 


,, 




.. 


80 


25 Z7 






Z3 


Bihat 


X5 


5,000 


0,000 


do. 


z,400 






X95 


2595 


7994 


• • 




Z4 


Bijna* .. , •• 


97 


3,000 


do. 


,. 


a 


15 


Z25 


2597 


79 5 


• • 


i 


Z5 


Bironda or Pathar Kachhar 


a3o 


94.000 


48,000 


do. 


,, 


3 


ao 


Z70 


95 3 


8036 


.. 


il 


Chobe (Kalinjar) 


^ 


14,000 


.. 


do. 


.. 




.. 




3538 


8049 


.. 


■? 


15 


Dhurwahi* 


z8 


4,000 


za,ooo 


do. 


.. 




8 


'930 


79 7 






Garrauli 


95 


5,000 


15,000 


do. 


.. 




.. 


75 


95 5 


7994 


• • 




Z9 


Gaurihar 


V^ 


7,000 


51,000 


do. 


.. 


3 


35 


940 


35 z6 


80 zo 


• • 




90 


Tasoorjasu .. 


z8o 


94.000 


30,000 


do. 


.. 


a 


50 




3430 


80 3a 






ai 


Jigni 


V 


8,000 


Z4,ooo 


do. 


.. 




.. 


57 


9545 


7997 
78 zo 


• • 




aa 


KEaniaDhana 


84 


ao,ooo 


do. 


.. 




.. 


z6o 


35 a 


• • 




83 


Lughasi 
Naigawan Ribai 


% 


5,000 


zo,ooo 


do. 




5 




»35 


95 5 


79 37 


•• 




94 


5.360 


10,370 


do. 


.. 




.. 


^ 


35 10 


£?! 


• • 




35 


Pahrat 


zo 


4,000 


13.000 


do. 


.. 




4 


9593 


•• 




a6 


Pahari Banka* 


4 


a,ooo 


5.000 


do. 


.. 




.. 


50 


35 Z4 


8050 


• • 




% 


Paldeot 


a8 


8,000 


aOfOoo 


da 


.. 




.. 


aso 


35 6 


80 5Z 


• • 




Pathar Kachhar see Bironda 


,. 




., 


do. 


., 




.. 




3546 


8036 






99 


Sarila 


35 


6,000 


30,000 


do. 


.. 


4 


40 


aoo 


79 43 


• • 




30 


Taraon or Tirowan t 


za 


3.000 
6,000 


11,000 


do. 


.. 




.. 


80 


35 Z4 


805a 


• • 




31 


Tori Fatehpur* 


36 


30,000 


do. 


.. 




.. 


,, 


3538 


79 9 


• • 




3a 


Kamta Rajaula 


4 


a,ooo 


3.000 


do. 


•• 




•• 


•• 


35" 


8055 








Baghelkhand Agency, 


























z 


Rewah, Population ia,ooo 
Nagodeor Uchera 


13,000 


9,035,000 


a5,0o,ooo 


Mahanya 


None 


S6 


900 


za,6oo 


9431 


8z Z9 


,, 




a 


450 


7S.OOO 


z, 50,000 


Raja 


„ 


a 




zz6 


9434 
34 z6 


8037 


.. 


1 


3 


Msuhar 


400 


70,000 


74,000 


do. 


.. 


7 




88 


8049 


.. 


4 


Sohawal 


300 


50.000 


1,00,000 


do. 


,, 


.. 




50 


9435 


8050 


Z059 




Koti 


zoo 


30.000 


54.000 
6,000 


Jaghutlar 


II 


a 




50 


2445 


8048 




6 


Sidpora 


,. 




do; 


„ 


.. 








.. 


., 




7 


Raigaon 


•• 


•• 


94.000 


do. 


.. 






•• 


9439 


8044 


•• 






Western Mahva Agency, 


























z 


Jaora 
Rutlam 


87a 


85.450 


6,55.950 


Nawab 


,, 


X5 


35 


300 


9335 


75 9 


,, 


1 


t 


z,aoo 


95,000 


13,00,000 


Raja 




1 


35 


300 


2331 


75 5 




3 


Sitamao 


350 


a9,ooo 


1,95,000 


da 


.. 


50 


aoo 


24 « 


7523 


,, 


< 


4 


Sailana 


500 


37,000 


z,ai,400 


do. 


.. 


3 


50 


zao 


93 3X 


75 « 


.. 




5 


Piploda 
GuarantMd Tkakitraita. 


60 


8,000 


z,zo,ooo 


do. 


•• 






•• 


9337 


7458 


•• 






Other Pargana* tmder IVesiem Mahoa Agtney-^ 














O/Holkar, 


O/SindMia, 




z. Ajrauda .. 
a. BardiaorBara 
3. Bichhraud .. 


•; 




** 


Thaknr 
da 
da 


1. Mehidpur 
a. Tarrana 


X, Agw. 

a. Shajahanpur. 

3. UHain. 

4. Mandsanr. 

5. Neemocfa. 




4. Bilaoda .. 

5. Dabri 

6. Datana 


•• 




•• 


da 
da 
da 


3. Kaitha 

4. Sund 

5. Kothri 




7. Jawasia .. 

8. Kalukhera .. 






•• 


do. 
da 


6. Raipur 

7. Bhanpura 


0/ Tonk, 
z. Pirawa. 




9. Lalgarh .. * 
to. Narwar 


•• 




•• 


da 
da 


8. Ramjpura 

9. Sundhara 


0/ Dewu, 
z. Alaut. 




iz. Naugaon .. 
la. Nauiana .. 


,, 




.. 


da 


zo. Garaut 


a. Ringnaud. 




,, 




.. 


da 


zz. Jarra Kax\jarra 
za. Kharaoda 
Z3. Antri 


3. Garguchha. 




13. Panlh Piplauda 

14. Piplia 


•• 




•• 


do. 
da 


0/JhaUamar, 




t6. SOTckheraorSarwan.. 


•• 




;; 


da 
da 


Z4. Parda 
15. Manasa 


a. Gangrar. 
3. Awar. 




17. Dhnlatia .. 


•• 






da 


z6. Narayangaiii 


4. PachPahar. 



Note, Sitamau and Sailana formed originally a part of Rutlam, whose Chief is considered the principal Rajput leader in 
Western Malwa. 

* Hasht Bhaia Jaghirs, ('appanages of the eight brothers.) f Chobe Jaghirs. 



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The Central India Agency,— Continued. 



"3 



POUTICAL ACBNaBS 

AND States. 



Bhil or Bhopcmar 
Agency, 

Dhar 

Jabna 
3 AU Rajpnr 
4| Jobat 

GMoruttUed ThakmraUs. 
z. Kathiwara .. 
a. Mathwar .. 

3. Ratanmal .. 

4. Dhi and Dharm Rai 

5. Bakhtgarh .. 

6. Kachlu Baroda 

7. Dhotra or Baisola 

8. Multhan 

9. Niinkhera or Tlrla 

10. Kali Baori 

11. Bara Barkhera 

za. Chhota Barkhera 

Saripur .. 
13. Dhangaon .. 



ESTIMATBO. 



Area. 



Sq.ms 



3,091 

1,500 

800 

aoo 



Popln. 



1,95,000 

60,000 

39,000 

7,000 



Revenue. 



Rs. 



4.37iOOO 

3,35,000 

1,00,000 

17,600 



3.700 
600 



60,01 



Posidon 

of 

Chkr. 



Tribute. 



Raja. 

do. 

do. 

Rana. 



Thakor. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

do. 
do. 



Rs. 



FORCBS. 



I 



I 



300 
aoo 
150 



Long. 
£ 



of Capital 



.Sf 



33-35 
3345 



33 39 



75 ao' 
7436 



feet. 
Z908 



Parganas under control of the Bkofiawar Aeency. 
Of Gwalior (Sindhia,) 
I. Amjhera 4. Sagcu*. 

a. Manawar 5. Bag. 

3. Dikthan o. Baicaner. 

0/ Indore (Holkar), 
z. Chikalda 3. Pitlawad. 3. Lohani. 



Deputy Bhil Agency, 

Manpor Pargana (British) 
Barwani 

Gnaranieed Thaknratet. 

I. Jamnia or Dabir 
a.MAmti 

3. Kajgarh 

4. Chota Kasrawad 

5. Garhi or Bhaisa Kheri. . 
6.*ChaDdgarh .. 

7. Bamdpura .. 
8.*SiIlani and Bakhtgarh.. 
9. Kothide 
10. Chiktiabar .. .. 



z6,ooo 



British 
Raja 



Thakur 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



23* 96' 
23 3 



75 39 
74 57 



I 



Parganas under control 0/ the Depy, Bhil Agency, 
0/ Z>#nMX.— Bagaud. 

Of Indore i ga^^*. Dhurgaon, Khusrawal, 
^ ( Khaigon. 



Indore Agency. 

Indore (HoDcar) 

Population ao,ooo. 
Dewas 

I. BagU 

a. Bhoja Kheri 

3. Karaudia 

4. Singhana 



8,075 
356 



635,450 
35,000 



50,00,000 



Maharaja 
Riga 



94 



4,35,000 
Guaranteed Thakuraies. ^ 
5. Kharsi Jhalaria 9. Bai 

' ■" " * 10. Dhaura Kunjara 

zz. Kaithia 
13. Main 



3,300 
»75 



5.350 
Soo 



6. Pathari 

7. Patharia 

8. Tonk 



" 44175 50 
33 58176 4 

13. Ragugarh 
i4.*Phungat 
1 5.^ Dhangaon 
z6. Gagron 



1786 



Notes on the above States, 

The prindpal states of the Central India Agency are, Gwalior (Sindhia), Indore (Holkar), Bhopal, Dhar, Jaora, Rutlam, 
Jabna. Orchha or Tehri, Panna, Rewah, Chatarpur and Barwani. 

Tne multitude of petty states, held under the immediate guarantee of the British Government, have feudal relations with 
ooe or other of the larger states, and occasionally with more than one. 

With the excepti<Mi of the small outlying British Pargana of Manptir, under the Deputy Bhil Aeency, the whole country 
is foreign territory. An area of 360 square miles was transfened in 1878 from the British district of I^hande^ to Indore, the 
population so transferred is not Icnown. 

The following payments are made by the chie£s named for the maintenance of local corps and contingents, vU. — 

^^fets ^ '»|^^J} For the Malwa contingent. 



Sindhia 

Dhar 

Jabua 

AliRjupur 

Barwani 

Bhopal 




For the Malwa Bhil corps. 



For the Bhopal Battalion. 



The Thakurates marked with a star are under the Chiet Commissioner, Central Provinces. 



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ti4 The Central India Agency, — Continued. 

BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

The country embraced by the Central India Agency, lies within the parallels of 21* 
24' and 26' 52' North, and meridians of 74* o' and 83* o' East, and is bounded on the 
north-east by the British districts of Mirzapur, Allahabad, Banda, Hamirpur, Jalaun, 
Etawah and Agra of the North-Westem Provinces ; on the north-west by the native states 
of Dholpur, Kerowlie, Jeypore, Kotah, Jhallawar, Tonk and Oodeypore of the Rajputana 
Agency ; and on the south-east and south, by the British districts of Nimar, Hoshangabad 
Narsinghpur, Saugor, Damoh, Jubbulpore, Mandla and Bilaspur of the Central Province, 
and the Garhjat states of Chang Bakhar and Koria of Chota Nagpore in the Bengal juris- 
diction. The British districts of Jhansi and Lalitpur of the North-Westem Provinces 
divide this Agency into two main divisions, native Bundelkhand and Baghelkhand, lying 
on the east of the said districts, and the remainder, or Central India portion, on the west. 
Excluding native Bundelkhand and Baghelkhand, the area of the larger or Central India 
division, is about 61,700 square miles, with a population of 4,690,000 souls and a revenue 
of Rs. 201,23,000 ; '^thin this area the states of Indore, Dewas, Rutlam, Dhar, Jabua, Ali- 
Rajpur and Barwani lie on the south-west ; on the south-east is Bhopal lying across the 
Vindhya mountains and resting its southern frontier on the Nerbudda ; in the centre are 
Rajgarh, Khilchipur, Narsinghgarh, Basoda and Karwai ; and in the north are Gwalior 
and Datia. In the smaller or Bundelkhand division, with an area of 24,400 square miles, 
and a population of 3,480,000, Rewah lies on the east, Orchha or Tehri on the west, and 
Panna in the centre. 

The Bundelkhand portion forms the eastern part of the great triangular plateau of 
Central India ; it is inhabited by the peculiar Hindu tribes of Bundelas on the west, and 
Baghelas in Rewah on the east To the west is the river Betwa and its tributary the 
Dhasan flowing to the Jamna, in the centre is the Ken also flowing into the Jamna, 
and to the east is the Soane flowing into the Ganges, with the Khaimur range, — a con- 
tinuation of the Vindhyas, — rising up along its left banL The Panna range, with deep 
ravines and isolated crags on its north-western face, traverses Bundelkhand, and there is a 
broken plateau between the Panna and Khaimur ridges watered by the Tons, a tributary 
of the Ganges. Here is the military station of Nagode, and below the Panna ridge is 
Nowgong. To the north, Bundelkhand terminates in an amphitheatre of precipices, 
shaping the country below into a bay bounded by sandstone cliffs, which again advance 
to near the Jamna at Mirzapur. 

The larger or Central India division, has the great range of the Vindhyas along the 
whole south, abruptly overhanging the valley of the Nerbudda and presenting the appear- 
ance of a weather-beaten coast line. From its summits, varying in height from 1,500 
to 2,500 feet, the northern slope to the Ganges commences, the whole region consisting of 
a broken but elevated country, with ranges of hills watered by the river Chambal, with 
its tributaries the Kali Sind and Parbatti ; the Sind and the Betwa, all flowing north to the 
Jamna and Ganges, and descending from the high table-lands in cascades of great height. 

The rivers that water Central India and Bundelkhand are : the Betwa rising in Bhopal, 
with a length of course of about 360 miles, and an ordinary flood discharge of 200,000 
cubic feet per second; during the rains in extraordinary floods, the discharge is 500,000 cubic 
feet, and the surface velocity ten feet per second. It rises and falls rapidly in a few 
hours, is dry in the summer in the higher portion of its course, and is nowhere navi- 
gable. Its tributary, the Dhasan^ has a length of course of 150 miles, with an ordinary 



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The Central India Agency, — Continued. 115 

flood discharge of 100,000 cubic feet, rising during the rains to 300,000 cubic feet 
per second, and drying up in the summer ; the Ken or Kayan rising among the hills 
on the southern frontier, towards the Saugor division of the Central Provinces, at an 
elevation of 1,700 feet, with a length of course of 230 miles, and with numerous 
rapids and cataracts, some not less than 300 feet ; the water of this river is un- 
wholesome; the Chambal, with its tributaries the iT^i// 5/W, /'ar^^?/// and others, drain- 
ing the whole of Malwa and rising near the station of Mhow, amidst a cluster of 
summits of the Vindhya range, having the local appellation of Janapava, and, after a 
course of 650 miles, flowing into the Jamna ; the Tons rising in the state of Maihar, with 
a length of course of 165 miles ; the Sind^ rising near Sironj in Malwa and flowing into 
the Jamna after a course of 260 miles ; and the Soane^ rising in the hills of Amarkantak 
and draining the Baghelkhand tract. 

The northern part of the country, of moderate elevation, has a climate partaking of 
the torrid character of the neighbouring tracts of the North- Western Provinces and of 
Rajputana. In these parts the climate during the rainy season, and for a short time after- 
wards, is exceedingly unhealthy, fevers being then very rife in consequence of the moisture, 
imbibed by the superficial diluvial soil, being prevented from passing off" by an imperme- 
able substratum of sandstone. During the dry and hot seasons the climate is not un- 
healthy. The middle, the southern and the western parts, or those comprised within the 
Malwa tract, with little exception, have a mild and rather equable climate, resulting from 
the greater elevation of the surface. The cool season comprises the period from Novem- 
ber to February, the hot season succeeds and continues to the middle of June, when the 
periodical rains set in and last to the close of September, the average fall being about 
fifty inches. During the rains the thermometer has a very moderate range, rarely more 
than from 72* to 8o^ in the winter it sometimes falls three or four degrees below freezing 
point. During the sultry season the hot winds are comparatively mild and of short dura- 
tion, though the thermometer sometimes rises to nearly 100° during the day, but the 
nights are for the most part cool and refreshing, 

The population of the country within this Agency is of a mixed kind, comprising 
besides Mahrattas (the ruling order), Bundelas, Baghelas, Jats, Rajputs and Mahomedans, 
the last being estimated at about a twentieth of the whole. The density of population for 
the whole of the Agency is about 95 to the square mile. 

Most of the territory under this Agency is well-cultivated and fertile, and the whole 
of the Malwa plateau most fertile, producing in abundance and excellence, wheat, rice and 
other grains, and pulses, sugar-cane, cotton and especially opium, the poppy producing it 
being so generally cultivated, that when in bloom it gives the country the appearance of 
a vast garden. The state of Jaora contains the best poppy producing lands in Malwa, 
and yields yearly about 1,000 chests of opium. The town of Rutlam is the principal 
opium mart in western Malwa. Tobacco is also much cultivated and is of excellent 
quality. 

The mineral resources of the whole country are extensive, iron, coal, copper and lime- 
stone abound, and about twelve or fifteen miles north-east of the town of Panna, the capital 
of the state of that name in Bundelkhand, is an adamantiferous tract from which diamonds 
are extracted, of the value of several thousand pounds sterling a year, the revenues from 
this source being divided between Panna and Charkari. The mines are less prosperous 
now than formerly, but it is believed that inexhaustible diamond producing strata exist 
in that locality, and if the mines were properly worked their productiveness would be 



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ii6 



The Central India Agency,— Continued. 



found not to have diminished. The diamonds produced here are of four kinds, the 
motichaly clear and brilliant ; the manik of greenish hue ; the Panna tinged with orange ; 
and the banspaty blackish. The stones are, however, inferior to the Golconda diamonds 
written of in Part III., Madras Presidency. 

A trunk road from Gwalior to Bombay vi^ Indore runs through the whole length 
of the Cental India division, and the ' Holkar State Railway' from Khandwa station on the 
Great Indian Peninsula Line, runs through Indore to Rutlam and Neemuch, beyond which 
the line to Nusseerabad is in course of construction, as also is a branch line, called the 
'Ehopal State Railway', connecting Bhopal with the Great Indian Peninsula Railway at 
Itarsi station. The Jubbulpore extension line of the East Indian Railway, from Allahabad 
to Jubbulpore, runs through Bundelkhand 



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III. 
THE MADRAS PRESIDENCY: 

Comprising 21 Distriets, 



WITH THE 



NATIVE STATES ATTACHED THERETO. 

Under a Governor. 



MYSORE (NATIVE STATE) & COORG. 

Under a Chief Commissioner. 



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ii8 



The Madras Government 

Geographical Area of the Territories under the Civil and Political control of the 
Governor of Madras, 1878, 



Principal Geographical Divisions. 


Area. 


British Possessions directly Administered — 

The twenty-one districts of the Presidency_(the country known 
as the Northern Circars and Carnatic) 


Square Miles. 
138,318 


The Native Possessions or States 


9,745 


Grand Total 


148,063 



Prevailing Langiuxges. 

English and Hindustani, generally spoken or understood more or less throughout 

OoRiYA, in district Ganjam. 

Telugu, in districts Vizagapatam, Godavari, Kistna, Nellore, Cuddapah, Bellary 
Kurnoolj and in a part of North Arcot 

Tamil, in districts Madras, Chingleput, North Arcot, South Arcot, Tanjore, Trichino- 
poly, Madura, Tinnevelly, Coimbatore, Nilgiris and Salem. 

Cakarese and Maxayalam, in districts South Canara and Malabar, and native states 
of Travancore and Cochin. 

TuLU, in a limited portion of the South Canara district. 

Besides the above six Dravidian languages, the hill tribes of certain districts have 
dialects of their own, also of a Dravidian type. 

In the whole Presidency there are about 11,610,000 persons who speak the Telugu 
language; 14,715,000 the Tamil-, Iy6ggy000 the Canarese ; 2,324,000 the Afalajalam; 
29j40o Ihe Tt4ft*, and 640,000 the Ooriya and hill languages. 



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119 



I I 

'^ -e I 

6 & 



11 



•ECoQi 'jooiano 'wpwAipnQ 'epcMza^ *6[)Bd«a 'jBpirea "88* '9^ ^jUiBiBdjinsBi^ 



^ 8 

O w 



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M r»i O* 



I 



> 



6 M < 



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124 The Madras Presidency,— Continued. 

Government Taluks and Zamindaris in the several Districts of the Madras Presidency, 



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Tall- K 5 anp Zauimdaris. 


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Taluks anp Zauindaeis. 


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Ganjiim. 


Sq.Ms 




Ra. 




Viutgapatam^ — C ontd . 


Sq. Ms. 




Rs. 




Government Taluks. 










Zamindaris,— ConetnntA. 








, 


Gumsur 


377 


157.960 


J:Ji'2^ 


16 


Srikunnana (of Virianaga- 








2 


Chicacole 


379 


200,655 




ram, in Ganjam.) 


«7 


16,937 


.. 


3 


Berhampore 


399 


243.685 


3,19,322 


19 


Madagulu 






.. 




Zamindaris. 








Merangi 
Kur jpam 






•• 


I 


Surada 


46 


X5,324 
77.228 


4,000 


20 


Belgam 






.. 


a 


Attizada 


149 


60,000 


31 


Sangamvalsa 






.. 


3 


Palur 


l6 


4.'73 


553 


33 


Chemudo 






.« 


4 


Humma 


5 


2,754 


1,171 


33 


PachipenU 






.. 


I 


Beridi 


14 


10,960 


4,300 


24 


Andra 






.. 


Kallikotta 


84 


42.590 


19,000 


25 


Kasipor 
Uratla 






• • 


I 

9 


Karakavalasa 


\ 

6 


7.795 


4,048 


36 






• • 


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GottipalU 


3.695 
4,35> 


4,048 

49!o88 


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Sriporam 
Melupaku 






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lO 


Takkali 


63 


58.054 


29 


Manterra 






• • 


11 


Tarla , 


39 


a4,63| 


4,000 


30 


KuppUi 






I* 


13 

«3 


Jarangi 
Yellamanchilli . . 


3 

X 




X,003 
654 


3« 
33 


KintaK 
Kasimkota 






•• 


14 


Beddam 


3 


317 


89 


33 


Gudicherla 






.• 


15 


Belamarapalavalasa 


3 


855 


1,043 












16 
17 


Gopalapuram 
Chittivalasa 


5 
7 


\:^^ 


3,699 
a.074 




Godavari. 








18 
»9 


ParlaKimedi .. 
Urlam 


45a 
z5 


252.391 

xi,o6x 


83,139 
13,582 












ao 
ax 
sa 
«3 
«4 


Danta 
Tilaru 
Towdam 
Akkayavalasa 


3 

X 

7 


3.220 
6,x8o 

485 


2,309 

278 
1,193 


X 

3 
3 
4 
5 


Peddapnr 
Rajahmundry .. 
Amalapor 
Ramachandrapcir 
EUore 


3,058 
437 
507 
729 


xxx,489 


a.35.5St 
x,57,303 

a.19.794 


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Talasainudraiin ■ • • . 


X 


923 


a,383 


6 


Emagudain • • • • 
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"^ 


X45,7«5 
I07,49> 


x,95.2i7 


a6 


Malgam 


3 


916 


572 


7 


6,16,189 


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Dharakota 


SO 


31,263 


35,000 


8 


Narsapur . . • . 


450 


177,876 


5.74,8ax 


a8 


Seerghar 


31 


.1:11 


5,500 


9 


Bhivni^venun 


4x6 


9a,457 


4.36,316 


39 


Chinna Kimedi .. 


55 


30,000 












30 


Aska 


4 


7.7" 


*'^IZ 




Zamindaris. 








3x 


Davabhamy 


4 


3.539 


5,188 












32 
33 


Kurla 

Pedda Kimedi .. 


78 


5.457 
40,810 


5,455 
a3,5oo 


3 


Ambarapet 

Coconada . . ) 

Coringa . . I 


x68 


66,944 


•• 


34 


Chikati 


is 


40.789 


34,000 


3 


84,916 


,, 


35 


Surangi 


X5 


12,919 
5.8«3 

»8,450 
8,454 


3,500 


4 


Gutala 


., 




,, 


36 


Jarada 

Jalantra 

Barwa 


9 
36 
xo 


3,000 
7,000 
7,800 


\ 


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Kesanakura 
iKirlampodi 


•• 




•• 


39 


Mandusa 


36 


34,508 


X4,ooo 


Kolanka 


, 




,, 


40 


Budarasinghi 


4 


3,244 


Soo 


9 


Kotham 


,, 




,, 


41 


Bodagadah 








10 


Gopalpur 
Nidadavol 


,, 




,, 


42 


Kattinsiah 
HautgHar 




,, 


.. 


11 


,, 




,, 


43 


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,, 


.. 


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,, 




,, 




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13 
M 


Pattesam 
Pithaparam 


'x88 


79,606 


•• 












'5 


Rampa 


.. 




.. 


z 


Golgonda 


874 


36,730 


x,03,734 


16 


Tuni 
TangeUamudi .. 


376 


Sosaox 


•• 


a 


Sarvasiddi 


960 


139,185 


1,90,595 


Vasantavada 


,, 




,, 


3 


Palkondah 

Zamindaris, 


43a 


x9i,9o8 


•• 


19 

so 


Vigayammapet . . 
Viravaram 


•• 




;; 


z 


Vizagapatam 


ai6 


90,467 


,. 


31 
33 


Bhadrachellam .. 
Rakapalli 


88s 


a7,695 


.. 


s 


«43 


113,079 


• • 


23 


Ellainanchilli 


,, 




,, 


3 

4 


Srungavarapukota 
Chepudipalfi .. 


615 


Ifoia? 


,, 












5 


Viravalli 


688 


i66;i84 


.. 




Kistna, 








6 

I 


Anakapalli 

Golgonda (Hill Tracts) .. 


597 
500 


'i'slig 


•• 












Parvadpur 


403 


133,830 


• . 


X 


Gudivada 


i 


87,138 


4,49.508 


9 


Vizianagaram 1 . • . 


333 


149,930 


** 


3 


Bandar 


i64,5a5 


3,10,031 


xo 

XT 


Gajapatinagaram 


xai.758 
140,739 


•• 


3 

4 


Bapatla 
Guntoor 


«94 


X43,6a9 
136,997 


5,90,405 
4,07,000 


xa 


sSur !.' 


333 


77,006 


.. 


5 


Sattanapalli . . . . 


101,738 


lln 


X3 


Ganapnr 


3,000 


63."7 


.. 


6 


Repalli 


6aa 


169,9x3 


X5 


Royagadda 

Jeypur, Kirapad..' "^ 


. X|000 


59.780 
r32,655 

87:36^ 

I3,8oi 


'• 


\ 


Nandigama 
Bexwada 


i 


t:S? 


3,04,347 

>,57.092 
3.40,585 




., Kolupa.. I 
„ Navarangapur ( 


8,500 




9 


Narasaropetta 


130,619 
130,658 






10 


Palnad 


',095 


3,31,703 




,. Malkan^i ; 




.. 


11 


Vinukonda 


561 


64.508 


x,47.ao4 



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The Madras Presidency,— Contmued. 

Government Taluks and 21amindariSy — Continued. 



125 



TALUItS Attn ZaU[NDABI& 



A'istiia, — C ont luu e d . 

Challapalli 

Chevendra 

Chintalapatti 

Devarakota 

Golapalli 

Gudur 

Nunnastalam 

Nuzvid 

Tiruvur 

Vallur 

Vissanapetta 

Nellore, 
Government Taluks, 

Nellore 

Gudur 

Ongole 

Kandukur 

Kanigiri 

Kavali 

Udayagiri 

Atmakur 

Zamtndaris. 
Chundi _ ^ .. 

Venkata^iri Divisions 

Adanki 

Darsi 

Podili 

Polur 

Cuddapah, 
Government Talnks. 

Cuddapah 

Royachoti 

Kadtri 

Voilpad 

Madanapalli 

Jammalmadugu 

Proddatur 

Pulivendla 

Budwel 

Sidhout 

PuUampet 

Bellary. 
Government Taluks, 
Bellary 
Adoni 
Alur .. 
Gooty.. 
Todpatry 
Pennacondah 
Hindupara 
Madakasira 
Huvanadgalli 
Harpanhaili 
Hospet 
Kudlighi 
Raidroog 
Anantapur 
Dhannaveram 

Kumool, 
Government Taluks. 

Nadikotkur 

Ramalkota 

Cumbum 

Markapur 

Nandial 

Sirwell 

Pottikonda 

Koilkuntla 



Sq.M> 



56X 
257 



627 
8x3 
710 
722 
695 
533 
595 
608 



^05 



1,207 
649 

1,442 
708 

670 
343 
579 
704 
508 
609 



677 
1,014 
772 
654 
481 

623 
592 

1,229 



1,186 
836 
885 

«.039 
777 
487 

1,190 
637 



i 

I 






Taluks aho Zauikoarj!;. 



i 



3 



«o7.465 
55,662 



179,769 
147,141 
195,068 
138,375 
127,258 
81,336 
100,985 
103,802 



73,139 
62,934 



163,013 
128,162 
140,948 
«45,59i 
135,468 
109,965 
102,744 
110,405 
93,051 
76,667 
145,180 



182,244 
181,583 
98,230 
144,568 
117,211 
88,754 
87,895 
79,458 
89,538 
85,729 
93,424 
93,228 
87,779 
102,761 
120,608 



101,866 
146,195 
123,042 

92,665 
107,320 

71,066 

'73'434 
98,844 



Rs. 



1,08,221 
20,829 



3,20,805 
3,23,604 
3,27.151 
2,86,834 

69,442 
1.72,639 

67,196 
1,61,927 



2,35,064 
1,59.013 
1.55,7^0 

»,9i,»57 
2,10,648 
2,03,116 
i,e 9,005 
1,72,855 
1,38,839 
1,17,940 
2,0,6424 



2,97,582 
2,60,907 
2,76,953 
2,21,631 
1,76,153 
1,28,020 

1,40,273 
1,22,625 
1,42,731 
1,15.472 
1,56,398 
1,12,609 
1,57.367 
1,40,779 
1,65,333 



2,21,277 
1,81,541 
1,66,686 
1,01, t6o 
2,05,527 
1,66,462 

2,35,429 
2,33,544 



CkiHgleput. 
Govemmeut Taluks. 
Trivellore 
Chingleput 
Madurantakum .. 
Conieveram 
Saiaapet 
Ponneri 

Zamtndaris. 

Tiruvur 
Pallaveram 

North Arcot, 
Government Taluks. 
Chittoor 
Palmanair 
Chendragiri 
Arcot . . 
Vdlorc 
Gudlattum 
Wallaja 
Wandcwash 
Polur . . 

Zamtndaris. 
Ami . . 
Bangaru 
Kalahasti 
Kangundi 
Karvetnagar 
Naragtinti 
Pulicheria 
Panganur 

South Arcot, 
Government Taluks. 

Cu.Ja.ihre 
TrinoiiisL-iy 
Tindcvanuio 
Vilhipuram 

Virdachcljjm. 

CI iciiajnbaram . . 

ThkoJant 

KiUlakurkbi 

Tanjore. 
Government Taluks. 

Negapatam 

Nannilam 

Tanjore . . 

Combaconum 

Pattukota 

Mayaveram 

Shealli 

Manargudi 

Tritrapoondy 

Zamindari. 

Gandharvakot 

Irichinopoly, 
Government Taluks. 

Trichinopoly 

Museri 

ICulatalai 

Perambalore 

OodiarpoIIiem 

Zamtndaris. 
Kodaiyur 
Kattuputur ^ 
Marangapuri 
Turayur 







443 


149,898 


635 


132,328 


197,308 


447 


168,036 


308 


186,404 


312 


104,210 


965 


213,045 


664 


60,211 


553 


99,628 


379 


157,391 


289 


179,156 


443 


162,980 


516 


216,204 


413 


153,507 


330 


109,150 


170 


77,679 


602 


135,104 


179 


P'S*7 


634 


289,894 


524 


109,282 


459 


284,849 


VTo 


164,657 


239,754 


611 


236,108 


566 


178,504 


. 393 


239,133 


500 


216,246 


607 


196,566 


242 


200,733 


294 


207,407 


635 


344,339 


341 


341,034 


945 


237,423 


276 


219,358 


170 


107,459 


300 


161,264 


536 


154,714 


519 


306,461 


931 


257,174 
228,313 


667 


690 


^70,567 


777 


237,893 



lU. 



2,81,794 

2,22,376 

4,22,563 
4,05,905 
2,52,384 
2,11,403 



2,52,348 

79,537 
99,952 
3,23,68s 
1,91,972 
2.48,216 
3,82,549 
3,56,291 
2,01,450 



5,933 

1,76,816 

22,959 
i,8o,49S 



66,859 



2,98,648 
5,53,798 
4,70,541 
3.37,577 
6,70,712 
4,02,020 
3,24,44X 



3,98,251 
7,02,225 
5,95,456 
7,66,649 
1,87,003 
5,65,963 
2,72,933 
4,05,23s 
3,39,658 



4,60,429 
3,44,411 
2,30,525 
2,40,960 
2,36,144 



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126 



The Madras Presidency,— Coniinued. 

Government Taluks and Zamindaris^ — Continued. 



i 


Taluks and Zamindaris. 


1 


S^ 


Uod 
Revenue. 


d 


Taluks and Zamindaris. 


1 


£ 


^1 




Madura. 


Sq.Ms 




Rs. 




Coimbaiore, 


Sq.M$. 




Rs. 




Cffotrmtunt Taluks. 










Gmfemment Taluks. 


















1 


Coimbatore 


635 


243.995 


3,09,370 


] 


Periacolum 


'l,200 


317,416 ' 2,65,063 


3 : Karur.. 


564 


175,659 


2,70,264 


3 


Melur 


5M 


128,983 2,53,247 


3 1 Dharapuram 


775 


217.493 


3,36.131 


3 


Dindigul 


i,io8 


324.3^ 3»77.2" 


4 ' Bhavani 


582 


102,813 


1,09,808 


4 


Palani 


983 


134,831 1 2,62,142 


5 Erode.. 


595 


233.564 


3,95,5>o 


5 


Madura 


446 


33i.4>8 3.»7.85i 


6 1 Udamalpetai 


365 


133,650 


1,98.675 


6 


Terumangalum . . 


618 


a4if3i5 ! 3.69.192 


7 Palladam 


741 


337,808 


3.76,366 












8 Pollachi 


428 


"67,546 


2.14,984 




Zamindatis. 








9 1 Collcgal 
, 10 , Sattiamungalam .. 


J^ 


90.830 
169,916 


86,345 
3,24,74a 


1 


Ramnad 


3.351 


504,131 3,38,686 


j 










a 


Shivagunga 


i»557 


434.^3 . 2.88,317 




Zamindari. 








3 

4 


Ayakudi 
Bodinayakanor .. 








;; 


1 


Andipatri 


•• 




•• 


5 


Idaiyankotai 












Sotith Canara, 








6 

7 


Kannivadi 
Ammayanayakanur 












Giwemmtnt Taluks. 








8 


Periyur 


.. 








I 


Mangalore 


86s 


242,779 


3,67, > 35 


9 


Rainagiri 


.. 








3 


Uppenangadi 


>.o47 


107,723 


1,44,267 


lo 


Rcttayampadi .. 


• • 








3 


Udipi.. 


893 


231,570 


3,25,100 


11 


Saptur 
Veflur 










4 


Kundapur 


525 


"3.7«3 
333,578 


2,07,882 


12 










5 


Kassergode 


1.064 


2,43*195 


»3 


Gantamanayakanar 


.. 






























SaUm. 










Tinnevelly, 










Government Taluks. 










Government Talnks, 








1 


Salem 


993 


393.805 


4,56,871 


1 


Tinnevelly 


346 


184,109 


3,53.173 ' 


a : Athur.. 

3 1 Oossoor 

4 j Kistnagiri^ 

5 Dannapuri 

6 1 Trepatore 




1,169 

1 


164,006 


2,21.393 


3 

3 

4 
5 


Ottapidaram 

Tcnkarai 

Nangunery 


1,164 
303 


296,376 2,83,901 , 
234.346 5,54,434 1 
178,078 3,84.445 . 
163,215 4.21.401 




193.037 
170,233 
190,636 
190,800 


1,93,902 
1,73.923 


6 


Tenkasi 

Srivilliputtur 

Satur.. 


337 
463 


122,001 
176,954 

156,862 


2,46,372 

3.28,845 ; 
2,13.7^7 


I 

9 


uiicngarai 

Namakal 

Trichengode 




808 
633 


153,801 
261,009 
349,678 


3« 
3,67,«« 


9 


Sankaranainarkovil 
Zamindaris. 


609 


182,018 


2,50,565 




Malabar, 
Government Taluks. 








1 


Budur 


.. 






I 


Calicut 


360 


189,768 


», 28,975 


3 


Ettiyapuram 












2 Cochin 




3 


19,826 


18,679 


3 


Mannarkot 












3 


Cherikal 




671 


257,377 


2,13,653 


4 


Nagalapuram .. 












4 


Kottiem 




460 


143,561 


99,948 


5 


Sevagin 

Sevalpatti 

Urkad 














Kurambranad 




527 


243.75r 


3,09,306 


6 












6 


Palghat 




681 


325,855 


2,77,905 


9 












I 

9 


Ponani 




450 


374.756 


3,08,853 


Singampatti 
UttunuUlai 












Emaad 
VaUuvanad 




997 
932 


387,93<5 
393,482 


2,00,555 
2,47,229 


lO 


Vadimitta 




'• 




10 


Wynad 


E91 


100,719 


1,11.379 



Notes, 

The Polygara m the Northern Circars were at first treated as Feudatories, but in 1803, a permanent settlement was intro- 
duced, and these chiefs became and were classed as ordinary Zamindars, no longer holding a political status. The chiefs of 
Vizianagram and Jeypur bear the title of Maharaja, and those of Tiruvur, Pallaveram, Bobilli, Salur, Sripuram, Kolanka, 
Kotham, Kalahasti, Karvetnagar, Pithapuram, and Venkatagiri, the title of Raja. 

The Ganjam Agency. 

In the Zamindaris of Surada, Chinna-Kimedi, Parla-Rimedi, Pedda-Kimedi, Bodagada, Surangi, Jorada, Jalantra, Mandusa, 
Rudarasinghi and Kattangiah, in the western part of the Ganjam District, are certain portions of country known as the Afaliak 
Tracts, inhabited chiefly by Khonds and Savarahs. These tracts cover an area of 3,500 square miles, with a populaticm of 
186,000 souls, and though held on Saneuis by their respective Zamindars, who derive more or less revenue theiefrom, are undo* 
thc direct jurisdiction of the Collector of Ganjam, who is also Agent. The term Maliah or Malwa means highlands, and is the 
Dame given by the Khonds to these upland regions of the district. 

The Vizagapatam Agency. 

This Agency embraces Jeypur with those portions of the Zamindaris of Madagulu or Madgole, Pachipcnta, Kurupam and 
Merangi which lie within the hills, also the hill Mutas of Palcondah, those of Golakonda, or Golgonda, and the hill Zamindari 
of Kasipur. These tracts are scheduled districts in the same way as the Ganjam Maliahs. 



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The Madras Presidency, — Continued. 

List of the Ports of the Madras Presidency, 



127 



No. 


Names. 


No. 


Names. 


No. 


Names. 


I 


Chief Port Madras 


50 


Gopalapatam 


99 


* Podubidri 


a 


Adrampatam 


51 


Gopalpur 


100 


Pakala 


3 


Ammapatam 


52 


Ipurpalem 


lOI 


Pamanji 


4 


* Atukuyi ^ 


5i 


Iskapalli 


102 


' Parapanna 


5 


* Attangarai 


54 


Itamukkala 


103 


Parapanangadi 


6 


* Attupuram 


55 


Invalladinne 


104 


* Pasipatam 


1 


Bada^arai 


56 


* Kanuparta 


105 


Paumben 


Bainaur 




* Kapatt 


106 


Pentacotia 


9 


* Balaipatam 


58 


Kasargodi 


107 


Penuraudi 


xo 


Bapanapadu 


59 


Katacacheri 


108 


* Pillaimadam 


x< 


Barkur 


S 


Kattumavadi 


109 


Point Cal>inere 


X2 


Barwah 


61 


* Kavvayi 


XIO 


Ponani 


X3 


Bekal 


6a 


KiUkarai 


III 


Ponnapudi 
Porto Novo 


14 




63 


Kodiempalliem 


112 


15 


BimH^tam 


64 


* Kolam 


"3 


• Pudi 


x6 


65 


• Kottaikal 


114 


Pudimadaka 


X7 


* Bodivanipalem 
Cadalondi 


<36 


Koctaipatam 


"5 


* Pudiangadi (MaJabar) 


18 


67 


Koctapalem 


116 


* Pudiangadi ( ditto ) 


»9 


Calicut 


68 


Kottapatam 


117 


* Pudupatam 


ao 


Colinsapatain 


69 


Krishnajipatam 


118 


Pundi 


ax 


CaUayi 


70 


Krishnapatam 


119 


Quilandi 
Ramapatam 


aa 


CaDnanore 


7* 


Kulasegarpaalam 


lao 


83 


• Carungadu 


72 


Kundapur 


i«i 


* Rameswaram 


»4 


* Caup 


73 


« Kurkuyi 


122 


Shirur 


as 


Chenna3rapalein 


74 


• Kuttayi 


123 


Sanapur 


a6 


• Chombayi 


75 


* Madayi 


124 




a? 


Chowghat 


76 


Maipadu 


"5 


* Talayi 


28 


Cochin 


77 


* Malpe 


is6 


Tanur 


39 


Coconada 


78 


Mandapam 
Man^alore 


127 


Tellicherry 


30 


Coilpatam 


79 


128 


* Terupalancudi 


3x 


* Conada 


80 


Manjeshwar 


129 


Tirumalavasal 


3a 


Coringa 


81 


* Marakayapatam 


»3o 


Tondi 


33 


* Covelong 


82 


Masulipalam 


>3i 


Toputorai 


34 


Cuddalore (South Arcot) 


83 


* Merkanam 


132 


Tranquebar 


35 


• Cuddalore (Malabar) 


84 


* Molankadava 


'33 


* Trikodi 


36 


Cumbla 


85 


Morutota 


»34 


Tummalapenta 


37 


* Damodarapatam 


86 


Mottupalli 


»35 


lupili 


38 


Devipsuam 


87 


• Mudiapatam 


136 


Tuticorin 


39 


88 


Mulki 


'37 


* Uchil 


40 


Dugarazupatam 


89 


• Muttungal 


'38 


• Udiavar 


4» 


* Elatur 


90 


Muttupettai fTanjore) 
* Muttupettai (Madura) 


»39 


Udipi 


42 


* Emanangundu 


91 


140 


• Uppada 


43 


* Ennore 


92 


Nagayalanka 


»4i 


* Vaippar 


44 


* Ermal 


93 


Nagore 


142 


Valangani 


45 


• Ervadi 


94 


* Nambtdalai 


'43 


* Valanokkam 


46 


• Etticolam 


95 


Narsapur 


»44 


* Vedalai 


47 


• Ezhara, 


96 


Nayakankotta 


M5 


* Velliangode 


48 


Oangadipalain 


% 


Negapatam 


146 


Vizagapatam 


49 


Ganjam 


98 









llie places marked with an asterisk* are ports in which there is no trade at present, but which are authorised places Tor 
the landing and shipment of goods. 

Non British Indian Ports, 



X Aleppy 
a Anicngo 

3 Colachel 

4 Katur 

5 Kayankolam 

6 Manakudi 


Travancore, 

7 Manacodam 

8 Mangalamarattupula 

9 Palliport 

10 Paranur 

11 Puar 


12 Punthorai 

13 Poracand 

14 Pattanam 

15 Quilon 

16 Velinjam 


Cochin. 

1 Cranganore 

2 Maliyapuram 

3 Narrakal 



BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 
Area, Position, Boundaries^ &c. 

The Madras Presidency occupies the southern portion of the peninsula of India, with 
a considerable extension north-eastward along the coast of the Bay of Bengal. It is bounded 
on the north and north-west by the districts of Kanara and Dharwar of the Bombay Presi- 
dency, Hyderabad or the Nizam's Dominions, and the southern native states of Bastar and 
Kalahandi of the Central Provinces ; on the north-east by the province of Orissa under the 



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1 2 8 The Madras Presidency, — Continued, 

Bengal jurisdiction ; on the east and south-east by the Bay of Bengal ; on the south by the 
Indian Ocean, and on the west by the Arabian Sea. The eastern portion of the Presidency 
extends from Cape Comorin, in latitude 8** 4', to the northern extremity of district Gan- 
jam, touching Orissa in latitude 20** 18'; the western portion extends to the coast at the 
eastern extremity of Mysore native state, in latitude 13° 50'. The greatest length from the 
extremity of Gan jam to Cape Comorin being about 1,000 miles, and the greatest width, 
measured from the coast at the eastern extremity of Mysore to Madras, about 390 miles. 
The total extent of sea coast is about 1,700 miles, without, however, any single really good 
harbour. Exclusive of the native states, the area of the Presidency is estimated at 138,318 
square miles, including these states it may be taken at 148,063 square miles. 

The districts of Ganjam, Vizagapatam, Godavari and Kistna, are now known as 
the Northern Districts or the Northern Circars. Prior to 1859-60 these Circars consisted 
of five districts, but in that year the three districts of Rajamundry, Masulipatam and 
Guntoor were divided to form the present Godavari and Kistna districts. Under the 
Nizam's government the divisions of these two last named districts were as follow : — 
Guntoor, Condapilly, Ellore, Rajamundry and Chicacole. 

The districts of Nellore, Madras, Chingleput and South Arcot, are called the East 
Central Districts. In 1859-60 Madras town and Chingleput were amalgamated into a 
single district, but in 1870 this amalgamated district was again divided as before, leaving 
the administration of the Madras town district in the hands of the Sea Customs 
Collector. 

North Arcot, Kurnool, Bellary and Cuddapah are called the Ceded Districts; 
Salem, Coimbatore and Nilgiris, the West Central Districts; Tanjore, Trichinopoly, 
Madura and Tinnevelly, the Southern Districts ; and South Canara and Malabar, the West 
Coast Districts. 

Topography y &c. 
The principal features which give character to the portion of India embraced with- 
in the Presidency of Madras, are the two mountain ranges which run through it on the east 
and on the west, viz., the Eastern and the Western Ghats. The former range runs for some 
distance almost parallel with the eastern coast, the latter with the western. Starting from the 
north, the Eastern Ghats, running with the coast to about 50 miles north of Madras, sweep 
to the south-west and eventually unite, in the vicinity of the Nilgiris, with the Western 
Ghats, which extend to Cape Comorin on the one side, and to the north-western extremity 
of the Presidency on the other. These two great ranges may be said to form, — one on the 
south-west, the other on the south-east, — the buttresses or walls of the triangular table-land 
included between them, commonly called the Deccan. Though this table-land rises consi- 
derably towards the south, it has a general slope of surface to the east and south-east as 
indicated by the large streams flowing in that direction, and emptying themselves into the 
Bay of Bengal. The lowland lying between the base of the Western Ghats, and the sea, is 
of less breadth than that lying in the like situation with respect to the Eastern Ghats, being 
in some places not more than 25, and nowhere more than 50 miles in breadth. Compared 
with the Western Ghats, the Eastern, south of the Godavari river, are of trifling elevation, 
the mean height of the chain being about 1,500 feet, but attaining a higher elevation as the 
range approaches southward, near Madras and the junction with the other range in the vici- 
nity of the Nilgiris. North of the Godavari river the Eastern Ghats rise to an elevation o( 
upwards of 5,000 feet, the highest points being Gallikonda 5,346 feet, and Galli Parvatam 
4,988 feet The Western Ghats on the other hand, rise to over 6,000 feet, and at the 



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The Madras Presidency,— Continued. 129 

Nilgiris culminate to 8,760 feet The Palni hills to the south of the Nilgiris, attain a 
height of from 6,500 to 7,100 feet ; they are about 80 miles distant from Trichinopoly, 
and 40 from Madura, and have been recently proposed as a site for a Sanitarium. The 
Shervaroy hills on the east of the Nilgiris, approach to within five miles of Salem and 
attain a height of 5,260 feet. Owing to the superior height of the western range, and 
its vicinity to the coast, all the head waters of the great rivers of the Presidency origi- 
nate there, and traverse the Eastern Ghats on their way to the sea. 

The principal rivers are the Godavari, the Krishna or Kistna, in their lower courses, 
the Penner, Paler and the Cauvery. Numerous feeders, the chief of which is the Tunga- 
badhra, from the Western Ghats and the plateau of the Deccan, discharge themselves 
into the Kistna and Penner. The rivers of the western and and southern coasts are 
numerous, but necessarily short in their courses and unimportant, as are also those in the 
extreme north-eastern districts of the Presidency. 

The coast on the west, called Malabar^ from the north-western extremity to Mangalore 
is in general, bold ndB rocky ; from Mangalore to Cape Comorin, it is considerably lower 
and either muddy or sandy, having several shallow inlets termed " Backwaters," extend- 
ing in some cases a considerable distance (a couple of hundred miles) inland, parallel with 
the coast, more or less navigable, and receiving the drainage of the streams coming 
from the Western Ghats. Cochin is situated on the principal of these openings. Cape 
Comorin itself is low and sandy, but a few miles inland, and to the north of the extreme 
point, the southern summits of the ghats rise in lofty and majestic peaks known as the 
Palni hills. To the north-east of Cape Comorin, the coast, for 166 miles, is low, rocky and 
much beset by reefs and is little frequented, as navigation, northwards into the Bay of 
Bengal, is obstructed and rendered impracticable for vessels by a sandbank extending 
from the main-land of India to Ceylon, called Adam's bridge, which has only two navi- 
gable channels, not however deep enough for the passage of large craft The sea here, called 
the gulf of Manar, has on the coast to the north-west the harbour of Tuticorin. From 
Adam's bridge to Point Calymere, on the north of Palk's straits, the shore has no bold 
features. From Point Calymere the Coromandel Coast commences, and holds a direction 
due north across the estuaries of the Cauveiy, which enclose a delta having a base of 82 
miles towards the sea, where are the ports of Negapatam and Tranquebar ; the Coro- 
mandel Coast continues to hold a northerly direction for 297 miles further to Gondegam, 
where the river Musi is considered to bound it to the northward, and retains the same 
character of slight elevation and general sandy formation, with shallow water along shore. 
Blackwood harbour is the only shelter throughout this distance for large ships ; at all 
the other ports along this coast ships must be anchored in the open sea. From Gonde- 
gam the shore is termed the Golgonda Coast, holding a direction north-east for 270 
miles to the southern point of district Vizagapatam, and passing the estuaries of the Kistna 
and Godavari. Here the coast is so low that it is often inundated. Masulipatam> 
Cocanada and Coringa are the most important maritime places on this coast, which 
terminates in Latitude 17* 15'. The Orissa coast commences at this point, here the 
coast becomes bold and rocky, and retains this character for about 230 miles to the 
north-eastern extremity of the Presidency. The eastern coast has a few extensive lakes 
which require notice. To the north of Madras is Lake Pulicat, an extensive salt-water 
lagoon, about 33 miles in length from north to south, by 1 1 in breadth ; it contains 
several islands and communicates with the sea by very narrow channels. Lake Colair in the 
Kistna district, between the rivers Kistna and Godavari, formed by the overflowing of 
those rivers, and having a length of 47 miles and a breadth of 14. Lake Chilka on the 



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130 



The Madras Presidency,— Continued. 



Orissa coast, in the extreme north-east, under the Bengal jurisdiction, 42 miles in length, 
by 15 in breadth, and separated from the sea only by a narrow bank of sand. The 
name signifies salt lake; it is very shallow, and nowhere exceeds six feet in depth. 

The rivers of southern India give but little assistance to inland communication, but 
by means of canals and excellent roads everywhere, this convenience is attained ; there are 
besides several lines of Railway running through the Presidency, the Madras Railway, 858 
miles in length, and the Southern India Railway, 612 miles long, connect Madras with 
Bombay and the principal towns in the Deccan, as well as with those in the west and south ; 
the extension from Bangalore, to connect Madras with Mysore, also a branch line to 
Pondicherry being in progress. Steamers also leave Madras regularly for almost every 
principal port in India. 

The following are some of the principal Canals of the Madras Presidency : — 



GoDAVARi Delta System. 



EasUr-H Dtlta, 

Main Canal 
Samulcottah Canal 
Coconada Canal 
Bank Canal 
Coringa Canal 
Injoram Canal 
Mundapetu Canal 

Central Delta. 

Main Canal 
Gunnaram Canal 
Bank Canal 
Amalapur Canal 
Bendamurlunka Canal 
Bellakumi Canal 
Vilsa Main Canal 
Kadally Canal 



Length 
miles. 
4 
.. 34 

■• '2 

.. 38 
84 
zz 

.. Z3 



8 
44 
4« 
3a 
14 
4 
7 
7 



IVestem Delta. Length 

miles. 

Kain Canal . . . . 6 

Kakampurru Canal . . . . xo 

Narsapur Canal . . . . 39 

Bank Canal . . . . 35 

Mukkamala Canal . . . . 2 

Gostanaddi and Velpur Canal . . 38 

Ellore Canal . . . . 40 

Junction Canal . . . . 3 

Venkiah and Weyem Canal . . 09 

Undi Canal .. .. Z5 

Attili Canal .. •• >5 

Total .. 510 

KisTNA Delta System. 



Eastern Delta, 



Main Canal 
Ellore Canal 



9 
40 



Kistna Delta System, — Contd. 

Eastern Delta. 



Budameru Canal 
Masulipatam Canal . . 
Pulleni Canal 
Pamurru Canal (Junction) 
Buntumilly Canal . . 
Poh-azkodu Canal .. 

IVestem Delteu 

Main Canal 
Nizampatam Canal . . 
Bank Canal 
Commamur Canal . . 

Total 

Grand Total miles 



37 



14 
16 



«3 
27 
45 
50 

^^ 

836^ 



Climate and Sanataria. 

From the physical features of the country the climate is necessarily very varied. 
The arid plains of the east coast, with the thermometer occasionally rising to 115' in 
the shade, form during a greater portion of the year, a striking contrast to the green 
valleys of Malabar and Canara on the west, where the maximum heat is below 90*. The 
moisture brought up by the south-west monsoon being condensed by the Western Ghats, 
the average rainfall between that range of hills and the western coast is over 120 inches, 
most of which falls between the beginning of June and the end of August. A consider- 
able portion of rain finds its way over the ghats to the central districts, while even those 
districts on the eastern coast, where river irrigation prevails, reap the benefit of this 
monsoon in the increased volume of water from the slopes of the Western Ghats. The 
north-east monsoon sets in about the end of September, and during its continuance the 
average rainfall does not exceed 30 inches. Previous to the rains, the country in the 
eastern and central districts is everywhere parched, and life is endured with difficulty. 
Along the coasts, the sea breezes which set in shortly after noon almost throughout the 
year, do much to moderate the temperature. The table-land or undulating surface on 
the summits of the Nilgiris and Palnis, having an elevation of from 5,000 to 7,000 feet 
enjoys the mild climate of the finest part of the temperate zone. The temperature on 
the Nilgiris varies much less from north to south than from east to west. Mists and heavy 
fogs are not unfrequent in the rainy season, and the eastern side is less moist than 



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The Madras Presidency,— Coniinued. 131 

the western. From the end of October to May, a sky clear and nearly cloudless is the 
rule; September and October are pretty irregular in the quantity of rain they bring. In the 
upper ranges of the Annamalle hills, which attain an elevation equal to that of the 
Nilgiris in general, the temperature is much the same as in Ootacamund. The rains 
here for six months of the year are very heavy, and it is doubtful whether the climate 
during these six months is at all suitable for the residence of Europeans. The climate 
is greatly influenced by the monsoons, — periodical winds produced by the unequal 
heating of the continent during certain seasons of the year,— the regular alternation 
of which is most remarkable, the transition from one to the other being usually marked 
by great atmospheric disturbance. 

Ootacamund is the sanitarium of the Presidency on the Nilgiris, but another has 
been formed on the Palnis. Other stations on the Nilgiris are Attara Malle, 4,500 feet, 
Dodabetta, 8,640 feet, Jakunari, about 5,000 feet, Coonoor, 5,760 feet, and Kotagiri, 6,100 
feet The state of Soondoor contains a very important hill sanitarium for Europeans 
in the plateau of Ramandroog, which has been chiefly utilised as a convalescent dep6t 
for the troops serving in the Ceded Districts. It is distant from Bellary thirty-eight 
nfiiles and from Secundrabad 270 miles, and stands 1,825 feet above Bellary, and 1,200 
feet above the surrounding plains. The length of the plateau from north to south is a 
mile and a half, with a varying breadth of from half to three quarters of a mile. 

Staples and Manufactures. 

The chief staples of the Presidency are rice, maize, wheat, millet, ragi and the 
pulses amongst food grains ; oil-seeds, indigo, tobacco, sugar-cane, chillies, pepper, yams, 
plaintains and betel-leaf amongst garden crops, and as a special crop, cotton has a large 
cultivation. The trees most grown for their fruits are cocoanut, arecanut, jack, tamarind 
and mango. Cocoanut palms flourish most luxuriantly on the banks of the estuaries 
and back waters of the western districts of Malabar and Canara. The most valuable 
product of the Presidency is ship timber, abounding in the forests of Malabar, Canara 
and Travancore, as well as in the forests of the Eastern Ghats, principally Teak. 
Sandalwood, supplied to the Chinese market, is also obtained from the forests of Malabar 
and Coorg. Coffee has been very extensively cultivated and is now an important crop. 
The principal coffee tracts of southern India lie along the western coast, and coffee 
estates extend in nearly an unbroken line along the summits and slopes of the Western 
Ghats, from the northern limits of Mysore down to Cape Comorin, in the Nilgiris, 
the Shervaroy and Palni hills and in several districts of the Presidency. Tea cultivation 
has not the same interest in southern India as coffee cultivation, and there are few 
plantations except on the Nilgiris. Tobacco is grown more or less throughout the 
Presidency, with the exception of Malabar and the hill ranges, but the chief localities 
of production are the alluvial lands of the Godavari district, where is grown the well- 
known Lunka tobacco (so named from the Lunkas or river islands on which it is culti- 
vated), and the Coimbatore and Madura districts. Chincona is also grown on the Nilgiris, 
and there are now six plantations for the supply of this febrifuge. 

The mineral wealth of the Presidency is considerable. Gold is known to exist in 
the Wynad and Nilgiris, and the attention of capitalists has been lately drawn to these 
auriferous tracts. Iron ore occurs in several parts in abundance, and extensive found- 
ries have been established in Beypore and South Arcot. Manganese exists in Mysore, 
the Nilgiris and Bellary. Antimony and silver, copper and lead ore in the districts of 



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132 The Madras Presidency, — Continued. 

Madura, Cuddapah, Kurnool and Nellore, also in Mysore. ^Diamonds of moderate value 
and garnets in abundance are met with in the Cuddapah, Kurnool, Godavari and Viza- 
gapatam districts, and coal is found on the banks of the Godavari near Chinnore. 

The usual manufactures are sugar, indigo, pottery, carpets, hardware, cutlery, 
saddlery, cheroots, working in metals, filagree and basket work, and the weaving of silk 
and cotton cloths and coarse woollens. 

The Pearl and Chank or Conch-shell fisheries, carried on entirely under Govern- 
ment management, are at present in charge of the Master Attendant of Tuticorin. The 
gross receipts from these fisheries in 1877-78, were Rs. 31,267, the expenses were 
Rs. 8,363, leaving a net profit of Rs. 22,904. 

Form of Administration. 

The administration of the Madras Presidency is vested in a Governor with a 
Council of three Members. For administrative purposes the Presidency is divided into 
twenty-one Districts, each of which is placed under the charge of a Collector and Magistrate, 
all being subject to the direct control of a Board of Revenue composed of three Mem- 
bers. In the district of the Nilgiris, the principal administrative officer is termed the 
Commissioner of the Nilgiris. Each district is again sub-divided into Taluks^ the 
general superintendence of which is distributed among the Assistants to the Collector, 
a special local revenue and magisterial head, called a Tahsildar^ being in charge of each 
Taluk, and in larger Taluks the Tahsildar being aided by one or more Deputy Tahsildars 
and Sub-Magistrates. The administration of civil and criminal justice is under the 
superintendence of a High Court, assisted by District Judges and Subordinate Judges, 
the latter are usually natives. 

Census. 

The first Census of the Presidency was taken in 1822, when the population was 
returned at 13,476,923. Fourteen years after, or in 1836-37, a second census was taken, 
when the numbers returned were 13,967,395, showing an increase of only 490,472. The 
first of the quinquennial enumerations was taken in 1851-52, when the population was 
found to have risen to 22,031,697, or an increase of 58 per cent in 15 years. Other 
,, „ ^ quinquennial enumerations in succession showed the numbers 

Years 1851-52, .. 82,031,697 ^ 7 . . • rr^v 1 . .1 .. 

„ 1856-57, .. 22,857,855 as given m the margin. The last census taken was on the 

" '!^li'' " "4,656,509 icth November 1871, the resulting figures showed the popula- 
„ 1866.67, .. 26,539,052 ^P ^ ^ o u • • c ^ 

tion to be 31,281,177, being a gross increase of 4,742,125 over 

the figures of 1866-67, giving an average density of 226 persons to the square mile 

for the whole presidency. The sexes are almost equally divided, the proportion being 

ninety-nine females to every one hundred males. 

* The far famed Golcondah, a fortress seven miles to the north-west of Hyderabad, the capital "of the Nizam's dominions, 
is proverbially fomous for its diamonds, yet it has obtained this fame vicariously, for the diamonds which are cut and polished 
at Golcondah, are usually brought thither for that purpose from Partial, dose to the southern frontier of the Nizam's country, 
and about sixteen miles south-west of Ellore in the Ganjam district. But there are other places in the same locality where 
diamonds are or have been found : the names of these places are Mallavelli, Alkur, Parthenipadu, Pratalli, Wastapille and 
Kedavetti Kail. The hills here are a continuation of the sandstone range which extends east from Banganapilli, KondapilU 
and Mallavelli, in all of which localities the matrix of the diamond is a conglomerate sandstone. From this locality the 
world has been supplied for centuries with diamonds of the purest water. The Pitt diamond, weighing in its cut state 136^ 
carats ; the Kohinoor or Mountain of Light, and others were found here, and there is fair reason to suppose that the wealth of 
the Partial region has not been exhau:ited, and that the appliances of modem machinery, directed by men of science, may bring 
to light other gems that have not been discovered by rude native processes of search. 



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1 34 Mysore, — Continued. 

BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

Area, Position, Boundaries, &c. 
The Province or State of Mysore occupies a position physically well defined in 
the south of India. It is a table-land, situated in the angle where the Eastern and the 
Western Ghat ranges converge into the group of the Nilgiri Hills, and lying between 
ii'* 38' and 15° 2' North Latitude, and 74' 43' and 78° 37' East Longitude. Its 
extreme breadth from east to west is about 290 miles, and extreme length from 
north to south about 230 miles. It is bounded on the north by the Bombay Col- 
lectorate of Dharwar and the Madras Collectorate of Bellary ; on the south and east by 
the districts of Malabar, Salem, Coimbatore, Bellary, Cuddapah and North Arcot of the 
Madras Presidency, and on the west by the small province of Coorg, the South Canara 
Collectorate of the Madras Presidency and the North Canara district of the Bombay 
Presidency. On the west the frontier of the state approaches at one part to within ten 
miles of the sea, but in general preserves a distance of from thirty to fifty miles from the 
coast: on the east the nearest point is not less than 120 miles. The southern extremity 
is about 250 miles from Cape Comorin. The area of the province from the latest 
information, is estimated at 27,081 square miles, and this estimate will continue to be 
accepted for statistical purposes, until a more accurate computation is arrived at by the 
Topographical surveys now being carried on in the province. 

Topography, &c. 

That portion of the Mysore province which is above the ghats is often called the table- 
land, but this denomination does not accurately represent the character of the country, 
which is everywhere undulating, and almost entirely free from the level tracts which 
characterise the greater part of Upper India. One striking physical feature of Mysore, 
consists in the huge piles of rocks known as Drugs, rising abruptly in many parts to * 
1,500 feet above the plateau, some solitary, others clustered, and which are everywhere 
visible ; most of them have been fortified from time immemorial, rendering them well nigh 
impregnable strong-holds with the advantage of an unfailing supply of water at the summit 
The Eastern Ghats form the frontier on the east, separating Mysore from the British pro- 
vinces in the Camatic. In many parts the ascent over them into Mysore is steep, while 
in others it is an easy gradient. The country rises gradually from these ghats towards 
Bangalore, which is situated in the most elevated portion of the Mysore plateau, and 
about 3,062 feet above sea level. On the north-west, beyond the Chitaldroog range of 
hills, there is a gradual fall through the broad valley which leads to the Tungabadhra 
river, near the vilage of Harihar, the altitude of which above the sea is only about 1,800 
feet To the south-west, by Seringapatam and Hassan, there is a more marked descent, 
abruptly terminated by the western range of ghats, comprising in this direction the Nilgiri 
and Coorg hills, and further north the Manjarabad and Nagar ranges, known as the 
* Malnad' or hill country, the chief peaks of which are loftier than those of the eastern hills. 
The loftiest elevations in Mysore, on the east, are Sivaganga, about 30 miles from Bangalore, 
reaching a height of 4,559 feet above the sea level; and Nundydroog, thirty-six miles 
from Bangalore, 4,810 feet above sea level, from whence the river Penner takes its rise; 
and the peaks of the Bellakalrangam hills in the Ashtagram division, varying in elevation 
from four, to five thousand feet These hills are clothed with rank vegetation, and un- 
inhabited save by a rude tribe known as Soligars ; on the west, Kuduremukha in the 
Nagar division, 6,215 feet, is one of the highest peaks in Mysore and a remarkable land- 
mark visible from the sea, as well as from above and below the Ghats ; and, the Baba 



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Mysore, — Continued. 135 

Budan mountains in the Nagar division, named from a Mahomedan saint, whose tomb 
is on one of the peaks at an elevation of 6214 feet, the highest point on this range being 
Mulainagiri 6,317 feet These hills are inhabited and contain several coffee plantations, 
some of which are probably the oldest in Mysore. 

The principal rivers in Mysore are the Tunga and the Bhadra rising in the north-west 
of the province ; uniting tfiey form the Tungdbhadra which flows northwards and east- 
wards till it joins the Krishna below Kurnool ; its banks are too high for irrigation pur- 
poses. The Cauvery^ rising in Coorg, passes through the province in a south-easterly 
direction, receiving the Hemavati^ the Sokapavani the Shamsha and the Arkavati from 
the north, and the Lakshmantirtha and the Kapini from the south ; the Cauvery and its 
tributaries supply numerous irrigation channels and tanks, their courses through the 
province being marked by a green fringe of cultivation. The Vedavati, rising near the 
Baba Budan hills, flowing due north and joining the Tungabhadra ; the Fennery the Paler 
and Pannair which rise in the eastern part of the province. The waters of these rivers 
are detained and converted into chains of tanks, but they become large rivers before 
reaching the sea. Owing to their rocky or shallow beds, none of the above rivers are 
navigable, and most are fordable during the dry months. There are no natural lakes in 
Mysore, but there are nearly 38,000 artificial reservoirs or tanks, some of which are of 
considerable magnitude. The largest is the Sulikere tank in the Shimoga district, 40 
miles in circumference. 

The principal forests are found clothing the sides of the western mountains, they 
abound in teak, blackwood and other valuable kinds of timber. There are good roads 
throughout the province, and a branch of the Madras Railway, 84 J^ miles long, reaches 
Bangalore; the extension to Mysore, from Bangalore, called the "Mysore State Railway" 
is now in course of completion. 

Climate. 
The climate of Mysore is sensibly affected by its considerable elevation above the 
sea. It is temperate but not so healthy as might be expected, owing to the prevalence of 
fever in many localities. The year may be divided into three seasons, the hot, the rainy 
and the cold. In the hot season the thermometer ranges from 69* to 90' in the shade, 
and in the cold season from 50° to 77'. The nights are seldom hot, the mornings and 
evenings are always cool if not cold, and the air is very elastic The cold season is 
generally free from rain and lasts till the end of February. The rain in April and May 
is generally very heavy, often filling the tanks in a few hours. The province is favored by 
two monsoons, the south-west and the north-east, the former commencing at the beginning 
of June and closing about the end of August. The north-east monsoon sets in at the 
beginning of October and generally ceases about the middle of November. The rain is 
more continuous than heavy throughout the greater part of the country, but in the tracts 
verging upon the Western Ghats it is unintermitting and puts a stop to all traffic. The 
annual rainfall of these regions is nearly five times that of the rest of the country, the 
quantity diminishing rapidly as the distance from the Ghats increases. The close of the 
rainy season in November is marked by dense fogs which prevail all over the country 
during December and January. Electric storms are common and excessively violent. 

Staples and Manufactures. 
The crops chiefly grown in Mysore are rice, ragi, millets, gram, wheat, sugar-cane, 
oilseeds, cotton, opium, betel, cocoanut and tobacco. Coffee is extensively cultivated, and 



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1 36 Mysore, — Continued. 

the cultivation of this berry now takes rank as one of the most important industries of 
the country. Lac, gums, pepper and resin are also produced, and sandalwood grows 
spontaneously throughout the province. Many of the fruits and vegetables of Europe 
are also successfully cultivated. 

The trade of the country being difficult to develope, owing to its land-locked posi- 
tion, the mountain barriers which separate it from the surrounding countries on three 
sides, and the want of navigable rivers, the manufactures are on a small scale and mostly 
carried on to supply native consumption. Gold dust is found, but there is no metal except 
iron in any degree of abundance. Garnets are frequently to be met with and kankar, or 
calcareous concrete for road making, exists in considerable quantities between Bangalore 
and Seringapatam. Common salt and carbonate of soda impregnate the soil in many 
places, and are extracted for domestic or manufacturing purposes. 

Form of Administration. 
In 1831-32 in consequence of the misgovemment of the then ruling prince, the 
Government of India assumed the direct administration of the affairs of Mysore, and 
first appointed two Joint Commissioners in whose hands the Government of the province 
was vested. In 1834 a single officer was nominated as sole Commissioner in supercession 
of the Joint Commissioners, and to whom, in 1843, ^^^^ ^so delegated the duties of 
Resident, that office as a separate post being abolished. In 1862 the administration was 
re-organised on the model of the Punjab system, and a great number of reforms were insti- 
tuted, all tending towards the introduction of the regulation system. The province was 
divided into three divisions and eight districts, each division being placed under a 
Superintendent and each district under a Deputy Superintendent, aided by Assistant 
Superintendents for the several Taluks into which the districts were sub-divided, and 
corresponding with Tahsils in northern India, the average area of each Taluk being 
about 333 square miles. These Taluks were again sub-divided into Hoblis^ each of 
which was placed under the revenue charge of a native officer styled Shekdar, they 
number 500. In 1869 the title of Commissioner was changed into thatof Chief Commis- 
sioner, by whom the Government of the province is now administered, and in 1873, the 
designations of Superintendent, Deputy and Assistant Superintendents were changed into 
those of Commissioner, Deputy and Assistant Commissioners, respectively. Judicial 
Assistants were also appointed to each district for the disposal of civil suits. 

Census. 
The first general census of Mysore was taken in 1840-41 and the next in 1851-52, 
since which periods annual returns were made up until a general census of the province 
was again taken in November 1871, which last is regarded as fairly reliable; according to 
it the total population of the province was 5,055,412 souls, 2,535,924 being males, and 
2,519,488 females. Of the total population the agricultural classes are in the proportion 
of one-fourth, the non-agricultural three-fourths. 



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Coorg. 



^37 



No. 



Taluks. 



Mercara 
Padinalknad 
Yedenalknad 
Kiggatnad .. 
Nanjarajpatna .. 
Yelsavirshime 



Total 



Area. 



Sq. Ms. 

47a 
3«3 
504 
33« 
"5 
a.ooo* 



Popola- 



33,132 
3a,3So 
31,104 
»7.738 
26.159 
i8,8a9 
168,31a 



Per 
square 
mile. 



lax 
69 
99 
55 
79 

164 



84 



Revenue. 



Rs. 



I 







Lat. 


Long. 




Chief Towns. 


1 


N. 


E. 


1 




to nearest 




& 


minute. 


X 
Ft. 










Meixara 


8,146 


12*25' 


75-47' 


3.809 


Fraserpet 


1.832 


12 28 


76 a 


3,aoo 


Virajendrapet 


3,413 


12 13 


7551 


3,400 


Somwarpet .. 


1,309 


i»37 


75 55 




Napoklu .. 


4.089 


X2 19 


75 45 




Hudikeri .. 


747 


la 6 


76 1 




Sanivarsante.. 


663 


"44 


75 57 


•• 



p 

n 



*A^<^/r.— The following are the areas of the several Taluks as furnished by the Superintendent of the Coorg Revenue Survey. 
Mercara 216 square miles. Padinalknad 367 square miles. Yedenalknad aoi square miles. Kiggatnad 403 square miles. 
Nanjarajpatna 261 square milen. Yelsavirshime 91 square miles. 

In the Census Report and subsequent official documents, the area has been assumed as a,ooo square miles, on what 
grounds is not known. Lieutenant Connor's Survey of 1817, gave an area for Coorg at that time of 2,165 square miles, or 1,585 
above the Ghats and 580 below, but the latter districts on the conquest of the country in 1834, were annexed to South Canara 
or the Tulu country. 





Other Principal Places with 


Population, 




Mercara, 




Yedenalknad. 




Nanjarajpatna. 




Karanagere 


•• i,5a7 










Katigere.. 


.. 1.215 


Ammati .. 


«,4i7 


Hebbale 


. 1,874 


Made .. 


.. 2,719 


Aramare.. 


. 1,073 


MulusQge 
Sirangala 


• 1,83a 






Channaiyankote 


. 1,229 


• 1,473 


PadinmlkmuL 




Karumad 
Ketamalur 


1,163 
. 1,510 


Tarinuru 


. i,o8a 


Kolakere 


.. 1,164 






Yetsavinhime. 




Kumbala 


.. 1,128 


Kitgatnad, 








Nelabe .. 


.. 1,356 










Yevakapadi 


.. 1,324 


Badaga .. 


1,236 


Kodlipet 


• 1.345 



BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

What Wales is to England, Coorg is to Mysore in miniature, and though governed by 
the same Chief Commissioner, the province is British territory and forms no part of 
Mysore. Coorg occupies the summits and eastern slopes of the Western Ghats, within 
the d^ees of North Latitude ii' 55' and 12° 50,' and East Longitude 75° 25' and 76" 
14,' and has an area, of 2,000* square miles; its greatest length from north to south 
being sixty, and from west to east forty miles. Coorg is bounded on the north by the 
Netravati, Kumaradhari and Hemavati rivers, which separate it from the southern taluks 
of South Canara and the Manjarabad taluk of the Mysore district ; on the south 
the province is bounded by the Brahmagiri mountains which divide it from the Wainad 
taluk of the Malabar distict ; on the west, by the South Canara and Malabar districts 
of Madras, and on the east by the Mysore and Hassan districts of the province of 
Mysore, the river Cauvery marking for some distance a portion of the eastern 
boundary. A narrow arm about twelve miles long, by about six wide, projects north- 
wards into Mysore on the north-east. The greater part of the western frontier is from 
twenty to thirty miles from the sea. The name Coorg has been anglicised from the native 
names " Kudagu" or " Kodumale," signifying " mountainous country" or " steep 
mountains." 



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1 38 Coorg, — Continued. 

In physical features the province of Coorg differs greatly from most of the surround- 
ing districts, owing to the mountainous and wooded character of the country. It is a 
constant succession of steep ridges and deep ravines, the whole clothed with forest more 
or less dense, very dense on the eastward towards Mysore, where it k almost wholly un- 
inhabited Advancing westward the forests decrease, leaving Kiggatnad comparatively 
open, and Yelsavirshime a champaign tract The Western Ghats running north and 
south, with an elevation of from 5,000 to 6,000 feet, divide the territory into two unequal 
portions. On the southern limits the Brahmagiri or Marenad ^-ange of hills, running in a 
direction from east to west, constitutes a formidable natural barrier between Coorg and 
Wainad, a sub-division of the Malabar district, with a general elevation of 4,500 
feet, the highest peaks Joeing Davasi-betta, Hanuman-betta, Kadanga-male and Peru-male. 
The table-land upon which Mercara or Madakere is situated, has an average altitude 
of 3,500 feet, and is crossed in all directions by minor hills and ridges, being bounded 
on the west by the Ghats, which culminate near the Bisilu Pass in the Pushpagiri 
hill, 5,626 , feet above sea level, the summit of which commands an extensive 
prospect over Coorg, Canara and Mysore. Other detached hills and ridges, though 
numerous, are not deserving of any particular notice. Some few detached ranges 
are situated along the eastern boundary, not however remarkable for either elevation or 
extent, amongst them the peaks of Siddesvar and Maukal-betta are the most prominent, 
the former guards the pass that gives entrance to Coorg. Near Mercara the hills are closer 
together and more abrupt, and the ravines deeper and more wild. Towards Fraserpet the 
country assumes the champaign character of the Mysore plateau, with scattered solitary hills- 
South of Mercara the country is open with beautiful grassy downs. The general declivity 
is to the north-east and east, as indicated by the Cauvery and its tributaries flowing in 
that direction and receiving the drainage of nearly four-fifths of the country. 

None of the rivers of Coorg are considerable as to breadth or depth, and the inequali- 
ties of the country through which they shape their course, render them unfit for naviga- 
tion or for use in irrigation. The principal rivers, rising in Coorg, are the Cauvery* 
Lakshmantuth, Sumavati, Hemavati, Barapole and NujikaL The Barapole is navigable 
from the sea to within sixteen miles off the foot of the Ghats. The Cauvery rises in the 
Brahmagiri range, at a place called Tale Kaveri, where there are temples of great repute 
among the Hindus, which are yearly resorted to by thousands of pilgrims from the adjoining 
countries, the river being considered the holiest in India, the Ganges not excepted Near 
Fraserpet this river during the monsoons rises to a height of from twenty to thirty feet 
All the mountain streams form cascades of great beauty in their courses through the hills, 
especially the Jessy fall near Mercara. 

The climate of Coorg is temperate and humid The rainfall during the last thirteen 
years, has averaged 123 inches in the year. Of late years the denudation of forests and 
the natural decay of the bamboo, have had the effect of rendering the rainfall less 
regular and heavy. In May, the hottest month, the thermometer has never been known 
to exceed 86°, and the mean temperature in that month is 70°. In September, which 
is the coldest month, the mean temperature is 64*, the average temperature throughout 
the year is 66 J4*. The hot season commences in February and continues till the dose o^ 
May, succeeded by the rainy season, when the south-west monsoon sets in and prevails 
from June to September. The climate, in spite of its excessive humidity; is on the 
whole salubrious, except in the valleys where fever greatly prevails; it is a remarkable feet, 
however, that it appears to be decidedly inimical to the cure of cuts, wounds and sores, 
which are often totally unmanageable without change of air. 



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Coorg, — Continued. 1 39 

Rice is the chief staple of Coorg. The cultivation of cardamoms is next in im- 
portance to that of rice. Coffee and sugar-cane are extensively produced, and tea, 
chinchona, cotton and tobacco are also grown to a small extent English fruits and vege- 
tables are satisfactorily grown, and the Coorg oranges are celebrated. The cardamom is 
indigenous to certain forests in Coorg called maUs^ situated on the line of the ghats 
at an elevation of from 2,500 to 5,000 feet above sea level. The cultivation of this 
plant is to a great number of Coorgs next in importance to that of rice, and the posses- 
sion of a fine cardamom jungle is regarded as a mine of wealth. The gardens come into 
bearing in October and September of the fourth year, and continue to give good crops for 
seven years, when they begin to decline. The plant can be easily grown from seed, and a 
garden of 500 square yards will on an average yield i3fl>s. weight of good cardamoms. 
Coffee is also a staple commodity of Coorg, and to it the province owes much of its pros- 
perity. The plant k propagated by cuttings, but is usually grown from seed, which is put 
down in March or April, the maiden crop being given generally in the third year; an acre 
of land yields on an average six to eight cwts. of coffee, and an estate in good order should 
give a return of 50 per cent on the outlay. There are no mines in Coorg and the whole 
of the metal in use is imported Manufacturing industry has made little or no progress 
amongst the population, and almost every article in use in the country has in conse- 
quence to be imported. 

At present Coorg is administered by the Chief-Commissioner of Mysore, residing at 
Bangalore, who is in direct subordination to the Government of India. The Superintendent 
of Coorg, an officer of the Mysore Commission, is the chief local authority, exercising 
civil, criminal and revenue powers vrithin its limits, under subordination to the Chief- 
Commissioner. For administrative purposes the province is divided into six taluksy each 
in charge of a Sub-Magistrate, called a Subhedar, The taluks are again sub-divided 
into twenty-four nads containing on an average about 67 square miles each. In north 
Coorg the nads, or as they are called Hoblis^ are much smaller and more thickly popu- 
lated. Each Nad or Hobli is in charge of a Parpaitegar^ vested with subordinate 
magisterial powers. Coorg is a non-regulation province. 

The only assemblages of dwellings which can with any propriety be denominated 
towns, are Mercara the capital and a military station, the native portion of the town being 
known as Mahadevapet ; Fraserpet, the monsoon head-quarters of the Superintendent, 
and a town of small extent, situated on the eastern frontier and at the foot of the hills 
on which Mercara stands ; Virajendrapet and Somwarpet The dwellings of the Coorgs 
in the country generally are isolated,and it is only here and there that the eye can detect 
the thatched houses of the inhabitants betrayed by solitary wreaths of smoke. 

A previous computation showed the population to be 113,689, the last census taken 
in November 187 1, gave the number of inhabitants at 168,312, showing an increase of 
about 48 per cent, the males numbering 94,4S4> the females 73*^5^ 



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TriMfA by W. Newmwi Jfc Co.. Caloutu 



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IV. 



THE BOMBAY PRESIDENCY: 

Comprising 4 Divisions or Commissionerships, embracing 24 Districts, 

WITH THE 

NATIVE STATES ATTACHED THERETO. 

Under a Governor. 



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142 



The Bombay Government 

Geographical Area of the Territories under the Civil and Political control of the 
Governor of Bombay^ 1877-78, 



Principal Geographical Divisions. 


Area. 


British Possessions directly Administered— 


Square Miles. 


Northern Division 


15,553 


Central Division 


38,563 


Southern Division 


22,846 


Sind Division ... 


48,876 


Aden 


II 


Total ... 


125,849 


Tributary States— 




Gujarat 


42,079 


Konkan 




Deccan 


3,^88 


Western Karnatic 


2,594 


Sind 




Total 


47,961 


Non-Tributary States— 




Gujarat 


4,476 


Konkan 


1,763 


Deccan 


7,791 


Western Karnatic 


210 


Sind 

1 


6,109 


Total 


20,349 


Grand Total ... 


194,159 



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< -n 


1 






Q 








2 


Q 










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Digitized by 



Google 



148 



The Bombay Presidency, — Continued. 



List of the Native Tributary and Feudatory States and Chief ships embraced within the 

Bombay Presidency y under control of tht several Political Officers or Agents Subordinate 

to His Excellency the Go7*ernor of Bombay, 





Agbkcies, States 


1 Estimated. 


Position 




FORCES. |^:i^«- 




>\ 


6 

^ AND 








of Tribute. 


.1 t 


« 1 of Capital to 


'=1 


Chiefships. 


lArea. 


Popln. 


Revenue. 


Chief. 1 


l\ J 


S t nearest mi- *S '<"2 
c 1 nute. ' **» 1 5 










! U 


- 1 ""'^'=- • X . X 


X 


North Gujarat States. 


1 
Sq.Ms 

1 

' 4.500 


2,100,000 


R$. 

130,00,000 Gaikhwar 


1 
Rs. , 

3016,272 


1 1 ' 


Baroda 


10,70022* 18 '73* 15' 


185 ii 


•2 Cutch, capital Bhuj, a4,>xj |l 6,500 


500,00- 


24,00,000 

1 


Maharana 


1,86,950 III 172 


3,740 23 15 69 49 


.. a 


3 


Palanpur Superinienftency. '■ 










1 




I 




I. Palanpur, Popn.Tn.17,200 3i»5o 


ai5,9i7 


1 4,55,800 


Diwan 




16] 294 


69724 12,72 28, .. 




2. Radhanpur ,, 13.300 1,150 


91,600 


1,00,000 


Nawab 




2, 248 


362,23 50 71 38 






3-Chadchat ) ..440 
4. Sanlalpur \ .. »* 


»8,i93 


35,000 


Thakur 








1 






6.Tharad \ „ 2,500 ^40 


5».ios 


75,000 


do. 






{•so 


•• 24 4 ;7> «5 

3024 26 71 40 


3 




7. Suigam ,, 9,500 220 


10,104 


I2,000 


do. 








.. |24 11 


71 22 1 .. , §• 




8. Tervada 


125 


7,338 


12,000 


Malik 






80 


50, »4 4 


71 42 .. ' § 




9. Diodar 


440 


19,700 


25,000 


Thakur 










24 9 


7< 47 




& 




icVarahi 


330 


30,0-96 


40,000 


Malik 










23 49 


71 26 






II. Vav „ 3,100 


3B0 


23,080 


30,000 


Rana 






30 


20 


24 24 


7> 33 








12. Bhabhar 


80 


5,660 


3,500 


Thakur 








.. 


24 6 


71 35 








13. Kankrej 


Sao 


37,770 


40,000 


do. 


.... 




•• 












4 


Mahikanta Agency, 


4,000 


447.000 


7,91,700 


















i 




I. Idar & Ahmednagar 6,000 


2,SOO 


217,380 


6,62,670 


Maharaja 


.... 


«7 


968 


1,000 


23 50 


73 3 




A 



Minor ChUfs of Mahikanta, 



Names. 



X. Amaliyara 
a. Arasur 

3. Bhalusana 

4. Bhilara 

5. Bakrol 

6. Bolandra 

7. Bawisi 

8. Chandami 

9. Choriwad 

10. Dabha 

11. Dadhaliya 

12. Danta 

13. Dhanal 

14. Da wad 

15. Desan 

16. Dabhora 

17. Derol 

x8. Dedhrota 
19. Ghodasar 

30. Ghadgoara 

31. Ganthiol 

22. Ghoradar 

23. Harol 

24. Hansaleshwar 

25. Hapa 

26. llol 

27. Isri 

28. Thadar 

29. Katosan 

30. Kbadal 



647 
38,480 



4,025. 



2,900 

1,550 3,000 
5,500 15.640 



4.500 
2,800 



Names. 



Khedbramba 

Kukria 

Karma bai 

Karoli 

Kherwara 

Likhi 

Mandheti 

Medhasan 

Manoa 

Mansa 

Madarsa 

Malpur 

Magodi 

Mohanpur 

Meghraj 

Mahial 

Mali 

Manorpar 

Nirmali 

Ora 

Posina 

Pethapur 

Pal 

Punadra 

Pol 

Paveshwar 

Phaiki 

Prempur 

Radodra 

Raigarh 



1,400 
1,200 
x,ioo 






I 



Rs. 



2,6oo 

5.500 
',300 



11,893 38, 
11,900 23, 



10,300 
2,700 
14,000 



6,900 
2,800 

4,920 



,000 



,000 
,000 



700 



Thakur 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

Rawal 
Thakur 
,ooo| do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 
,ooo| do. 

do. 
,000 Mian 



I 



Rao 
Thakur 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Names. 



61. Ramas 

62. Ranasan 

63. Rupal 

64. Rani 

65. Ramaleshwar 

66. Sathamba 

67. Sudasna 

68. Sadra 

69. Samlaji 

70. Sanibalpur . 

71. Sabli 

72. Suwar 

73. Songarh 

74. Samaleshwar 

75. Santhal 

76. Sathasna 

77. Taranga 

78. Tintoi 

80. Unoni 

81. Warali 

82. Valasna 

83. Vadagam 

84. Varsoda 

85. Vakupur 
* 86. Vasna 

87. Gubat 

88. Timba 



1,650 
5.330 
3,180 



4,000 
5.40O 



5.365 



3.880 
3.260 



Rs. 

1,500 
8,000 
3,aoo 



6,000 
8,000 



8,050 



2,150 4,500 



4.S00 
10,050 



3,88oj 10,500 
2,350' Sooo 
4,450* 7,000 
1,2501 3,soo 
i,x5<^ 700 



Mian. 
Tbakor. 
da 
da 
da 
do. 
da 
do. 
do. 
do. 
da 
da 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
da 
da 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Digitized by 



Google 



The Bombay Presidency, — Continued. 



149 





AcENCiBs, States 

AND 


ESTIMATSD 


Positioa 
of 


Tribute. 


Forces. 


Lat. 

N. 


Long. 






1 










j; 


g. 


of capital to 




Chibpships. 


Area. 


Poiraln. 


Revenue. 


Chief: 




J 


1 


1 


nearest 
minute. 


» 






S.MS. 




R«. 




Rs. 
















5 


Rewakanta Agency, 


4,79* 


500,000 


16,97,000 
















FC. 






I. RajpipU, Cap. Naadod 
a. ChotaUdepur 


«.574 


zao,ooo 
6a,9oo 


8,00,000 
3,00,000 


Maha£wal 


•• 




xoo 

58 


t 


ji'tr 


t'i 








3. Lunawada 


74,800 


x,a9,ooo 


Maharana. 




15 


43 


aox 


23 9 


11 yi 









4. Sunth 


i?J 


49.675 


90,000 


do. 


7,000 




29 


213 


2313 


7355 




3 




5. Bariya 

C Balasioor.. 


59.400 


1,75,000 


Maharawal. 


ia,ooo 




35 


227 


2244 


73 5« 




n 




189 


4«.ooo 


1,00,000 


JS:^^^^' 


X 1,079 




53 


2ZO 


22 58 


73*4 








7. Kadana .. 


130 


ia,7oo 


15,000 


Thakur. 








., 












8. Saojdi .. 


33 


a,55o 


5,000 


do. 




•• 


•' 




•• 


•• 









Mewof Statei 


ARnt 


ChUjs of ReofaJtMntiU Populaiion 88^80. 










Chibfsrip 


i 


i 


Position of 


1 


CHIBPSHir 


1 


i 


Position of 


OB 


1 






OR 


I 




Estate. 


< 


Chief. 




Estate. 




Chief. 


Sankhira Afcwas. 


SqMs 


Rs. 


• 


Pandu Mewas, 


SqMs 


Rs. 




I Agar 
s Ahnt 


17 


11,500 


Thakur. 


x 


Amrapur 


a 


325 


Khancada. 




5,500 


do. 


9 


Bhadarwm 


27 


38,900 


Rana. 


9 Bhiloria 




9.000 


do. 


3 


Chaliar 


9 


X 0,000 


Rawal. 


4 Bihora 




800 


do. 


4 


Dhari 


3 


2,500 


do. 


5 Cborangla 

6 Churettr 


c6 


3,000 


do. 


1 


Dhamsia 


5 


4.000 


Thakur. 




800 


do. 


Cotardi 


a 


600 


do. 


i ssr 




500 
x,ooo 


do. 
do. 


I 


Itwad 
lesar 


4 
2 


x,ooo 
300 


do. 
do. 


9 Garh 


128 


ao,ooo 


Rana. 


9 


Jumkha 


X 


1,200 


do. 


1^ JiralKamoti 
■ I Sfandwa 




3.400 
35.000 


Thakur. 


10 


Kanoda 


4 


2,200 


do. 


17 


Rana. 


XX 


Kasla Pagina 
LitarGothra 


X 


225 


do. 


12 NalU 




600 


Thakur. 


xa 


X 


330 


do. 


13 Nangam 


3 


9,000 


do. 


»3 


Mewali 


6 


a,9oo 


do. 


14 Naswari 


19 


X2,000 


do. 


Z4 


MokaPaginu 


X 


250 


do. 


E5 Palasni 
z6 Rampura 


za 


5.000 


do. 


:i 


Nahara 


9 


400 


do. 




3.500 


do. 


Pandu 


9 


3,100 


Khanzada. 


17 Rengan 

18 Sindbiapura 




..SS 


do. 


«7 


Pantalaori 


6 


8,000 


Thakur. 




do. 


x8 


Poicha 


3 


2,000 


Rana. 


19 Uchad 


9.000 


do. 


«9 


Rajpur 


X 


250 


Thakur. 


90 Virampura 




700 


do. 


90 


Sanora 


11 


10,000 


Rana. 


«x Wajiria 


ax 


27,000 


do. 


ax 


Sihora 


'^ 


16,000 


do. 


92 Vanmala 


xo 


4,000 


do. 


29 


Umeta 


29,300 


do. 


83 WanwIMal 




X,200 


do. 


93 


Waktapur 


X 


500 


Thakur. 


^iWasanVirpur 
•♦tWasanSerada 


xa 


8,000 
5,000 


do. 
do. 


Derka Mtwas, 








«5 Wohora 




5,000 


do. 


X 


Anghar 


t 


3.400 


do. 


36 Warooli 




300 


do. 


9 


Dorka 


3 


2,200 


do. 


97 Pantlavdi 


5 


2,000 


Khanzada. 


3 


Raeka 


3 


2,700 


do. 


€ 


Kattywar Agmcy 
tsi Class SiaUs. 


aa,ooo ] 


1,884,800 


xo2,aa,ii5o 






















T. Bhannagar 




403,754 


25,68,228 


Rawal. . 


1,30,000 


»7 


550 


a,aoo 


91*46' 


72-xi' 


169 






9. Dhrangadra 




87.949 
■90,847 
380,920 


4,00,000 


Raj Sahcb. 


40,670 


h 


140 


160 


2259 


7x30 








3. Nawanapr 

4. Jnnagarh 




15,02,500 
18,00,000 


Nawab. 


50,3" 
28,324 


% 


1,050 
1,270 


4.080 
3,750 


2227 
2131 


70 7 
7030 


;; 






»nd Clmst StmUt, 




























1. Dhaix)! .. 


d 


x8,3«o 


x,5o,ooo 


Thakur. 


,, 


7 


41 


908 


.. 


,. 


., 






9. Goodal .. 


g 


«37.»«7 


9,87.386 


do. 


50,207 


16 


659 


2155 


70*52 


.. 


i 

■3* 




3. Ja£u«bad.. 

4. Limri 


s 


10,500 


42,000 


Sidi. 




4 


30 


125 


20 52 


71 25 


,. 




•3 


46,000 


3,00,254 


Tliakur. 


44,"8 


3 


32 


84 


2234 


71 SI 


,, 




5. Palitana .. 

6. Morvi ., 


3 


51,256 


3,00,000 
6,50,000 


do. 




2 


50 


50 


21 29 


71 50 


, , 


& 




1 


90,616 


do. 


9,263 


XI 


X09 


1,050 


22 49 


7054 


,, 






7, Wankaner 

8. Wadhwan.. 


a8,7So 


1,25,000 


Raj Saheb. 
Thakur. 


17,422 


2 


^ 


70 


2237 


7059 


,, 






1 


45.430 


3,50,000 


32,488 


3 


IXO 


2243 


7M3 








9. R^jkot .. 


36.770 


1.50,000 


do. 


18,990 


2 


25 


.. 


22 19 


7050 


.. 






3rd Class StaUs, 


























1. Bantwa .. 




b6,oxo 


4,40,840 


Khan. 


99,642 
6,324 


4 


»5 


30 


21 29 


70 7 


,, 






a. Chura 




»3i793 
90,436 


1,25,000 


Thakur. 


X 


25 


t 


2229 


7«44 


,. 






3. Lakhtar .. 




75,000 


do. 


6,763 


i 


35 


2251 


71 50 


,, 






4. Porbandar 




7a.o77 


4,00,000 


Rana. 


21,202 


275 


650 


21 38 


6938 


,, 






5. Sayla 

6. Wala 




16,528 




Thakur. 


15,000 


I 


20 


g 


2233 


7x3* 


,. 








X3,o26 


x.95,000 


do. 


.. 


2 


50 


2X53 


7x55 








7. Jasdan .. 




33,796 


1,50,000 




Chela. 


7.694 


4 


20 




40 


99 


a 


7115 


1 





Digitized by 



Google 



ISO 



The Bombay Presidency,— Continued. 





Agencies, States 

AND 


Estimated. 


Posidoo 
of 


Txibute. 


Forces. 


Lat. 

N. 


Long. 
E. 


1 


'. 

s S 








.^ 


g" 


f, 








of capital 


" 9 
C 9 




Chibfships. 


Area. 


Populn. 


Revenue. 


Chief. 




i 
5 


i 


1 


to nearest 
minute. 


X 


6 


Kattywar Agency^ — 
(Continued.) 

4th Clou States. 
X. Dwarka .. 


SqMs 




Rs. 


Thakor. 


Rs. 








22-X4' 


69- X' 


feet. 


i 




a. Datha 




23,000 


23,000 


do. 




.. 


.. 




21 12 


72 








r. i;r :: :: 


P 


140,000 


10,00,000 


do. 


50.262 




.. 


.. 


21 46 


7040 






5 


17,680 


X, 00,000 


do. 


7.500 


9 


15 


40 


22 38 


7X 30 








5. Bajana .. 


9 


'7.456 


50,000 


do. 


7,980 




»5 


30 


as 7 


7' 49 








6. Lathi 


P 


7.747 


48,750 


do. 




a 


ao 


20 


a»43 


7x26 








7. Malia .. 


xo,ooo 


50,000 


do. 


.. 


3 


«5 


40 


21 9 


70 22 








8. Virpur .. 




6,320 


30,000 


do. 


3,4«8 






•• 


2X 52 


7047 







Uinor Chiefs of Kattywar, {sih, 6th, and ph Classes) or Taiukdars holding separate Jurisdutions, 



Chiefs KIP 

OR 

E^TA'n. 



CHtxrsmp 

OR 

Estate. 



I 



CKiarsHip 

on 
Estate- 



JJkallawad District 

I Ankewalia 
9 Bharejda 

3 Bhoika .. 

4 Bhuthan 

5 Bhulgamra 

6 Bhuowana 

7 Chuchana 
BChulala.. 
9 Bhalala .. 

10 Dussara 
XX Dudhrej 
X2 Dewalia 
X3 Durod .. 
X4 Gedi .. 
X5 Gundiali 
x6 Jakhun . . 
17 Jhampodar 
x8 Jhammar 
X9 Jhinjuwara 
90 iCannar 
9X Kesria .. 

92 Kuntharia 

93 Karol .. 

94 Kamalpur 

95 Khuinblao 

96 Khandia 

97 Khirali .. 
98Laliad .. 
99 Mujppr . . 
30 PulaJi . . 
3x Patri 

32 Rajpur . . 

33 Rai Sankli 

34 Sumla .. 

35 Sahuka . . 

36 Talsana . . 

37 Tavi 
38Untri .. 

39 Wunala . . 

40 Vithalgarh 

41 Warod .. 

42 Wannah 
43Wanod .. 

Kattywar District 
North. 

I Anandpur 
aAkdia .. 

3 Bilri 

4 Bamanbor 



Rs. 

14,860 

13,666 

3. '59 
XX, 830 

5.544 
2,293 
2,300 
9,045 
60,000 
x8,342 

5,23* 
x,x8o 
4,286 

X2,000 

1,573 
4. "4 
4,016 

80,000 
5,117 
1,651 

10,497 
6,185 
9,700 
4,579 
a,945 

xo,6ii 
2,850 

3,225 

4,800 
9.< 

9,000 

7,625 

9.650 

99,922 

9,7x1 

«,955 

9.573 

15,000 

21,000 

22,318 

i2,xo8 



99,11^ 
x,ooo 
3,000 
2,103 



Rs. 

1,300 
94 

1,759 
641 

1,400 
998 
318 
971 
474 

X2,968 

X,I02 

467 
366 

X,200 
1,408 
242 
138 
464 
",073 
X40 
278 

1.491 
703 
776 
730 
806 
678 
362 
603 

357 
5,235 
9,412 
556 
959 
519 
913 
310 
493 
396 

1,252 
3,715 
1,953 



715 

X29 



76 



Kattywar District 
North,— Contd, 

5 Bhimora 
6BhadU .. .. 

7 Babra Chumardi . . 

8 Chotila (Baroda) .. 

9 Chobari . . ^ 

10 DardiTanbai 

11 ItriaGodhala 
i2KotraPita ^ .. 
X3 Kanpur Ishwaria .. 

14 Kariana 

15 Khambala 

6 Mewasa^ 

7 MatraTimba 

18 Nilwala.. 

19 Paliyad . . 

20 Ramparda 

21 Samadhiala (Charan) 

22 Sanosra . . 

23 Sudamra Dhandulpur 

24 Sijakpur 

Kattywar District 
South. 

X Amreli (Baroda) 

9 Bagasra.. 

•3 Bhalgam Baldhoi 

4Charkha 

5 Dholarwa* 

6 Dahira . . 

7 Gigasaran 

8 Garamli Moti 

9 Garamli Nani 
xoGadhia 
IX Halaria.. 
la Kuba ^ .. 
13 Kh^aria 

Kamadhia 

Kaner . . 

Kathrota 

Khijudia Nagani 

Jhainka . . 

Lakhapadar 
^o Manawad 
2x Monwel.. 
32 Randhia 

23 Silana .. 

24 Vichhawad 

25 Vekria . . 
36 Wagwari 
27 Wasawad 



Rs. 



Rs. 



8,133 


307 


16,000 


XjXOI 


40,000 


.. 


91,874 


653 


5,909 


154 


9,500 


.. 


4,000 


95a 


60,000 


4,850 


5,000 


930 


91,000 


8so 


6,ooo 


406 


6,203 


445 


X,20X 


990 


9,450 


511 


40,000 


907 


1,034 


75 


800 




4,030 


186 


90,525 


2,381 


5,325 


316 



10,57,873 

t, 00,000 
9,000 

X9,000 
9,000 

xo,ooo 

5,000 

9,000 
1,500 
9,500 
X 5,000 
3,000 
9,400 
6,500 
2,000 
x,ooo 
x,ooo 
4,000 

3,000 

1,500 
90,000 
9,500 

3,000 
3,500 

4,< 

X,900 
90,000 



X,69I 

904 



766 



HaUar District. 

X Bhadwa.. 
a Drafa .. 

3 Gauridar 

4 Gatka . . ^ 

5 Jalia Diwani 

6 Kotra Naiani^ 

7 Kotra Sangani 

8 Kotharia 

9 Kauksiali 

10 Khirasra 
IT Lodhika 

12 Mulila Deri 
3 Mengni . . 

14 Pal 

15 Rajpura 

16 Mahuwa 

17 Shahpur 

8 Satodar Waori 

9 Sisangchandli 
20 Virwa . . 
2xWadali.. 

Soraih District. 

1 Umrapur 

Gohehoar District. 

1 Alumpur^ 

2 Chamardi 

3 Chitrawao 
4Dhola .. 
5Gadhali.. 

6 Gadhula 

7 Bhogawaddar 
8Katoria.. 

9 Kh^ria .. 
xo Limra . . 

11 Panchaura 

12 Pachegam 

13 Ramanka 

!4 Samadiala Chabaria 
i5 Ratanpur Dhanuuika 

16 Songarh 

17 Toda Todi 

18 Waori Wacbani 

19 Warod . . 
ao Wasri Dharwala 



Rs. 



xx,ooo 
60,000 

13,000 

10,000 

13,000 

600 

60,000 

15,000 
1,200 
19,000 
25,000 
14,000 
ao,ooo 
:o,ooo 

X9,000 

2,000 
6,500 

X2,000 

7,500 

x,ooo 
9,000 



x6,ooo 



4,000 

9,000 

600 

1,500 
9,000 
3,000 
5,000 

9,000 

9,400 

95,000 

1,500 

37,000 

1,500 
6,500 

5,850 

9,000 

3,500 

3,000 
9,200 
10,050 



Rs. 



1,394 
3,706 
1,01 X 

643 



9,077 
948 

9,36^ 

1,987 
1,279 

3.41» 

3,663 

190 

464 

1,466 
790 

346 



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The Bombay Presidency, — Continued. 



J51 



Minor Chiefs of Kattywar^ (jth, 6ih, and ph Classes) or Talukdars holding separate 

Jurisdictions — Continued. 



Chibfship 


, 


. Chibfship 


«; 


£ 


Chibfship 


, 


, 


OR 

Estate. 


& 


1 

^ Estate. 


0$ 




OR 

Estate. 




S 


Und Sarviya Dut. 


Rs. 


^*- Und Satviva Dsit,,— 


Rs. 


Rs. 


Und Saroiya Dist.y— 


Rs, 


Rs. 


X Aiavej .. 
a Bhandaria 


5.900 

4,800 


(Continued.) 






(Continued.) 






loKanjarda 


«,5oo 




iSShiroda.. 


900 




3 Bodanooess 


1,050 


iz Morchopna 


700 




lO Samadrala . . 


8,000 


., 


4 Dedarda 


r^ 


.. 12 Pa 


«?550 




ao Ranigam 


25,566 




sChok .. 


laRaipara 
14 Ronisala 


a»5a5 




at Vejanoness 


490 


,, 


eCandhol 


a,ooo 


3,100 




aaWadal .. 


a.5So 


,, 


TjanjaManaji 
8 Jallia Amr^i 


a,ooo 
2,aoo 


15 Sheodivadur 

16 Satanoncss 


975 
950 




Babriawar District. 






Q unapadar .. 


5SO 




«,70O 




iDedan .. 


30,000 


•' 



Agencies, States 

AND 

Chiefships. 



Estimated. 



Area. 



Populn. 



Revenue. 



Position 

of 
Chief. 



Tribute. 



Forces. 



I 



Long. 
E. 



Of capital 
to nearest 
minute. 



1. 



Kaira Agency. 
(Zambay 

Panch Mahals Agency, 

Narukof 
Capital Jambughora 

South Gujarat States, 

Surat Agency, 

X. Bansda 
3. Dharampor 
3. Sachin 

Nth, Maratha States^ 

Khandesh Agency, 
14. Dttng States 



Amala. 
Avchar. 
Chinchligadad. 
Derbhavti. * 
Gadhi. 

hanGarkhadi. 

^^asurna. 



Palasvihir. 

Pimpladevi, 

Pimpri. 

Shivbara. 

Wadhawan. 

Kirli. 

Surgana. 



6. Mewas Staits 

(niikhli. I Nal. 

GauhalL I Navalpur. 
KathL I Singhpur. 

Nasik Agency, 
Peint 

Thana Agency, 
Jawhar 

Kolaba Agency, 
Janjira 

Superiniendency, 
Sawant Wari . . 



S.M. 




Rs. 


350 


83,494 


4,00,000 


»43 


6.840 


10,500 


240 


32,154 
74,600 
18,06a 


1,86,570 
2,50,000 
i,77,'7o 


2,350 


27,000 


79,600 


»,49o 


9,000 


41,780 


850 


47,040 


56,450 


540 


37.300 


54,600 


150 


72,000 


3,aa,99o 


900 


190,800 


3,04,278 



Nawab. 



Raja. 



Raja. 

do. 
Nawab. 



Bhil Chie6. 



Rs. 

85,475 



7,800 
7,000 



Bhil Chiefs. 

Lapsed. 

R;ga. 

Nawab. 

Sir Desai 

or 
Deshmuk. 



50 

100 

17 



20 45 
20 32 
5 



73 45 



73 a8 
73 17 
72 59 



436 



19 52 



18 18 



5 54 



feet, 
xoi 



73 35 



73 21 



73 52 



H 



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152 



The Bombay Presidency, — Continiud. 








Estimated. 






Forces, 




Lat. 
N. 


[yWgT 




1 




AcEMaES, States 

AND 




PcsitioD 
of 










i ^ 


^1' 


6 
J5 








Tribotc. 




1 


g. 


of capital 


1? 




Chibfships. 


Area. 


Popln. Revenue. 


duet 




i 




•-* 


to nearest 
minntie. 


1 1 


»5 


Satara Agency, 


SqMs 




Rs. 




Rs. 












Feet. 






I. Aundh .. .. 1 


913 


68,355 


1,35,000 


Pant Prid- 

nidhi. 
Pant Sachiv. 


.... 


.. 


•• 


.• 


i7'3i'74*23'| 


•• 






a. Bhor 


i,49» 


136,075 


4,42,900 


5p235 


,, 


., 


,, 


18 9- 


n 54 


.. 


1 




\. Daflapur .. 


40 


8.693 


6,360 
83.640 


Deshmuk. 




.. 


.. 


.. 


«7 75 7 1 




SL 




X lath *^ .. .. i 
5. Phaltan .. 


885 


70^5 


do. 


4,239 


.. 


.. 


.. 


'Z 3 


75 15 


• • 






397 


59,53^ 


1,27,578 


Nimbalkar. 


9,600 


" 


•• 


•• 


x8 


74 29 


•• 




x6 


Sholapur Agency, 
























1 




Akalkot 


500 


87,066 


3,38,500 


Raja. 


14,592 


•• 


•' 


•• 


»7 31 


76 14 


•• 


1 


»7 


A>«/A Maratha Agency. 




























Kolhapur 


3.184 


8oa,69o 


30,47.243 


Mahan^a- 


.►.. 


67 


154 


x,5oo 


.6 4* 


74 16 


.. 






FendatorUi qf Kolkapur. 




























1. Ajra 






.. .. 








.. 




16 8 


74 17 


.. 






3. Amba 




.. .. 






3»420 1 




.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 






%. Baura 


*83 


43»439 


79»'59 


PantAmatya 




.. 


., 


.. 


.. 


.. 




;. Chandelghat 
5. Inchalkaranji 


'^. 


59.330 
47,801 


2,12,235 


Ghorpnray 


aVoci3 




•• 


;; 


k6 41 


74 31 


,, 


\^ 




6. Kaaal 

7. Malkapur .. 


129 


2.t4,377 


Ghatgay 


3,000* 

.... s 




•• 


;: 


16 33 
16 53 


74 «3 
74 1 


•• 


\ 




8. Prabhanwali 


'.! 






.. .. 


.. .. JJ 




,. 




.. 


.. 




^ 




9. Vishal^h.. 


935 


32*414 


x,o9.638 


Pritioidhi 


Sooo^ 




.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 


.. 






xo. Kapshi 




11, 117 


40,919 


Mumalkat 


1,400 >. 






.. 


.. 




.. 






XI. Torgal 


130 


i6,ax3 


S7,5»2 
80,434 


Senakhaskil 


835(2' 




.. 


.. 


15 56 


75 16 


.. 






xa. Datawad .. 




X5i»34 


Amnndomra 


3,050 




•• 


•• 




•• 


•• 






South Maratha States, 




























X. Jamkhandt.. 

3. kurundwad (elder brh) 


493 


xoa,346 


3,86,800 


Sirdar 


20,840 


X 


57 


8«5 


z6 30 


75 ao 


,, 






x8a 


39.420 


x,oo,ooo 


do. 


9.618 


X 


IX 


347 , 


f. 


74 40 
74 42 








3. KunMKlwad(youngerbrh) 

4. Mirai (elder branch) .. 


"4 
340 


30,250 
83,aoo 


x,oa,339 
3,79,463 


do. 
do. 


12,557 


X 

4 


x8 
68 


386 : 

535 . 


x6 50 








S. Mir2 (younger branch) 


ao8 


35.600 


1,59.442 


do. 


6,412 
8,671 


5 


48 


257; 


" 






36a 


58,920 


1,46,475 


do. 


X 


48 


852 


x6 ao 


75 ao 


,. 






7. Ramdurg .. 


140 


38,030 


1,04,044 


do. 




X 


52 


703 


15 58 


75 aa 


.. 






8. Sangli 


896 


333,663 


6,43.300 


do. 


.... 


4 


147 


966 


x6 53 


74 36 


,, 






9. Mhaisal .. 


ax 


2,656 


32,296 


do. 










•• 


•• 


•• 




s8 


Dharwar Agency, 




























X. Savanur 


70 


X7,388 


81,673 


Nawab 


.. .. 




,, 


., 


14 55 


T\ 


,, 


i 




a. Shirhatd .. 




.... 








.. 


.. 


.. 


15 13 


.. 


t 




3. Kundgol .. 


.. 




.. .. 






.. 




,, 


15 IS 


75 18 


.. 


^ 




4. Laxmeshwar 


•• 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


•• 


•• 


•• 


15 7 


75 31 


•• 


A 


«i 


Sind Agency, 
























i 




Khairpur 


6,109 


X3o,ooo 


6,43,734 


Mir 


.... 




•' 


•• 


aj 32 


68 49 


•• 


1 


2< 


Aden SetUement , .. 
alliance 


35 


19,390 
133,300 


19,41,000 
x,s5/)oo 


.... 


.... 






•• 


X2 47 


45 10 


•• 


i 




Socotra Island 


•• 


2,000 


1,000 


Sultan 


.... 




•• 




•• 


•• 





Notes on the above Native States, 

The Dnmcroas aativc stales comprised within the Bombay Presidency, form several distinct grovps, oocumring an esd- 
■ttted area of 73,960 sqtuure miles, or about one-third of the entire area of the Presidency, with a population of about 
8,954,^90 souls, jrielding an estimated revenue of R». 44,596,467. They have been arranged according to their geographical 
positions. The superintendence of Political matters within their respective divisions is vested in three Commissioners, except 
|n the more important states of Kolhapur and Cutch, and those included in the Kattywar Agency, whidi are under Political 
Agents in direct correspondence with the Government. 

The principal northern state occupying the laigest portion of Gujarat, with parts of Khandesh and KAttjrwar, b that of 
Baroda^ now under (during the young Gaikkwof's minority) the direct administration of the Government of India. 

There are four Political Agencies around Baroda, consisting of groups of states, which are or have been more or leas con> 
nected with Baroda by conquest t>r payment of tribute, these are the states of the Palanpur Suptrmttndency^ the Mmkikmmtm^ 
the Rewm k an t a and tlw Kattywar Agtnciu, The geographical posatioa of the three first may be described as being on the 



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The Bombay Presidency,— Conimued. 153 

broken scniM and slopes descending, on the west side, from the Malwa platean to the gulf of Cambay and the Rann of Cntch. 
This wild hill ooontiy connects the Vindliya range with the Aravalii hills, and may be in short called the western rear of the 
'great Bfalwa platean. 

CutcAy (Kackk) or the sea coast land lying between the peninsula of Katt3rwar on the south, and die province of Sind 00 
the north, extends from 20* 47' to 34* o' North Latitude, and 68* a6' to 71* 10' East Longitude. It is a belt of land about x6o miles 
from ea^t to west, and about 70 miles firom north to south, cut off almost endrdy from the continent of India by the Rann on the 
north and east, and by die gulf of Cutch on the south. Its isolated position makes it a nursery of excellent seamen and gives 
its people a distinct nationality. For administrative purposes Cutch is partitioned off into eight sub-divisions, as follows, 
Abdasa with Nakhtarana, 1,525 square miles ; Anjar, 430 square miles ; Bhachan, 475 square miles ; Bhty with Khavda, 1,400 
square miles ; Lakhpat, 810 square miles ; Mandvi, 515 square miles ; Mundra, 390 square miles ; Rapar with Khadir, 965 
square miles. The average annual rainfall at ^uj the ci4>ital, is (burteen inches. The diief minerals of Cutch are coal, iron, 
alum, salt and building stone, and the state has laag been famous for the superior design and workmanship of its gold and 
silverware. 

The Palmn^r group of states, thirteen in number, occupies an area of about 7,775 square mDes, and has a population of 
about 5oa,6oo souls, and a revenue of Rs. 13,28,300. The diief states of this group are Palanpur and Radhanpur. The 
country under this superintecdency lies between 24* 41' and 33* 35' North Latitude, and 71*' z6' and 73* 46' East Longitude. 

The Makikmnta group of states, in the extreme north-east comer of the Bombay Presidency, Ipng between 23* 5^ and 34* 35' 
North Latitude, and 73* 31' and 73* 45' East Longitude, comprises territorial divisions under no less than 89 chieft, holding an 
area of about 4,000 square miles, with a p<^>ulation of about 447,000 souls, and a revenue of nearly eight lacs of Rupees. The 
principal state of this group is Idar. Of the rest, eleven are states of some consequence, with an average popnlatkni of over 
8,000 souls. Tbe remaining forty-eeven are small estates with an average population of 3,000 souls. 

R n oa k m nim lies between the rivers Tapti and Mahi, within the parallels of sx* 33' and 33* 33' North, and meridiams of 73* 3' 
and 74* iS' East, with an extreme length from north to south of about 140 miles, and a breadth from east to west varying from 
10 to 50 miles. It derives its name from the Nerbudda or Rewa which passes through it from east to west. This agency com- 
prises a group of one first dass, five second class, and fifty-five smaller chiefships, with an estimated area of 4,793 square miles, a 
population of about 500,000 souls and a revenue (A Ks. 16,37,000. Of the three Mehwas groups, the Sa$tkfud€Uy 37 in number, 
He on the right bank of the Nerbudda, between Rajpipla and Chhota Udepur ; th/tPatidttSt ^sin number, on the left bank of the 
Mahi, south of Balasinor, and the Dorkas^ 3 in number, <»i the borders of the Mahi. Rajpif^ is the chief state <^ this group. 

The peninsula of Kaityvoarf surrounded on almost every side by the sea, and teeming with native chiefs, chiefly Rajputs^ 
is divided into ten Pra$Uhs or districts, v£r., Barda^ Hollar^ Gohelwad^ JhalUnvad^ Kattywar, Btibriamar^ Sorath, 
Mackukamta,^ Okhmamdal^ and Und Sarviya, This peninsula contains no less than 186 territorial divisions, great and small, 
Ae most extensive of which cover about 3,800 square miles, whilst other divisions contain but a single village ; until c<Mnpleti<m 
of the survey, the area of the peninsula can only be arrived at approximately, and may be estimated at 33,000 square miles, with 
a population of 1,884,800 souls, and a revenue of R*. 1,03,33,450. The smaller states are grouped into administrarive sub- 
divisions, under officers subordinate to the Agency, but the jurisdiction of the more important chiefs has been maintained. The 
whole body of chiefr has been classified into seven grades in accordance with their jurisdictional privileges. All have moreover 
been divided into three classes, with reference to their position politically as regards the paramount power. For those in the 
firrt dass, who rule over seven-tenths of the whole province, the Political Agent exercises no control over the management of 
their states. The powers of those in the second dass are suppleniented by the authority of the Political Agent, while in the case 
of the third dass, the administration is virtually vested in the Political Officers. The great state of Jetpur, yidding a revenue of 
Rft. 10,00,000 has been ranked in the fifVh dass jurisdiction, on accotmt <^ its being partitioned among eighteen shareholders. 

The Native States in the south part <^ the Bombay Presidency represent the remains of the Maratha empire ; the princL 
pal state of the southern group is Kolhapur, 

The State of Ptint lapsed to the British Government in 1878, and is now induded in the Nasik district. 

The State of Nttrukot is managed by British officials, and the Chief is allowed half the revenue as income. 

The MtwaH9xA Da$tg%\»XM of the Khandesh Agency, lie in the north-west comer of the Khandesh district between the 
Nerbudda and Tapti rivers. The inhabitants of this wild forest region are BhiU^ and the prindpal income of the chiefs is 
derived fircMU the manufacture and sale of a liqa(Hr called *' Maura** 

BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

Area^ Position^ Boundaries^ &c. 
Western India, or the territory under the administration of the Government of 
Bombay, known as the Bombay Presidency, extends from North Latitude 28* 45', the 
most northerly point of Sind, to 13'' 53' in the extreme south of the Kanara district, and 
from East Longitude 66* 40', the most westerly point of Sind, to 76* 30' the eastern ex- 
tremity of Khandesh, the extreme length of the whole territory being about 1,100 miles, and 
breadth about 300 miles. This jurisdiction comprises a total estimated area of 198,809 
square miles, the area of the British possessions being 125,849 square miles and that of the 
native dependencies about 72,960* square miles. The Presidency is bounded on the 
west by the Arabian Sea ; on the north-west and north by Beluchistan ; on the north-east 
by the British district of Muzaffargarh, the native state of Bahawalpur under the Punjab 



' This figure is open to correction after the surveys are completed. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



154 The Bombay Presidency, — Continued. 

jurisdiction, and the native states of Jeysulmere, Jodhpore, Sirohee, Oodeypore, Dongar- 
pur and Banswara of the Rajputana Agency ; on the east by the native states of Jabua, 
Ali-Rajpur, Barwani and Indore of the Central India Agency, the British district of 
Nimar in the Central Provinces, the Berar assigned district of Buldana and the Nizam's 
territory ; and on the south by the native state of Mysore and the British district of 
Bellary in the Madras Presidency. An area of 360 square miles was transferred in 1878, 
from the British district of Khandesh to Indore, the population so transferred is not 
known. 

The only foreign possessions included within the limits of the Presidency are those 
of the Portuguese Gorvernment, m., Goa, Daman and Diu, which are described at 
page 164. 

Topography, &c. 

The natural divisions of this Presidency may be classified as follows : — isf, Hie pr(h 
vince of Sind — the valley of the lower Indus, — a flat plain about 360 miles in length from 
north to south, and about 270 miles in its greatest breadth from east to west, containing 
an area of 54,985 square miles, without hills and with but scant vegetation, depending 
for its productiveness entirely on the water of the river, obtained partly by natural inun- 
dation during the months of flood, and partly by canal irrigation. 2nd, Gujarat^ embra- 
cing the peninsulas of Cutch and Kattywar, consisting — except in its northern parts — 
of rich and highly cultivated plains, alluvial in their origin but not now subject to in- 
undation. 3rd, The Konkan, or the lowlands lying between the base of the Ghats and the 
sea, a difficult country intersected by creeks and abounding in isolated peaks and detached 
ranges of hills. 4th, The plains of Khandesh and the Deccan, drained by large rivers, 
with tracts of much fertility near their banks. 5th, The Kamatic, or country south of the 
Krishna, consisting of extensive plains of black or cotton soil in a high state of 
cultivation. 

The districts of the Presidency are classified as follows, with reference to the natural 
divisions above named : — 

Sind Districts, — Kurrachee or Karachi, Thar and Parkar, Hyderabad, Shikarpur 
and Upper Sind Frontier. ^ 

Gujarat Districts, — Surat, Broach, Kaira, Panch Mahals and Ahmedabad 

Konkan Districts, — Ratnagiri, Kolaba and Thana. 

Deccan Districts, — Ahmednagar, Khandesh, Nasik, Poona, Satara and Sholapur. 

South Maratha Districts, — Belgaum, Dharwar, Kalad^, and Kanara. 

The physical features which give their peculiar character ^o the above diflerent parts 
of the Presidency, are the river Indus in Sind ; the gulfs of Cif tch and Cambay and the 
Rann of Cutch in Gujarat, and the rivers Nerbudda and Tapti in Gujarat proper; the 
river Tapti in Khandesh; the rivers Godavari and Bhima in the Deccan; and the Western 
Ghats, separating the plateaux of Khandesh and the Deccan from the Jow-lying plains of 
Gujarat and the Konkan. 

The chief mountain ranges have a general direction from north to ;^outh. On the 
north of the Presidency are the Hala mountains, a continuation of the ^eat Suleiman 
range on the right bank of the Indus, separating Sind from Baluchistan. liCaving Sind 
and passing by the ridges of low sand hills, — the leading feature of the deserts east of the 
Indus — and the isolated hills of the peninsulas of Cutch and Kattywar, the first extensive 
mountain chain is that separating Gujarat from the states of Central India, These hills 



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The Bombay Presidency,— Continued. 155 

rising in the neighbourhood of Mount Abu, and stretching southwards to the valley of 
the Nerbudda, may be considered as an extension of the Aravalli range. From the 
valley of the Nerbudda, still extending towards the south, run the hills known as the 
Western Ghats or Sahyadri range. This great range of hills, stretching southwards for 
upwards of 500 miles, forms the great characteristic feature of Western India; running 
parallel with the whole coast at a distance of from forty to fifty miles, with a general 
elevation of upwards of 1,800 feet, they contain individual peaks rising to more than 
double that height, and extend over a belt of country in many places not less than twenty 
miles in breadth. Theur western declivity is abrupt though not generally precipitous, the 
land at their base being but slightly raised above the level of the sea. The landward 
or eastern slope is gentle, the crest of the range being in many places but slightly raised 
above the level of the plateau of the Deccan. Towards the northern extremit}' of this range, 
the country is rugged and broken, and contains isolated peaks and spurs which run east- 
wards, forming watersheds for the great rivers of the Deccan, the principal continuation 
to the eastward being the Satpura range, separating, as far as they extend, the valley of the 
Tapti from that of the Nerbudda, and the district of Khandesh from the territories of 
Holkar, and attaining an elevation of over 5,©oo feet, — Toran Mall, on this range, in the 
vicinity of Dhulia, being about 5,434 feet at the summit, and 4,304 feet at the lake — and 
the Satmala or Ajanta hills, separating Khandesh from the Nizam's territory on the south. 
This last range is of less importance, being rather the northern slope of the plateau of the 
Deccan than a distinct range of hills. 

In proportion to its area, the Bombay Presidency has the advantage of an extensive 
line of coast, regular and unbroken save by two deep inlets, — the gulfs of Cambay and 
Cutch, — and extending from Honawar in North Latitude 14° 3', to Karachi in North Lati- 
tude 25**. This coast is for the most part rock-bound and difficult of access, and though 
it contains many estuaries forming fair weather ports for vessels engaged in the coasting 
trade, Bombay, Karachi and Karwar alone have harbours sufficiently landlocked to 
protect shipping during the prevalence of the south-west monsoon. 

The chief river of Western India is the InduSy with a course from Attock to the sea 
of 962 miles. In the dry season the surface water varies in breadth from 500 to i,6oa 
yards. The greatest depth is found between Kalabagh and Attock, where it is 186 feet 
The season of floods begins in March and continues to September, the average depth 
of the river rising during the inundation, from nine to twenty-four feet, and the velocity 
of the current increasing from three to seven miles an hour. The discharge of water, 
which in December is calculated at 40,857 cubic feet per second, is estimated in August, 
to attain to more than ten times that amount Next to the Indus in length and in 
volume of water comes the Nerbudda, Rising in the Central Provinces and traversing 
the territory of Holkar, this river after a course of 700 miles falls into the gulf of Cambay, 
forming near its mouth the alluvial plain of Broach, one of the richest districts of the 
Presidency. For about one hundred miles from the sea, the Nerbudda is at all seasons navi- 
gable by small boats, and during the rains by vessels of from thirty to fifty tons burthen. The 
river next in importance is the Taptiy draining an extensive portion of country, and being 
from a commercial point of view, the most useful of Gujarat rivers. Of other Gujarat 
streams, the Sabarmati rising in the northern, and the Mahi rising in the southern extre- 
mity of the Mahikantahills, deserve notice; these rivers drain the districts of northern Gujarat 
and fall into the sea near the head of the gulf of Cambay. In the Konkan there are 
several minor streams rising in the Sahyadri range, and flowing westward into the Arabian 
Sea, which though formidable torrents in the rains, fall ofi* in volume with the return of 



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156 The Bombay Presidency, — Continued. 

Cur weather, and during the hot season cease to flow. Rising further" inland, the Canarese 
rivers in the south have a larger body of water and a more r^ular flow than the streams 
of the Konkan, one of them, the Sherawati^ forcing its way through the western crests of 
the Ghats, plunges from the high to the low country by a succession of falls, the principal 
of which is 890 feet on the eastern side. The Godavari and Krishna rivers rising in the 
Sahyadri range, and collecting to themselves several tributary streams, some of them of 
considerable magnitude, drain the entire plain of the Deccan as they pass eastwards 
towards the Bay of Bengal 

With the exception of the Manchar lake in Sind and the Rann of Cutck^ this Presi- 
dency is almost entirely without natural lakes : situated on the right bank of the Indus in 
the neighbourhood of the town of Sehwan, in district Karachi, the Manchar lake^ when 
fed by the waters of the river during the months of flood, attains a length of twenty 
miles and a breadth of ten, covering a total area estimated at 180 square miles. The 
most peculiar natural feature of the Presidency is the Rann of Cutch^ a salt marsh, an 
inland lake, or an arm of the sea according to the season of the year. The area of this 
Rann, divided into two portions, the greater and lesser Rann, has been estimated at about 
9,000 square miles. It forms the western boundary of Gujarat, and when flooded during 
the rains, by imiting the gulfs of Cutch and Cambay, converts the state of Cutch into an 
island. In the dry season the soil is impregnated with salt, the surface in some places 
being moist and muddy, and in others like a dry river bed, or sea beach strewn with 
gravel and shingle. Opinions are varied as to the formation of the Rann and its character, 
its present condition being probably the result of some natural convulsion. The greater 
Rann to the north is about 160 miles from east to west, and 80 from north to south, and 
the little Rann to the east, 80 miles from east to west, and from ten to forty broad 
from north to south. Two artificial sheets of water, from their size, deserve a place among 
the lakes of the Presidency, these are Vehar in the neighbourhood of Bombay, and Karak- 
wasla near Poona. The former situated about 16 miles distant from Bombay in a group 
of hills near Thana, supplies water to the city of Bombay, and has an area of 1,400 acres; 
the latter supplying water to Poona and irrigating the country in its neighbourhood, covers 
an area of 3,500 acres. 

The wooded tract of country known as The Dangs^ is a rough mountain r^on, 
lying between the table-land of the Khandesh district and the seaboard plains of Gujarat, 
this tract, with the district of Kanara in the south, is almost entirely devoted to the pro- 
duction of timber. 

The whole Presidency is intersected with good roads which connect the principal 
towns and facilitate the transport of produce. An extensive Railway system is also being 
developed, Bombay being connected by railways with Madras, Nagpore, Calcutta, 
Rajputana and Hyderabad. The following lines of railway run through the Presidency, 
all of which are open for traffic : — The Great Indian Peninsula line from Bombay to 
Jubbulpore towards the north-east, and from Bombay to Madras towards the south-east, 
these lines diverging from Kalian Junction. The Bombay^ Baroda and Central India 
Railway from Bombay to Ahmedabad, and thence on to Wadhwan, with a branch striking 
off from Anand to Pali ; the Kattywar State Railway from Wadhwan to Bhaunagar ; the 
Patri State Railway from the Veramgam station on the Bombay, Baroda and Central 
India line, to Patri, and the Gaikhwar's line of Railway branching off from Miagam to 
Daboi, The Dhond and Manmad State Railway connecting with the northern and 
southern lines of the Great Indian Peninsula Railway at the stations from which the line 
is named The Western Rajputana State Railway, starting towards the north from 



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The Bombay Presidency, --Continued. 157 

Ahmedabad station of the Bombay, Baroda and Central India line, and open for 
traffic up to Palanpur and Deesa. The Sind^ Punjab and Delhi Railway from 
Kurrachee to Kotri, connecting with the Indus Valley State Railway line running from 
thence to Bahawalpur and Mooltan; while surveys of lines to connect the Sind 
Punjab and Delhi line witlv the Bombay, Baroda and Central India Railway, as well 
as for the extension of the Madras Railway from Bellary to Karwar vid Hubli, with a branch 
to Goa, and from Wadhwan through the peninsula of Kattywar, have been completed 
The Kandahar State Railway, from Ruk Station near Sukkur on the Indus Valley line, 
passing through Jacobabad and Sibi, to be eventually extended to Kandahar, a distance of 
about 400 miles from Ruk, with branches to Quetta, and to Pir Chauki at the foot of the 
Bolan pass, is now completed to about twenty miles beyond Sibi, the surveys for the 
remainder of the line to Kandahar being in progress. 

In Sind, the Delta of the Indus is scored with numerous inundation canals, no less 
than 163 in number, and of a total length of 5,643 miles, irrigating an area of upwards 
of two million acres; twelve of these canals, of a length of 1,287 miles, lie on the 
right bank of the river, and one hundred and fifty-one, of a length of 4,356 miles, on 
the left bank. The chief of these canals are the Begariy 148 miles in length, and the 
Desert canal, 60 miles, in the Upper Sind Frontier district ; the Sind canal, 67 miles, the 
Sakkar canal, 127 miles, the Deharwa^ 45 miles, the Masuwah, 32 miles, the Maharowah^ 
37 miles, the Koraiwah^ 23 miles, and the Arorwah^ 21 miles, in the Shikarpur District; the 
Gharcsinalf 283 miles, the Ndra^ 217 miles, the IVahur, 38 miles, the Mittrau, 141 miles 
and the TTiar canal, 52 miles, in the Thar and Parkar district; the Hyderabad district canals^ 
1,760 miles; the Mehrab^ 61 miles, the Nasraty 72 miles, the Naolakhi, 137 miles, the 
DambrOy 58 miles, the RJuin^ 141 miles, the Alibhar^ 75 miles, the Great Marak^ 212 
miles, the Gharo^ 267 miles, the Sarfraz^ 102 miles, the Fulali^ 994 miles, the Mulchand^ 
64 miles, and the Chandan^ 24 miles; the Kurrachee district canals ^ 1,360 miles; the Western 
Nara^ 37 miles, t\i& Phitu^ 27 miles, the Kalri^ 136 miles, the Bagar^ 125 miles, the 
Pinyariy 410 miles, the ScLtuh^ 58 miles, and the Khantah^ 70 miles. Other portions of the 
Presidency have irrigation channels of a smaller class, the chief of these are, the Tapti , 
canal in Surat ; the Panjhra and Jamda canals in Khandesh ; the Palkhed and Wadalt 
canals in Nasik ; the Ojhar^ the Lakh^ the Mutha and Nira canals in Ahmednagar ; the 
Rewariy the Yerla^ the Gondauli and Krishna canals in Satara ; the Gokak canal in 
Belgaum ; the Hathmati and Sabarmati canals in Ahmedabad. 

Climate and Sanataria. 

In a territory extending through so many degrees of latitude, containing lowlands 
lying near the coast and elevated plateaux remote from the sea, while receiving in 
its more southern parts the full force of the south-west monsoon, extending northwards 
beyond its influence, great varieties of climate are met with. In Upper Sindh, the 
extreme dryness and heat, combined with the aridity of a sandy soil, make up a climate 
resembling that of the sultry deserts of Africa. The mean maximum temperature at 
Hyderabad in lower Sindh, during the six hottest months of the year, has been given at 
ninety-eight in the shade, while the water of the Indus reaches blood heat ; in Upper Sind 
it is even hotter, the thermometer being known to register 130" in the shade. In Cutch 
and in Gujarat, the heat though less, is also very great The Konkan is hot and moist, 
the fall of rain during the monsoon sometimes nearly approaching 300 inches. The table 
land of the Deccan above the Ghats on the contrary has a very agreeable climate, as has 
also the southern Maratha country, and in the hills of Mahableshwar, — where there is a 

w 



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158 The Bombay Presidency, — Continued. 

sanitarium,— of Singarh and other detached heights, Europeans may go out at all hours 
with impunity. Bombay island itself, though in general cooled by the refreshing sea-breeze, 
is oppressively hot during May and October. The south-west monsoon generally sets 
in about the first week in June, and pours a prodigious quantity of rain along the coast, 
from June till October therefore travelling is difficult and unpleasant, except in Sind, where 
the monsoon rains exert no influence. The Sanataria of the Presidency will be found in 
the list of the military stations. 

Staples and Manufactures. 

Agriculture is the chief employment of the bulk of the population in this presi- 
dency. The ordinary natural productions are cotton, rice, the Indian millets, barley, 
pulses and grain of every kind, potatoes, sugar-cane, coffee, red-pepper, oil-seeds, turmeric 
and tobacco. Coal is found in Cutch, and indigo, hemp, jute and other fibres are 
produced in Sind and the Konkan. 

The principal manufacture of the Presidency is that of cotton, for which there are 
now forty-two mills, and about 2,550 gins, chiefly in Bombay, Gujarat and Khandesh. 
In addition to the cotton mills, one jute and two silk mills are at work in Bombay, where 
Chinese silk workers have also begun to establish themselves and do a thriving business. 
Dyeing, tanning, working in metal, and the manufacture of indigo, sugar, paper, soap 
and glass are also carried on, but to a limited extent In Sind, the chief manufacturing 
district of which is Hyderabad, blankets, carpets, rugs, leather work, gold and silver 
work, cutlery and ivory toys, are manufactured, while in the villages along the whole length 
of the coast, the fishermen cure and export large quantities of fish. Pottery is made 
everywhere for local consumption and use. The forests contain valuable timber, gums, 
drugs and dyes, also cocoanuts, fi-om the kernel of which oil is largely extracted, and coir 
fibre from the outer husk. The Bombay box work made in Bombay and Surat, gives 
employment to several hundred workmen, carving in sandal wood, ebony and black-wood 
is also carried on. Though deficient in mineral wealth, the Presidency is abundantly sup- 
plied with stores of stone fitted for building and road making purposes. There are large 
limestone and slate quarries, and iron ore is mined and smelted in the Dharwar, Belgaum 
and Kurrachee districts, while the adjacent hills in Baluchistan near Kurrachee, are re- 
ported to produce a variety of minerals, such as gypsum, copper, lead, antimomy and 
sulphur. 

Form of Administration. 

The civil divisions of the Bombay Presidency comprise the regulation districts, 
with the non-regulation territories of the Panch Mahals in Gujarat, and the province of 
Sind. The Government is administered by a Governor and his Council This body is 
the chief executive and legislative authority of the Presidency, which for administrative 
purposes is divided into four divisions, embracing (including Bombay) twenty-four 
districts, each division being placed under the control and superintendence of a Com- 
missioner, and each district under a Collector and Magistrate subordinate to the 
Commissioner, the district officer being the chief unit of executive administration. 
Each district is again sub-divided for Revenue purposes into Talukas or sub-divi- 
sions, under Magisterial and Revenue officers subordinate to the district officers, 
these sub-divisional officers are styled Mamlatdars and Deputy Collectors. The Judicial 
organisation of the regulation districts is entrusted to a High Court, and in Sind to a 
Judicial Commissioner, assisted by District and Sessions Judges. Bombay like Calcutta 
has a special administration of its own, with a separate establishment of Police under con- 



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The Bombay Presidency, — Continued. 159 

trol of a Commissioner, and courts for the administration of civil and criminal justice 
municipal matters and taxation within the town limits being entrusted to, and managed by 
a Chairman and Board of Justices specially appointed. 

Census. 
A general census was taken throughout the Presidency on the night of the 21st 
February 1872, giving a population of 16,199,144 souls in British territory, the average 
density for all the collectorates being 129 persons to the square mile, and varying from a 
maximum of 29,291 in Bombay city, to 14 in Thar and Parkar in Sind. Of the total 
population, Hindus constitute seventy-six per cent, Mahomedans seventeen per cent, 
Aborigines three and a half per cent, and the remainder, viz.^ Christians, Parsis, Buddhists 
and others, three and a half per cent The proportion of males to females being fifty-two to 
forty-eight; more than three-fourths of the entire population are Hindus ; their maximum 
number is in Satara, their minimum in the Upper Sind Frontier districts. The Maho- 
medans preponderate in Sind, and their minimum number is in the Panch Mahals district 
Except in Sind, the Buddhists are widely scattered through all the Collectorates. The 
Christians are chiefly in Bombay city, Poona and Thana. The Indo-Portugese and Native 
Christians form nearly one-half of the entire Christian population. Two-thirds of the entire 
Parsi population is in Bombay city alone, and of the remaining third, one-half is in the 
dty of Surat. The Aboriginal tribes are chiefly in the collectorates of Surat, Khandesh 
• and Nasik. 



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V. 

THE FRENCH TERRITORIES. 



VI. 

THE PORTUGUESE TERRITORIES. 



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i63 
THE FRENCH TERRITORIES. 



The French territories in India consist of several detached portions, all subject to the 
jurisdiction of the Governor residing at Pondicherry, to whom the general government of these 
possessions is confided. Their total area is 178 square miles, with a total population of 271,460 
souls. The several settlements arc as follow : — 

IN BENGAL. 
/. CHANDERNA GORE, — Area about three square miles or 2,330 acres. Latitude of town 
22* 50' N., Longitude 88** 23' E. Distance from Calcutta seventeen miles north. The settlement 
of Chandemagore lies on the right bank of the Hooghly river in the district of Hooghly. The 
population numbers about 22,600. Chandemagore appears to have been in the occupation of 
the French as early as 1700, the year in which Calcutta first became a British settlement. Forty 
years later the settlement attained a high degree of opulence and splendour, which it retained 
until its capture by Clive in 1757. France recovered Chandemagore with the rest of her 
settlements in India, under the treaty with England of 1763. It was again taken by the British 
in 1793, and finally restored at the general peace of 18 16. The principal production is opium. 

IN MADRAS. 

2. KARIKAL. — Area fifty-two square miles. Population 91,468. Latitude of town io*53'N. 
Longitude 79* 57 'E. Distance from Tanjore forty-seven miles north. This settlement lies within 
the district of Tanjore in the Madras Presidency, and is situated on the Coromandel Coast of the 
Bay of Bengal, on a small estuary of the river Cauvery. It has several large manufactories of 
cotton fabrics, and carries on an active trade in rice, which is its principal production. This terri- 
tory was restored at the general peace of 1 816, on the condition that no fortifications should be 
erected thereon, and no military retained, but such as may be required for purposes of police. 

3. MA HE, — Area five square miles. Population 8,469. Latitude of town 1 1° 42' N., Longi- 
tude 7 5*38' E. Distance from Tellicherry seven miles. A settlement on the coast within the district 
of Malabar of the Madras Presidency, and situated on the south side of the estuary of a small 
river flowing from the Western Ghats, and navigable for boats a considerable distance inland. 
This place was taken by the British in 1793, and restored to the French at the general peace of 
1815. The Carmelites have a church and a missionary establishment here. 

4. YANAONor YANAN, — ^Area five square miles or 3,147 acres. Population 5,460. Lati- 
tude of town 16^44' N., Longitude 82° 16' E. A settlement within the Godavari district of the Pre- 
sidency of Madras, and situated near the bifurcation of the Godavari river, and the river of 
Coringa, and about nine miles above the embouchure of the former. The Coringa river has 
a deep channel which admits of vessels of 200 tons burthen proceeding as high as Yanaon. 
This territory stretches along the banks of the two- rivers for a distance of six miles. 

5. PONDICHERRY, — Area 113 square miles. Population 143,500. Latitude of town ii* 
53'N., Longitude 79* 5^' E. This territory consists of, first, the district of Pondicherry proper, 
containing, besides the town, eleven villages ; second, the district of Vallanor of forty-five villa- 
ges ; third, the district of Bahour of thirty-six villages. The chief exports are fine blue cottons 
and cotton yam. The settlement is included in the district of South Arcot of the Madras Presi- 
dency, and is situated on the Coromandel Coast of the Bay of Bengal, at the mouth of a small 
river capable of admitting only coasting craft of small burthen. The Govemor of Pondicherry 
rules over the whole of the French settlements in India. The town is pleasantly situated and 
healthy, and contains a population of about 40,000, and is distant from Madras about eighty- 
six miles south. It is connected by Railway with Madras. Pondicherry being the principal seat 
of Government for all the French settlements in India and Indo-China, matters of importance 
are negociated through the Collector of South Arcot. Minor matters, however, at the outlying 
stations of Karikal, Yanaon and Mahe are dealt with by the Collectors at those places without 
reference to Pondicherry. 



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1 64 

THE PORTUGUESE TERRITORIES. 



The only settlements now left to the Portuguese, of all the vast territories which were 
once under their rule and influence in India, are Goa, Daman and Diu, containing a total area 
of 1,096 square miles, and a population of about 407,700 souls. The following description of 
these places will suffice : — 

1. GOA, — ^Area, 1,062 square miles. Population, 363,780. Revenue, Ss. ;^,20,ooo. Military 
force, about 3,000. The territory of Goa lies on the western or Malabar coast of India 
in the Bombay Presidency, and is bounded on the north by the native state of Sawant 
Wari, on the east by the districts of Belgaum and north Canara, and on the west by the 
Indian Ocean. The Principality is about sixty-four miles in length from north to south, and 
twenty in breadth from east to west. Two-thirds of the population are stated to be Chris- 
tians of the Roman Catholic persuasion. The settlement is divided into two districts, Salsette 
and Bardes, which are again subdivided into parishes, the largest of which is Pangaum or 
Panjim, containing the present seat of Government. The new town, Panjim, or Villa Nova de 
Goa, containing about 20,000 souls, chiefly of Portuguese descent, is situated at the entrance of 
the harbour, and is defended by several fortresses, one of which, called Algoada, stands dose 
to the shore, on the point forming the north extremity of the bay. The harbour, formed by an 
arm of the sea into which flows a small river, is distant about five miles from the old city of Goa, 
which is now almost entirely deserted. It is connected with the new city by a stone causeway 
about 300 yards long. Old Goa contains many fine buildings, churches and monasteries, but 
it is fast becoming a mass of deserted ruins. The inhabitants are almost entirely ecclesiastics. 
The chief products of the territory are rice, only in sufficient quantity for the consumption 
of the inhabitants, hemp, pepper, cocoanut, betel-nut, and salt, which latter article is manu- 
factured to a very large extent. The territory is well-watered, fertile, and in most places wcD 
cuhivated, Latitude of new town 15"* 29' N. Longitude 73' 53' E. Distance from Bombay 
260 miles. 

2. Z?^J/^ A''.— Area twenty-two square miles. Population 33,160. The district of Daman, 
in the Thana district of the Bombay Presidency, is about seven miles in length from north to south, 
and four in breadth. The capital or town of Daman is situated on the Damanganga, or river of 
Daman which rises in the Western Ghats, or about 40 miles further east, and is fortified, having 
a rampart with ten bastions and two gateways. The fort is called the castle of St. Hiaronymus. 
Daman is an excellent place for small vessels to remain at during the south-west monsoon and 
for the purpose of repair, the country being well-stocked with ship timber. Provisions and v^e- 
tables are cheap and plentiful. Daman was sacked and burned by the Portuguese in 1531, it 
was subsequently rebuilt and taken by the Portuguese in 1558, since which time it has remained 
one of their possessions. Latitude of the town 20' 21' N., Longitude 72** 53' E. Distance fiom 
Bombay loi miles. 

3. DIU, — Area twelve square miles. Population 10,765. Latitude of town 20* 42' N., Longi- 
tude 71' i' E. Distance from Bombay 170 miles. Diu is an island on the south coast of the 
peninsula of Katty>var, in the Gujarat province of the Bombay Presidency. The Portuguese ob- 
tained possession of the place in 1 5 1 5. The town is situated at the eastern extremity of the island 
which extends from east to west about seven miles, and north to south about two miles. The soil 
of the island being itself little productive, vegetables and other provisions are brought from 
the mainland. The channel between the island and mainland is navigable only for fishing 
boats and other small crafl, the western entrance, which is defended by a fort, having four or 
iiv^ feet of water on the bar when lowest. The town is well fortified, being surrounded by a 
wall strengthened with towers at regular intervals. Notwithstanding the excellence of the 
harbour for ships of moderate draught, there is but little traffic. Diu head, two miles to the 
westward of the west end of Diu island, has on its east side, a small harbour where vessels 
might lie sheltered from the westerly winds, in from two to three and a half fathoms. 



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VII. 

OUTLYING INDEPENDENT STATES. 

OCEAN ISLANDS near the Malabar, Coromandel& Burmah Coasts. 

THE STRAITS SETTLEMENTS. 

GLOSSARY OF INDIAN TERRITORIAL DESIGNATIONS. 

THERMAL STATISTICAL TABLES, &c. 

RELIGIONS AND PEOPLES of INDIA. 



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i67 
OUTLYING INDEPENDENT STATES. 

BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

AFGHANISTAN— TYiis so-called country extends from the Punjab on the east, to 
Persia on the west, and stretches down from the Amu Daria or Oxus river on the north, to 
the frontier of Baluchistan on the south. On the north, the boundary of the country 
as known to us at the present day, runs along the river Oxus or Amu Daria, (called 
also Ab-i-Panjah at its head) from lake Victoria (Sir-i-Kul) at its source in the great 
Pamir plateau, to Khoja Saleh, there leaving the river with a slight southerly curve, it goes 
across the Dasht-i-Chul desert to Robat Abdula Khan on the Murghab river, and thence on to 
Sarakhs on the Hari-Rud or Tajend river, where it touches the Persian frontier. On the west, 
starting from Sarakhs, the boundary follows the course of the Hari-Rud to a point near the 
village of Toman Aga, where it leaves that river and runs due south for about eighty miles, 
and then follows a straight course to the Cha Sagak pass (3,800 feet above sea level), from 
thence it turns off in a south-easterly direction for about twenty miles, and then runs due 
south to a point about five miles east of the village of Bandan in Persian territory, from thence 
it again turns in a south-easterly direction, passing through the Hamun swamp to the river 
Helmand, which marks its course for about thirty miles up to the town of Kuhak, whence it 
turns off in a direct south-westerly course to the peak of Kuh-Malik-i-Siyah, its extreme south- 
western limit. The southern boundary touching on Baluchistan is not so definite, but may be 
said to run through the sandy desert, along, or in the vicinity of, the parallel of 30", up to within 
thirty or forty miles of Quetta, whence it turns in a north-easterly direction, beyond which it is 
for the present unknown. The eastern boundary has always been considered conterminous with 
the British line of the Punjab frontier. The extreme north-eastern limits up to lake Victoria, 
are entirely unknown. It may be as well to mention here, that the country along the eastern 
frontier of Afghanistan, between the Punjab and the Koh Jadran or Kohnak range of hills on 
the west (sometimes called the Western Suliman range), and northward up to the Kuram 
valley, contains numerous tribes who do not, and it is believed never did, own allegiance to 
the sovereign of Kabul. The whole drainage of this part of the country containing these 
independent tribes, flows into the Indus. In the extreme north-east direction also, in the 
country to the east of the Kunar and Chitral valleys, there exist tribes and states more or less 
independent, and who it is believed have always disclaimed the authority of the ruler of Kabul, 
excluding these independent portions, the remainder of the country of Afghanistan includes the 
whole drainage of the Kabul river up to British territory, the whole drainage of the Helmand 
river, the whole drainage to the Hamun swamp from the north, the whole eastern drainage of 
the Hari-Rud, and the country drained by the Murghab south of the supposed north-western 
boundary, as well as the country drained by the southern tributaries of the OxUs, viz,^ the 
Sangalak, the Sar-i-pul, the Balkh, the Khulm, the Kunduz, the Aksarai, and the Vardoj 
streams. The Oxus is navigable to Khoja Saleh, and it is believed that it will prove to be 
quite navigable up to its confluence with the Kafirnahan near Khulm and Kunduz* The drain- 
age of the Helmund and its tributaries the Arghandab and the Tamak, is lost in swamps on 
the west, and on the north the Murghab and Hari-Rud flow into the Kara Kum desert north- 
west of Merv or Naukala and disappear there, being absorbed into the soil. 

The Kabul river, a tributary of the Indus, after a course of about 250 miles falls into 
the Indus at Attock. The principal feeders of this river are the Swat, Lendai, Kunar or Chitral, 
Alingar, Alishang, Tagao, Nijrao, Panjshir and Ghorband from the north ; the Logar, Tezin 
Surkhab, Bara, and Tirah from the south. The other minor rivers of the country are 
the Farah-Rud, Lora, Kuram, Gomal, Shahband and Arghesan. The Hamun swamp above 
alluded to is situated in the province of Sistan on the south-west border of Afghanistan, it is 
about seventy miles in length and about twenty-five miles in breadth, with a depth of from three 

• From fort Pctro Alcxandrofsk to Charjui, the distance of 395 miles was steamed in 7J4 days inclusive of stoppages. From 
Chafjoi to Khoja Saleh, 170 miles, was reached by steamer in 8 days. The whole downward trip to fort Petro AJexandrofsk 
from Khoja Saleh was performed in 10 days by the same steamer. 



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1 68 Outlying Independent States, — Continued. 

, to four feet ; there is another lagoon called Ab-lstada, sixty miles south-west of Ghazni, about 
twelve miles in breadth, and four feet in depth ; the water of both these lagoons is salt. 

The area of the whole territory is about 300,000 square miles. It includes a succession 
of ridges and valleys, the latter being irregular, and the ridges occasionally rising into lofty 
mountains or expanding into plateaux. Starting from the Karambar and Baroghil passes on 
the extreme north-east, at the head of the Chitral or Kashkar valley, Afghanistan is traversed 
by several lofty ranges of mountains, viz,^ the Hindu Kush range terminating at the Haji 
Khak pass, the Koh-i-Baba range, the Siah Koh (black mountains,) the Safed Koh (white 
mountains,) the Tirband-i-Turkestan, the Koh-Jadran or Kohnak (the Western Sulimans,) 
and the Eastern Suliman range. The highest summits are in the Hindu Kush range in the 
north, which sometintes exceed 20,000 feet, many of the passes across the hills being more 
than 10,000 feet. These mountains are the great water partings between the basins of the 
Indus, the Oxus, the Murghab, the Hari-Rud, the Helmand and its tributaries, the Arghandab 
and the Tamak. 

Although by far the greater portion of Afghanistan is a region of desert, rocks and 
inaccessible mountains, it is however, interspersed with several well-watered and fertile valleys, 
yielding all the ordinary crops and the finest fruits and vegetables in abundance. In the forests, 
there are many of the trees common in Europe, and some others peculiar. The asafoetida plant 
grows in great luxuriance,* and the Pine flourishes on the mountain sides up to a height of 10,000 
feet, while Oak, Walnut, Birch and other trees grow at lower altitudes. In many parts, the 
climate brings to perfection many tropical productions. The valley of the Kabul river appears 
to be the most important part of the country ; to the south is the fertile district of Logar, 
drained by the river of that name, a tributary of the Kabul ; to the north is the Koh-i-daman, 
also fertile and highly cultivated, and to the east is the valley of Jellalabad. There is also an 
exceedingly rich and level tract in the vicinity of Herat and Kandahar. 

The mineral wealth of the country is considerable, silver, mercury, copper, antimony 
iron, lead and zinc, are all present, some in abundance, while gold is found in many places. 
There are indications of coal also. 

The principal marts of the country are Kabul, Kandahar and Herat, and a considerable 
foreign trade with India, Persia, Chinese Turkistan, Bokhara and Baluchistan is carried on. 
The manufactures are unimportant, consisting chiefly of shawls and other woollen fabrics, 
which last are seldom exported. The whole commerce and carrying trade of Afghanistan is 
carried on by the Lohanis, (Povindahs) a pastoral tribe of Afghans who occupy the country 
eastward between the Western Sulimans and the Indus. 

The climate of Afghanistan, though varying greatly in different parts, is on the whole 
characterised by dryness and great extremes of temperature. In Cabul and Ghazni the cold is 
intense and snow lies on the ground for three months in the winter. Even in a latitude lower 
than that of Spain or Italy, the severity of a Russian winter is endured. In Jellalabad, however, 
where the elevation is nearly 2,000 feet above the sea, the winter is as mild as in Hindus- 
tan. The heat of summer is everywhere great, and in some places higher than in Bengal. 
At Kabul 6,500 feet above the sea, the thermometer ranges from 90° to loo**, in Kandahar it is 
even higher. 

Afghanistan is not a homogeneous state, peopled entirely by Afghans under the rule of 
one sovereign. It is merely a geographical expression like Turkey, and contains some districts 
almost entirely Afghan, many in which the Afghans form part of a mixed population, like the 
Turks or Greeks in Bulgaria or Roumelia, others in which the Afghan soldiery rule by force 
an alien race, and also large tracts in which the Afghans have never penetrated, and in which 
their language is utterly unknown. About three-fourths of the districts which are principally 
inhabited by Afghans, and which therefore may be called Afghanistan, seem to lie within the 
tract to which we now give this name, the remainder being in the independent portions above 
alluded to. The numbers which follow are of course only approximate, but in the absence 
of better information they must answer for the present. 

Excluding the independent territory, the total number of inhabitants may be taken as 



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Outlying Independent States, — Continued. 169 

5,000,000, and of these perhaps one and three quarter million are true Afghans, who are how- 
ever, in a similar position to the Turks in the Ottoman empire, and like them generally armed 
and trained for war, the remainder are Pathans proper and non-Afghans^ generally traders and 
agriculturists. To take the Afghans in the order of their relative importance we have first the 
KisilbasheSy descendants it is said of military colonies left by Nadir Shah when he overran the 
country. They are modem Persians of mixed Persian and Turkish descent, numbering about 
1 50,000, but from their courage, wealth and enterprise, of far more consequence than a much 
larger number of any other race in the country. They occupy a large and wealthy quarter of 
the city of Kabul, and fill important posts in the civil administration of the country ; they are 
bold and skilful horsemen, intelligent, orderly and amenable to discipline. In religion they are 
Mahomedans of the Shiah persuasion and speak Persian. 

Allied to the Kizilbashes in language are the Tajiks supposed to represent the original 
Persian inhabitant of the land. They number about half a milion. The large tract of hilly 
country extending from the Koh-i-Baba near Kabul, to Herat, and nearly down to Zamin- 
dawar on the south, is called Hasara, This portion has always been almost entirely 
independent of the ruler of Kabul, and no Afghan can pass through it. The more accessible 
of the Hazara districts, betweet Girishk and Herat, only from fear of the Kabul armies pay 
the Amir tribute. It is occupied by tribes of Tartar origin called Hazaras, and towards the 
south-west, Aimaks, and number some 400,000, they are chiefly a pastoral people dwelling in 
secluded villages, or wandering over the hills and living on the produce of their flocks and 
herds, and retaining in many places their ancient customs and habits unchanged since they 
came from the highlands beyond the Oxus. The majority speak Persian and profess the 
Shiah Mahomedan faith. 

Passing into Afghan-Turkistan, which comprises the districts between the Oxus and the 
Hindu-Kush, Koh-i-Baba and the Tirband-i-Turkistan mountains, from the Murghab to the 
Pamirs, i.e.y the Khanates of Maimana, Shibarghan Balkh, Khulm, Kunduz, Badakshan and 
Wakhan, we find the ruling race to be OzbegSy who in some parts form the bulk of the popu- 
lation. In Badakshan, Wakhan and other remote places, the populace is still Tajik or rem- 
nants of the aboriginal races, and the Afghans have only occasionaly appeared as • invaders 
and plunderers, but the memory of their presence is generally sufficient to enforce the pay- 
ment of a tribute to Kabul. The Ozbegs, Tajiks and other inhabitants of this country are esti- 
mated at about 640,000 ; the Ozbegs being originally intruders who crossed the Oxus and 
subdued the Tajiks, to be themselves conquered in turn by the Afghans. 

Separated from Afghan-Turkistan by the Hindu Kush, are a number of valleys mostly well- 
watered and fertile, running generally from the mountain range to the Kabul river. To the west 
and north of Kabul, the spurs and valleys are inhabited by the Kohistanis or mountaineers, wild 
tribes of perhaps mixed origin, turbulent and treacherous, nominally subject to Kabul, but ever 
ready to take advantage of a weak Government. East of these and extending to the snows of 
the Hindu Kush is Kafiristan inhabited by a fair, interesting and somewhat mysterious people, 
called the Siahposh Kafirs (black clothed unbelievers), who seem to be one of the earliest off"- 
shoots of the Aryan race, or more correctly speaking perhaps part of the original stock itself, 
who have remained for ages in or near their original home. Few Europeans have seen any of 
this curious race. They themselves claim descent from Alexander the Great, and it is possible 
that some of the Groeco Bactrians, when driven from the cities in the valley of the Kabul river, 
may have sought refuge in this almost inaccessible region, and have been absorbed by the old 
population. The Kafirs have some distinctively European customs, as sitting on chairs and 
using tables. Up to the present time they have resisted all the attempts of the Afghans to sub- 
due and convert them to Mahomedanism, though those who live on the borders have had to 
submit, and are called " Nimchas," which may be taken to mean half Mahomedans. In num- 
bers the Kafirs with Nimchas and Chitralis are thought to be about 150,000. 

To the east of Kafiristan are the Kunar, Bajaur and Swat hill-men, apparently not 
of Afghan origin, but Afghan in language and other respects. Like their neighbours the 
Momands, they take little interest in Kabul politics and care only to preserve their own inde- 



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I70 Outlying Independent States, — Continued. 

pendence. East and south of these again are the Yusufzaies, one of the principal Afghan 
clans, who live partly in a state of independence and partly in British territory. 

If we now turn to the west we shall find in the sandy wastes of Sistan, nomads of various 
races and wild freebooters in a state of anarchy and misrule. North of Sistan, the western 
frontier is formed by the important province of Herat, where the population is purely Persian > 
the rulers and garrison only being Afghans. Of the Afghans themselves there may be between 
one and a half and two millions in Afghanistan, speaking for the most part their peculiar lan- 
guage Pushtu, of the same family as Sanskrit, though essentially distinct, and being Mahome- 
dans of the Sunni persuasion. They are divided into clans, as the Momands, Ghilzais, Afndis, 
Duranis, &c., each of these being again subdivided into many smaller tribes. 

Afghanistan in fact may be compared to the Turkey of fifty years ago ; the Afghans re- 
presenting the Mahomedans, the Kizilbashes and Tajiks being likened to the Greeks and 
Armenians, and the independent Kafirs and Hazaras to the Montinegrins and Servians. 

The chief towns of Afghanistan are Kabul, Ghazni, Kelat-i-Ghilzai, Herat, Kandahar, 
Balkh, Khulm, Khanabad, Indarab, Khinjan, Narin, Takhtapul, Andhkui, Sar-i-pul, Meruchak 
Kunduz, Maimana, Jellalabad, Chitral, Dir, Girishk, Bamian, Shibarghan, Faizabad, Sabzawar, 
Pishin, Lash, Jowain, Farah, Khash and Ghurian. 

Afghanistan communicates with India by various passes, the chief of which are the Khaibar 
commencing near Peshawar and extending through hills about thirty miles to the plains of 
Jellalabad; the Shutargardan^ vid the Kuram valley, and \\\^ Jagdallak pass through which the 
road from Jellalabad to Kabul 7//4 Gandamak passes. Several other passes also lead into 
Afghanistan across the Eastern Suliman range from the Derajat of the Punjab, through which 
the Povindahs or trading class of Afghans convey their goods, the chief of these are the 
Sakhi Sarwar, the Chachar, the Ghuleri or Gomal, the Draban, the Shangar, the Kaura and 
the Vihova. There are several passes over the Hindu-Kush range into Afghan Turkistan, of 
most of which very little is known beyond the names, the principal are, the Baroghil pass 
(12,000 feet) leading into Wakhan from Chitral ; the Dora (16,000 feet), the Khartaza, the 
Nuksan (17,000 feet), the Agram, the Ishtirak, the Anjuman, the Khawak (13,200 feet), the 
Bazarak, the Parwan, the Salanlang (12,000 feet), the Kushan, the Gwalan, the Gwazyar, the 
Chardarya, the Ghalalaj, the Faringal, the Hajikak (12,000 feet), the Una, and the Shibr. 
The whole of the passes are free from snow about the end of June, but the most elevated peaks 
continue covered throughout the year. An extension of the railway from Peshawar to Kabul 
has been mentioned, to follow the course of the Kabul river, but it is doubtful whether a 
line could be carried along that route, or if it can be constructed at all in that direction. The 
Railway to Kandahar has already been referrea to under ' Bombay Presidency.' 

The capital, Kabul, 6,500 feet above sea level, is encompassed by hills on three sides, and 
is situated in a gorge where the Kabul river breaks through a range or spur from the Paghman 
hills. The modern city with its suburbs is extensive, and reaches across to the north bank of 
the river. On the east side is the fortress of Bala Hissar on a rocky height. The population 
is about 75,000. 

AFGHAN ETHNOLOGY. 

A paper by Mr, A, H, Keane^ published in " Nature ^ 
During the empire of the Sassanides, the whole of the region, from Persia proper to the 
right bank of the Indus, and from the Koh-i-Baba, Ghor and other western continuations of the 
Hindu-Kush to the Arabian Sea, was known as Khorasan, that is. Khoristan, the Land of the 
Sun, or the East. This term, with the gradual reduction of the Persian sway, has shrunk to the 
proportion of a province on the north-eastern frontier of Persia, and has been replaced further 
east by the ethnical expressions Afghanistan and Baluchistan, the lands of the Afghans and 
Baluchis. But these expressions, as so frequently happens, are so far misnomers and deceiving, 
that the lands in question harbour many other peoples besides those from whom they are now 
named. In Balochistan, for instance, the most numerous, powerful, and influential element is 



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Outlying Independent States^— Continued. 171 

not the Baloch at all, but the still unfathomed Brahiii, from which circumstance it has even been 
suggested that the country ought rather to be called Brahuistan. A similar suggestion could not 
certainly well be made with reg£.rd to Afghanistan, for here there is no other people who can 
for a moment compare with the Afghans and Pathans in numbers, or political importance. 
Still the subjoined rough estimate of the population, according to nationalities, will show that 
it is very far from being homogeneous : — 

Afghans and Pathlins Iranian stock 3,520,000 

Tajiks Iranian stock 1,000,000 

Hindkis Hindu Stock 500,000 

Hazaras and Aimaks ... Mongolo-TArtar stock ... 600,000 

Kataghins ... TArki stock ... 200,000 

Badakshis ... Galcha stock ... 100,000 

Balochis ... Iranian stock ... 100,000 

Kizil-Bashes ... TQrki stock ... 75)000 

Kohistanis and Siah Posh ... Galcha stock ... 50,000 

6,145,000 * 

It will be noticed that in this table are included all the races forming part of the present 
Afghan political system taken in its widest sense, whose northern frontier is now marked by the 
upper course of the Oxus. Before dealing with the Afghans proper, with whom we are chiefly 
concerned, a few words may be devoted to each of the minor elements, all of whom continue 
to keep aloof from their neighbours, seldom or never intermarrying, and mostly retaining their 
own national customs, dress, religion, and speech. No general amalgamation has, in fact, yet 
taken place of these heterogeneous ingredients, so that we cannot speak of the Afghan in the 
same sense as we do of, for instance, the Italian, French, or English nations. The Afghan 
race, though by far the most numerous, has been politically predominant only since the death 
of Nadir Shah (1747), and its rule has been far too checquered by intestine strife and foreign 
troubles, to have allowed time or opportunity for the slow process of absorption to have made 
any perceptible progress. Next to them by far the most important are — 

The TajikSy who, here as elsewhere in Central Asia, represent the old civilised Iranian 
communities, co-extensive with the former limits of the Persian empire, but since the ascend- 
ency of the Tdrki, Mughal, Afghan, and Brahui races, now forming politically the subject, 
socially the settled, trading, and agricultural elements in these regions. Persian, or some 
variety of it, is still every where their mother-tongue ; hence, in Afghanistan they are collectively 
known either as Parsivlin, Le.^ Persian-speaking, or Dehgin, />., peasants or agriculturists. "The 
Tajiks are Iranians, a remnant of the old Persian population subdued by the Afghans, but still 
speaking Persian and retaining the Persian type of features." (F. von Stein, in Peterniantis 
Mittheilungen for March, 1879); religion, Sunnite. Remotely allied to them are — 

The Hindkis^ of Hindu stock, who have been long settled here chiefly as traders, forming 
numerous communities, especially in the eastern disti icts, said to be mostly of the Shatri caste ; 
religion Brahminical, speech Hindustani. 

The Hazaras and Aimaks^ occupying the northern highlands between Bamian and Herat, 
the former in the east, the latter in the west, are undoubtedly of Mongolo-Tirtar stock, though 
now speaking rude Persian dialects. They claim descent, some from the Toghiani TArks, 
some from the Koreish Arabs, others from the old Kibti race, but seem really to be military 
■ colonists settled here by Jinghis Khin, Manku Khin, and Timur. The Aimaks (the term 
simply means horde, tribe, clan), are of the Sunni, the Hazaras of the Shiah sect, and are con- 
sequently fiercely opposed to each other. Owing to this circumstance they have often been 
regarded as of different races, but " there seems no reason to doubt that the Aimaks and 
Hazaras are the same people, though separated... by the different sects they have adopted" 
(Col. C. M. MacGregor, " Afghanistan," p. 246) ; type, high cheekbones, with small grey eyes, 

* This figure exceeds by about a million that usually given as the total population of Afghanistan. But recent exploration 
has shown that many of the tribes arc much more numeroa<t than had been supposed, and as our knowledge ^ the country 
ncreases, it will probably be found to contain even a greater population than that here given. 



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172 Outlying Independent States, — Continued. 

scant beard, and low stature. The Aimaks occupy the Gh6r highlands, which must have been 
almost uninhabited when they settled there, for we read in the National Chronicle that about 
1 190 A.D., Sultan Sh6hab-ud-dtn removed all the Afghan tribes from the Gh6r to the Ghazni 
highlands, ** in order to become the bulwarks of the seat of empire and hold in awe the infidels 
of Hindustan." Of the Aimaks there are four main divisions, the so-called "Char Aimak" 
(" Four Hordes") : Taemdris, TaemQnis, Hazara-Zeidnats, and Suris, with a total population, 
according to some authorities, of about 450,000, including those now settled in Khorasan. 
The Hazaras, numbering at least 150,000, occupy the region stretching for 250 miles west from 
K^bulistan, and are divided into thirty-eight main branches with numerous subdivisions, under 
chiefs bearing various titles, such as Khan, Sultan, Ikhtiar, Vali, Mtr, Mettar, and Tukhar, and 
hitherto practically independent of the Durini Amirs. Akin to them are — 

The Kataghans^ a main branch of the Uzbegs, forming the bulk of the population in 
Kunduz and Balkh, that is, the region now known as Afghan Turkestan, stretching from the 
northern slopes of the Hindu-KGsh to the left bank of the Upper Oxus. They take their name 
from a legendary Kata, from whom they claim descent in two main streams, the Beth-bula and 
Cheguna, with five and eleven sub-divisions respectively, each named after one of Kata's 
sixteen sons. Most of the tribes occupy the country south of the Oxus, but 7,000 families are 
now settled north of that river, in Bokhara territory ; religion Sunnite, speech Tiirki ; type, 
small stature, broad face, high cheek bones, sparse beard, small oblique eyes ; are now mostly 
settled agriculturists and traders. 

The Badakhshis^ or natives of Badakhshan, in the extreme north-east, beyond Kunduz 
and abutting on the Pamir table-land, are a pure Aryan race, intermediate between the Iranians 
and Hindus, and of the same stock as the highland Tajiks, whom Ch. de Ujfalvy groups under 
the collective name of Galchas. Chief divisions, Darwazi, Rosh^ni, Shug^ini, and Wakhi, 
or WakhAni ; religion Sunnite, speech Aryan, with Persian and Indian affinities. The Wakhi 
is a distinct variety, retaining many old Sanskritic elements, hence R. Shaw thinks it may be a 
relic of a primitive organic Aryan language current here before the race issued from the Pamir, 
or divided into Vedic and Zendic. It would be interesting to compare it with the Jagnob, 
which Ch. de Ujfalvy tells us is unintelligible to the other Galcha tribes of Ferghana. A Galcha 
skull which has found its way to Paris, has been examined by P. Topinard, who pronounces it to 
be identical with those of the early Keltic Aryans. If their speech also should prove to be of an 
organic Aryan type, as constituted previous to the dispersion, Ch. de Ujfalvy's view might be un- 
reservedly accepted that " Ces pays myst^rieux rec^lent sans le secret de I'origine de notre race.', 

The Balochis^ of Iranian stock, and regarded by the Afghans as their brethren, are 
represented in Afghanistan chiefly by a number of hill tribes in the south-east comer, and by 
some nomads in the south and west along the Lower Helmand. Most of them belong to the 
Rind section of the Baloch race, the more important being the — 

Kasrinis and Bozdars, on north-west border of Dera Ghazi Khan : numerous sub-divisions, 
the Bozdars alone with sixty-four septs (Major Minchin). 

Khosahs, south of Sanghar Pass towards Shikarpur ; four divisions : Kalulani, Bakiani, 
Toniani, Sariani. 

Laghiris, overlooking the Sakhi-Sarwar Pass, Dera Ghazi Khan frontier ; four divisions : 
Aliani, Hadiani, Boglani, Habtiani ; fifty-six sub-divisions. 

GurchAnis, south of the Laghiris, about Chachar Pass. 

Maris, Sham district, east, north, and north-west of Kachi ; four divisions : Ghazani, 
Loharani, Bijarani, Mazarani ; twenty-two sub-divisions. The Mazarani have separated from 
the rest, and are now settled west of Sibi and north of the Bolan Pass. 

BCigtis, south of the Maris ; two divisions : Firozani, Zarkini ; thirteen sub-divisions. 

Kay^nis, Sistin, former rulers of that country ; by some said not to be Balochis, but 
Kdkar Afghans. 

Religion, Sunnite ; speech, a rude, uncultivated variety of the old Persian ; type, regular 
Caucasian features, light or brown complexion ; hair often chestnut and even fair ; eyes light 



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OutFying Independent States, — Continued. 173 

grey and sometimes blue, especially in centre and north. Of the many forms of the national 
name, Baloch, Biloch, BeKich, BaKich, Biliich, &c., Baloch is the best, coming nearest to the 
true pronunciation, as Pottinger assured his French translator, M. Eyries. 

The KM-B€tsh4Sy or "Red Heads," known collectively as Gholam-Khani or Gholam-i-Shah, 
* servants of the King," are of TArki stock, and have been settled in Herat, and the Gulkoh 
mountains, but chiefly in Kibul since the time of Nadir Shah. The term was originally applied 
by Shah Ismail to the Nikdlu, Jawdnsher, and four other trusty Tiirki tribes to whom he 
owed his successes. But since then they have become a sort of brotherhood ^'much akin to 
the Beyyadlyah or * White Boys' of Oman, and bearing some analogy to the Mormons" 
(W. G. Palgrave, "Report on Province Trebizond," 1868). Those of Kibul form three divisions: 
the Jawinsher, originally from Shtsha ; the Afshar, Nadir Shah's tribe, and the Mor&d Khani, 
composed of all the other TArkis who have from time to time removed from Persia to K&bul ; 
religion, Shiah, with secret rites ; speech, Persian, and amongst themselves, Tilrki ; are a very 
fine race, very fair, with an evident mixture of Iranian and Tirtar blood. 

The Koktstanis and Siak Posh (" Highlanders" and « Black Clothes") forming the bulk of 
the population in Kohistan, Swat, Kafiristan, Chitral, and generally of the southern slopes of 
the Hindu- KOsh down to the left bank of the Kibul river, are of pure Aryan stock, allied to 
the Kashmirians, but probably more closely to the Badakhshis and Wakhis. The Kohistanis 
are Moslem, the Siah Posh still mostly pagans, hence called Kdfirs, or Infidels, by their 
neighbours, and their country Kafiristan, Their speech, of which there are ten distinct 
varieties (Major Tanner), is described as neo-Sanskritic, akin to Dardu and Lughmini. But it 
has never been critically studied, and may possibly prove to be pre-rather than neo-Sanskritic ; 
is in any case of great philological interest, having been isolated fi-om the kindred tongues 
since the eruption of IslAm in the tenth century ; type, regular features, blue and dark eyes, 
hair varying from light brown to black, broad open forehead, tall and well-made. But General 
A. Abbot (** Correspondence," edited by C. R. Low, 1879) distinguishes between a fair type with 
blue eyes, the aristocracy " descended of the Greeks"(?) and a very dark type, the aborigines. 
The Kohistanis north and north-west of Kibul, C. R. Markham says, are mainly Tafiks {Proc^ 
Geo. Soc., February 2, 1879, p. 1 17) ; but they are more probably of the kindred Galcha stock, 
for those of Swat are represented as closely akin to the Siah Posh, whom I take to be of this 
race. They form two main sections, the Torwals and Garwis. They have taken a large share 
in the recent events about KibuL The SaJiSy who have also lately been heard of tn the same 
neighbourhood, are simply Siah Posh converts of the Tagao valley, Kunar district, north 
of Kdbul ; three divisions : Wadin, Gorbaz, and Miisawtd ; speech Pashae, closely allied to 
Lughmdni and Kohistani of Swat. 

We come now to ihe Afghans proper, whose original home seems to have been the Kibul 
valley, whence they spread westwards to the Gh6r country, southwards to the Sulimin 
mountains, and more recently down the Helmand and Arghandib valleys to Kandahar.* They 
call themselves Bani-Israel, "Sons of Israel," claiming descent either from Saul or from the ten 
tribes, for on this point they do not seem to be quite clear. But this is of the less consequence 
that both claims are alike inadmissible. Notwithstanding a certain Jewish expression, which 
they have in common with the Armenians and other races of the Iranian plateau, they are 
beyond all doubt an Aryan and not a Semitic race, so far as these terms can be at all used as 
racial rather than linguistic designations. And here it may be well to remember that both 
Aryan and Semite belong equally to one ethnical stock, conventionally known to anthropologists 
as the Caucasian or Mediterranean, and that they can often be distinguished one from the 
other only by the test of language. We have the same phenomenon in Europe, where but for 
their speech, no one would even suspect that the Basques of the western Pyrenees were other 
than a somewhat favourable specimen of the Aryan race. This test, however, is abundantly 
sufiicient to sever them from that connection, and the same test must suffice to remove the 
Afghans from the Semitic to the Aryan group. 

• TDl the time of Sultan Babar, founder of the Mugal eminre (beginning of sixteenth century), the Afghan language was 
till confined to the north-ea»lcm and western highlands, Persian elsewhere current, as it sdll is mostly in the lowlands. 

Y 



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I 



174 



Outlying Independent States, — Continued. 



Their most general and apparently oldest national name is Pukhtiin or PakhtQn, as it is 
pronounced by the Khaibaris, and which has been identified with the xaicrvcs, of whom 
Herodotus heard through Scylax (509 B.c) as situated about the junction of the K6phes (K&bul) 
and Indus. Their country they still call PukhtChi-khwa, which is equivalent to Watan-khwa, 
or " Home Land" ; their language is always called by them the Pukhtii, softened in the west to 
PushtCk, and from Pakhtina, the plural of Pakhtiin, comes the form Pathin, by which they are 
known throughout India. This word has been connected with the root Pukhta, a hill, so that 
Pukhtun would mean Highlander. But such derivations are seldom trustworthy, and it may be 
questioned whether any people have ever called themselves Hill-nun^ though often enough so 
named by their neighbours. 

The alternative national name, Afghan, by which they are exclusively known in Persia and 
Europe, has been regarded by some as synonymous with Pukhtiin, both meaning " set free f 
but by others it has been connected with A^vakan, the A^vaka, or " Horsemen," of the 
Mahllbhirata, who are supposed to be the Assakani, or Assekenes, of the later Greek historians. 
The natives themselves draw a distinction between the two names, so that although all Afghans 
are Pukhtina, not all Pukhtina are true Afghans. The latter term is properly restricted to the 
descendants of a legendary Kais, one of the first apostles of Islim (ob. 662), from whom, 
through his three sons, Sarabin, Batin, and Gurgdsht, are supposed to spring the 277 A%han 
khels (tribes) proper. Of non-Afghan khels there are reckoned 128, making 405 Pukhtina 
khels altogether. Of these 105 are Sarabini (from Sarabin), 77 from Batin, in two divisions ; 
Batanai 25, and Matti 25, these last being known as Ghilzae ; 223 from Guigiisht, also in two 
divisions ; Gurgiishtai 95, and Karaldnai 128, these last being the non-Afghan or Pukhtina khels 
as above. The true Afghans occupy mainly the western, central, and north-eastern districts — 
Herat, Sistin, Kandahar, and the Kibul basin, as far east as Peshiwar. The non-Afghans, 
or Pathins proper, are found almost exclusively in the Sufed-Koh and Sulimin highlands, 
as far south as the Kaura or Vahova Pass, opposite Dera Fateh Khan. A line drawn from 
about the paralled of Mooltan, through this point, westwards to Thai through the middle of the 
Derajit, will very nearly form the boundary in this direction of the Pathins on the north, 
and the Balochis and Brahuis on the south. This relative geographical area suggests a possi- 
ble explanation of the distinction between the two great divisions of the race. From their 
more westerly position it is obvious that the true Afghans must have been the first to adopt 
Isllbn, and*they may have thus come to look upon their pagan brethren of the Sulimin high- 
lands * as Kifirs, undeserving to rank as genuine Afghans, the distinction thus originated 
naturally surviving their subsequent conversion. 

In the subjoined table an attempt is made to give, for probably the first time, a complete 
classification of all the main sections of both divisions, with their chief sub-branches, approxi- 
mate number of khels, geographical area, and population. 

Table of Afghan and Pathan Tribes. 



Main Sections. 


Total 
No. of 
Rhel5. 


Popula- 
.ion. 


Chief Subdivisions. 


Geographical Position. 


I. Durani or Abdali .. 

a. Khugiani 

3. Ghilzae or GhiUi .. 

4. YOsaEote 

5. MohmandxaeorMah- 


»35 

3a 
140 

130 
63 


8oO|Ooo 

50,000 
600,000 

700,000 
40,000 


X. Zm»( :— Ponalzae, Alikio- 

»HA Banuczae. 
a. Paw/^:— Murzae, Alizae, 

Vaziri; KlSkbOn; Shexzad .. 

X. TWnuf :->Ohtak, Sakzae, 

Tunzae. 
a. -fitf mi» ;— Chin, Chalo, Za- 

bar, All, Suliman. 

X. Mandan i—MvcMSi. Utman 
a. K<*«/:~l8a. llias, Mali, 

Rani. 
Tarakzae; Halim ; Baizae; 

Khwai ; Utman. 


Mainly in the tract between Herat and Kandahar, 
400 miles long, 80 to xso broad ; also in 
Kabulistan. 

Chiefly in the Jalalabad district, between Snrlch-ab 
and Kabul rivers. Seem to have been origi- 
nally a branch of the Panjpao Duranis. 

In the country bounded N. by the Kabul river, 
E. by the Suliman Mts., W. by the Gulkoh 
Mts. S. by Kakt-i-Ghilzae and Poti ; 300 
miles long, 100 miles broad. A branch at 
Khubes and Nurmanshahr, Persia. 

The hUls N. of Peshawar district and in the 
Yusa&ae division of the Peshawar district. 

The hills N. W. of Peshawar between Kabul and 
Swal rivers ; chief town Lalpflxa. 



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Outlying Independent States,— Continued. 
Table of Afghan aud Pathan Tribes, — Continued. 



175. 



Main Sections. 



ls.| ^<^ 



Khels. ^<^°- 



Chief Subdivisions. 



Geographical Position. 



6. Kakaxs.. 

7. Khataks 

8. UtmanKhel 

9. Bangash 
10. Afrldis 

zx. Orakzaeor Warukzae 

za. Shinwaris or Shan- 
waris 

Z3. Tiraes .. 

Z4. Jadons or Gaduns.. 

Z5. Tarins .. 
z6. Povindahs 



Z7. Vaztris oit Wazlris . 



45 
70 
33 
90 
z8o 

70 
30 



z8. Shitanis 


Z9. 


Babars .. 


«x 


Turis .. 


2Z. 


jAJis .. 


32. 


Zaemdkhts 


a3. 


Dawaris.. 


a4« 


Khostwals 


as. 


Mangals 


z6. 


Jadrans.. 


27. 


Ushtaranas 


28. Esots .. 



39. Jafars 



3ao 

Z30 

»5 

Sa 
SO 



200,000 

zoo,ooo 

80|0oo 

100,000 
90,000 

30,000 
50,000 

7iSoo 

5,000 

20,000 
5P»ooo 

250,000 



30,000 
4,000 



33 


25,000 


6 


20,000 


xo 


X2/XX> 


X4 


25,000 


, 


x5,ooo 


4a 


8,000 



5,000 



S,ooo 



"i790 3.52x,ooo 



Jala; Musa; Kadi; Usmanj 

Khidar; Abdula. 
Tari ; Taraki ; Bolak 

Asil ; Shamo ; Mandal ; Ali .. 

Miranzae ; Baizae ; Samalzae 

Kuki; MalikdTa; Kambar; 
Kamr; Zakha; Aka. 

Daolat ; Utman ; Sipah ; Isb- 
mail ; Rabia ; Lsa. 

Sangu ; Ali Sher ; Sipai ; 
Babur; Lohaigae. 



Shibdwani ; Seh Pat 
Salar ; Matkhwa ; Mansur 



^im:— Shadi, Marpani, Las- 
rani. 
r<>r;— Batch, Haikal, Mali 

Lohani ; Nasar \ Niazi ; 

Daotani ; Kharoti : Miani. 



X. Utmanl — Mahmud, Ibrahim 

2. Ahmad: — Shin, Sirki, Umur 

3. Mahsud: — Ali, Shahman 

4. Gurbaz ; 5. Lali 

1. CA«tf :— Yahra, Bairam .. 

2. Sen : — ^Ahmad, Yahia 

3. U6a: — Ahmad, Manu 
Mahsud ; Bahadin ; Musa ; 

Ahmad ; Mardan. 

Gundi; Ali; Mula; Mastu; 

Firor ; Mam. 
Maidan ; Danni ; Isteah ; Al- 

gaih ; Ada ; Lehwanni ; 

Ali ; Ahmed ; Bian ; 

Shamu. 



X. ITAwatdad :^BahsikarfJiasn 
2. MaAamad :—Wsiti^ Manatu, 
Mandan. 

1. Ta//;— Haidar, Idak 

2. Malai: — Darpa, Amzani. 
Ishmail; Matun; Mandu 

Shamal. 
Lafkwar :—FsLits\^e\ Agar, 
Andaa, Miral, Khajuri, 
Zab. 



1. Gogol i—ShaiiOt Musa, Ako, 

Shamo. 

2. Ahmad: — Ibrahim, 
Mashar. 



Kadr, 



I. Noh .-—Ahmad, Zado, Jahan, 

Chado. 
a. Mlia/:- Ado, Khidr, Pam- 

da, Khadi. 
Ramdani ; Mohra ; Rajali ; 

Kawani. 



Extreme S»E. comer of Afghanistan proper, 

S.E. part Peshawar district, and S. and E. of 
Kobat ; some also now amongst the Yusafzaes. 

The hills N. of Peshawar between the Mohmands 
and Yflsafzaes. 

Miranzae, Kohat, and K{lram valleys ; said to be 

originally from Sistan. 
Lower and easternmost spurs Sufed Koh Mts., 

W. and S. of the PeshSwar district, with Bara. 

valley and pans of Chura and Tira. valleys. 
The Tira highlands, N. and W. of Kohat. 

Parts of Khaibar Mts., E. valleys of Sufed Koh 

and on borders of Bajawar. 
Note,— 10, 11, and la^ are collectively known 
as the KhaibarU. 

In the Kot valley of the Shinwari country, but 

distinct from them. 
S. side Mahaban Mts., and Hazara district, 

Peshawar ; said to be Kakars originally, though 

now with the Yflsafzaes, 
N. frontier Baloch province Kachi. 

From head of Gomal S. to head of Lora river 
along \y. Suliman range, their territory form- 
ing a triangle hemmed m between the Ghilzaes^ 
Vaziris and Kakars. 

Suliman Mts., from Thai to Gomal Pass,. 3o*-32* 
N. lat. A branch now with the Khugianis (2.) 



Suliman Mts. from the .Sbekh Haidar Pass- 
southwards to the Ramak. 

In the Koh-i-Daman of the Dera Ismail Khan 
district, opposite the San|pu>and Dahina passes r 
same stoclc as the Shiranis. 

Kuram valley. (See NoU under ax.) 

Kuram. valley, mostly about river Ariob, and from 
the Shutar Gardan to the Paiwar pass. 

Note. — ao. and ai. are not regarded as true 
Pathans, being traditionally sprung of twa 
Mughal brothers. Tor and JajL Edwardes says 
they are Khatar Hindkis from Rawalpindi. 

In the hills between Miranzae and Kflnun. 



Dawari valley, 32" s/— 33* 7' N. laL 

Khost valky, adjoining Kuram and 
xt. 

jhi 1 
Zurmat;.! 



Upper 

Zurmat, 

On Laghi river, Kuram valley, and parts of 
supposed to be of Mughal descent; 



East of Zurmat,. E. side (^ Suliman Mts. 

The hills opi>osite extreme S. part Dera Ismail. 
Khan district. Are disowned by the Afghans, 
though apparently of Lohani (Povindah) stodu 

The hills west of Dera Ismail Khan. Are said 
to be of Kakar origin, though now distinct ; 
Troglodytes. 

Between the Bflj si>ur of the Suliman Mts. and 
the Bozdar Bilochis. 



Of the main sections in the above table^ Nos. i. to 12. inclusive, are recognised as true 
Afghans, and of these, Nos. i. and 3. (Durdnis and Ghilzaes) are by far the most important and 
influential. Since the time of Nadir Shah, the Durdnis have been the ruling tribe, the Popalzae 
division till 1818, the Barakzae from that year to the present time. They were formerly called 



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176 Outlying Independent States,— Con/inued. 

the Abdali or Avdali, a name which has been traced to the Ephthalites and Abdela of the 
Byzantine writers of the sixth century. But it was changed to Ehirkni from the title of Dorri- 
Durin, " Pearl of the Age," assumed by the Sardar Ahmad Khan, of the Saddozae branch of 
the Popalzaes, when be usurped the supreme power at Kandahar on the death of Nadir Shah, 
in 1747. The seat of government was removed from Kandahar to KsLbul by his successor 
Taimiin Shah (ob. 1793), and this dynasty became extinct in 18 18, when it was succeeded by 
the Barakzaes in K^bul, though various descendants of Ahmad Khan continued and still con- 
tinue to assert their claims to the sovereignty in Herat. 

Although mentioned in the national genealogies, the right of the Ghilzaes to be considered 
as Pukhtiins at all, much less genuine Afghans, has been questioned. There certainly seems to 
be a flaw in their escutcheon, and they themselves, (who always call themselves Ghilji^ and not 
Ghil'zae,) claim Tflrki descent The national tradition is that they entered the country in the 
tenth century under a certain Sabaktagin, of the Kilich Tdrki tribe ** anciently situated on the 
upper course of the Jaxartes"* (Syr Darya). But however this be, they are now entirely assimi- 
lated in habits, dress, religion, and speech, to the other Afghan tribes, with the exception of a 
few who are still nomads. 

None of the other sections call for special remark except the Povindahs, who are at once 
agriculturists, traders, and warriors, their armed caravans yeaiiy fighting their way through the 
intervening hostile tribes down to the markets of the Panjdb and Sindh. The name is suppos- 
ed to be derived from the Persian Parwindoj a bale of goods, and seems to be indiffierently applied 
to the LcAanis, Waziris, Kdkars, Ghilzaes, or any other tribe temporarily or permanently forming 
part of this singular ^ trades' union." By far the most important section are the Lohanis, the 
oldest and most numerous members of the association, and one of the most im>mising elements 
for the future pacific settlement and material prospects of the country. 

Physically the Afghans may be described as, on the whole, a fine race. Their featuresf 
though often coarse and ugly, are reg^ar in the European sense of the term, with the occa- 
sional Jewish cast above remarked upon. Type, long, oval face, arched nose, head mesati- 
cephalous, that is, intermediate between the round and the long, measured horizontally, with 
cranial index 79 ^ fair complexion, thick beard, hair and eyes generally black, but light blue or 
grey eyes and brown hair common amongst the Rohillas,3 as the Sulimin highlanders are 
often collectively called. 

The great bulk of the people are Sunnites, which is one of the causes of their profound 
aversion to the Persians, who are mainly of the Shiah sect. Yet the nobles and upper classes, 
especially amongst the Durinis, usually converse and always correspond in Persian. The 
consequence is that the Pukhtu, or national language, has remained a somewhat rude idiom, 
seldom employed in literature, and in refined society regarded as little better than a provincial 
patois. Its importance philologically is considerable, for though usually grouped with the 
Iranian branch of the Aryan family. Dr. Ernest Trumpp (Grammar, 1873), gives it a more 
ndependent position, as intermediate between the Iranicand Indie, while Prof. Haug, of Munich^ 
now regards it as a separate member of the family. It is very harsh and spoken with consider- 
able dialectic variety everywhere in Afghanistan proper, except the Hazarajat, and also in the 
Peshiwar district of British India. The most marked dialects seem to be the Kandahari, Diri, 
Tirhai, Peshiwari, Khaibari, Tami, Vaztri, and Ushtarini. The Pashae and Laghmllni, some- 
times included in the list, are not Pukhtu at all, or even Iranian, but distinctly Sanskritic, 
closely allied to the Siah Posh and KohistinL 

I H. W. Bdlew, "Afghanistan and the Afghans,** 1879. 

3 Barnard Davis, " Thesanrus Cranionun.** 

3 From rM^the Persian ^A—mountain, whence also Rohilkhand, in Northern India. 



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Outlying Independent States^ — Continued. 177 

BALUCHISTAN^ or the country of His Highness the Khan of Kelat. This country lies 
south of Afghanistan, extending on the south to the Arabian Sea, on the east to the frontier 
of Sind, and on the west to the frontier of Persia. It extends from latitude 24' 53' to 30° 2cf N., 
and from longitude 61* o' to 69** 45' E., its greatest length on the north from east to west being 
about 550 miles, and greatest breadth north to south about 380 miles. Its area is about 160,000 
square miles. Its coast line is remarkably regular but craggy and not much elevated ; to- 
wards the interior, however, there is rapid elevation. On the coast there are several well-shel- 
tered roadsteads, particularly Sonmiani bay and Chaubar bay, but no good harbours. 

Much of this country is unexplored, in describing it therefore only an approximation to 
accuracy can be attained. It comprises seven divisions or provinces, z/i>., Cutch-Gcmdava and 
country of the Maris and Bugtis on the north-east, Sarawan on the noxi^^y Jhalawar on the 
cast, Lusy on the south-east, Makran occupying an extensive length of country on the south, 
Kohistan or the mountain country on the west, and Kelat^ in which is situated the capital 
of the same name. The interior of the country is rugged, and barren. Its eastern side is 
crossed from north to south by the Hala and Khirtari ranges of hills, which are a conti- 
nuation of the Suliman range, but there are no very lofty eminences. The whole country 
is described as a maze of mountains, except on the north-west where it becomes part of 
the desert. The direction of these mountain chains are almost wholly imknown with excep- 
tion of a few of the principal ranges. One vast chain stretches along the entire coast, from 
the vicinity of Ras Jyuni on the west, to the river Purali on the east. Parallel to this range, 
and at the distance of about 70 miles north from it, another well defined chain intersects 
Makran and joins with the Sarawani mountains near Bela. A third parallel range, called the 
Wushuti or Mue mountains, about 1 10 miles further north from the last described chain, forms 
part of the northern boundary of Baluchistan, separating it from the great southern desert 
of Afghanistan. The other remarkable chains are the Bushkurd mountains, about 240 miles in 
length, and the Sarawani mountains stretching in a north-east direction. 

The rivers of Baluchistan are the Bholan, Rodbat, Lora, Shirinab and Mula in the north, 
the Hubb, Sinamani, Marwar, Nari, Umach and Purali in the east, the Shadi, Mokula, Bha- 
sul, Ghish, and Gasbastan in the south, and the Dasht, Rakshan, Bhado, Gwargo^ Nehing and 
Mashkhid in the west ; with the exception of the Hubb they all dry up, or are lost in the earth 
during the dry weather, in the wet season, however, they are destructive mountain torrents.' 
Few of them flow through regular and well-defined channels. Along the whole 500 miles of 
coast which Baluchistan possesses, there is no stream which cannot in dry weather be forded. 

Part of Baluchistan to the north-west consists of a sandy desert quite impassable in 
summer owing to the sandstorms, when the wind is so scorching as utterly to destroy animal 
life, and throughout the whole country there is a great deficiency of water. 

There are numerous passes in Baluchistan, of which the Bholan and Mula are the chief. 
A Railway is now in course of construction, starting from Sukkur station of the Indus Valley 
State Railway, to Quetta vid Sibi, to be carried eventually to Kandahar ; this line is now open 
to a distance about twenty miles beyond Sibi. (See Bombay Presidency.) 

The crest of the Bholan Pass is about 5,793 above the sea ; there is little descent on the 
western side as it merely reaches the top of Uie plateau ; the roadway is difficult, part of the 
road being cut through high perpendicular hills ; the total length is about 54 miles, and the 
average ascent 90 feet in a mile. The whole of the low country before reaching the pass 
entrance near Dadar is barren, sandy and extremely hot in the summer. 

The climate of Baluchistan is extreme. The cold during winter is exceedingly intense, 
snow lying on the ground for two months in the winter even in the fertile valleys, while in 
summer, the heat is overpowering on the lower grounds. Some parts of Makran are said to be 
■the hottest localities in Asia. In February and March a good deal of rain falls, after which 
the dry season commences and lasts till September. 

The country is said to be rich in minerals. Copper and iron especially being met with in 
large quantities, and gold, silver, lead, antimony, saltpetre and sulphur are[also to be found. There 
are mud volcanoes at Lus near a place where iron ore is worked. The soil is not in genera 



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178 Outlying Independent States, — Continued. 

fertile, but patient industry has rendered the plains and valleys productive in wheat, barley 
the millets and pulses of various kinds, oil seeds, cotton, rice, indigo and tobacco. The sugar 
cane grows chiefly on the plains of Lus and the date in Makran. Vegetables of every kind 
are abundant, and the gardens and orchards in the vicinity of the towns produce the finest 
fruits ; on the coast fish are caught in great quantities. 

The manufactures of Baluchistan are unimportant, being confined to a few matchlocks and 
other fire-arms at Kelat. 

The inhabitants are divided into two great branches, the Baluchis and the Brahuis, differing 
in language, figure and manners. The Baluchis are tall, well-formed and of dark complexion 
the Brahuis, so-called from the words bah-ruh-i (on the waste), are much shorter and broader 
with hair and beards frequently brown. They are most numerous in the province of Jhalawar 
and in the north and west. They have great physical strength, and are generally more peaceful 
than the Baluchis. Both races are pastoral, hospitable, brave, excellent marksmen and capable 
of enduring much fatigue, and belong to the Sunni sect of Mahomedans. Neither possesses a 
written language and their early histories have not been preserved. Polygamy is universal, 
few however have more than two wives, some of the chiefs have four. Wives are obtained by 
purchase, and paid for in sheep, &c., and a man is expected to marry the widow of a deceased 
brother. On the occurence of a death, the body is watched for three nights by friends and 
relatives, and the time is passed in feasting. 

The government is despotic, the Khan having unlimited power over life, person and pro- 
perty, his rule being confined for the most part to the province immediately around his capital, 
the greater part of the country being held by tribal chiefs, over whom he has little or no control* 
though they furnish contingents of men in case of war, and pay tribute, an obligation which is 
often evaded. The revenues are estimated at upwards of Rs. 3,00,000. 

The chief towns of Baluchistan are Kelat, the capital, about 6,000 feet above the sea, Bela 
or Lus near the coast, Dadar, Gandava, Mustang, Nushki, Sarawan, Kej, Pasni, Dera^ Son- 
meani and Quetta, the inferior towns are Chahgeh, Diz, Tump, Sami and Kharan. 

The languages spoken are Baluchi and Persian. 

BHUTAN,— V^ry little is known of this territory which lies to\he east of Sikkim, between 
the Jalpaiguri and Goalpara districts of Bengal and Assam, and the mountains that form the 
southern slope of the Himalayas. It extends from east to west 230 miles, with a breadth of 
about 120 miles, lying between latitudes 26° 18' and 28" 2' N. and longitudes 88" 32' and about 
92** 30' E. The eastern limits are not certainly known ; the area is about 19,000 square miles. 
It is crossed by two ranges of mountain land parallel to the great mountain chain beyond ; 
one (the nearest), 8,000 feet high generally, with occasional peaks as much as 16,000 feet, 
the other, more distant and less lofty. Between the Himalayas and the first range is a 
high table-land, too bleak and barren to be habitable, except at the foot of the first range where 
are most of the principal towns. To the east of the second range the land is level, and south- 
wards of the lower range are the Duars, tracts of country of extraordinary fertility, whose 
produce once formed the chief means of subsistence of the people. These Duars were ceded 
to the British in 1866 in return for an annual payment of money. On the north Bhutan is 
bounded by Tibet, and on the east by tracts inhabited by uncivilized mountain tribes. The 
scenery of Bhutan is scarcely to be equalled by that of any other country, at one view may 
be seen rugged barren hills and valleys covered with luxuriant vegetation, rushing mountain 
torrents and gentle streams, dense forests and sunny slopes, placid lakes and steep precipices, 
and vast ranges covered with eternal snow, while in regard to climate, the cold of Siberia, the 
heat of Afirica, and the pleasant warmth of Italy, may all be experienced in a day's journey. 

The soil produces rice, wheat and millet in abundance, and game of all kinds abounds 
in the forests — sheep, ponies and a hardy breed of homed cattle are reared. The roads are mere 
tracks through ravines which become torrents in the rainy season. The population, estimated at 
about 20,000, consists of three classes, the priests, the chiefs or Penlows, who are the governing 
class, and the cultivators. 

The country is governed nominally by a person called the Dharm Raja, supposed to be a 



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Outlying Independent States,— Continued, 179 

divinity in human shape, but really by the Deb Raja, who is elected by the Penlows every thrfee 
years from their own number. Buddhism is the religion of the country and the inhabitants 
are hardy and vigorous, with dark skins, and high cheek bones. 

Bhutan trades with all the neighbouring countries but chiefly with Thibet, Bengal and 
Assam, in horses, cloth, musk, fly- whisks, walnuts, oranges and Indian madder, receiving in 
exchange woollen cloths, cottons, asafoetida, spices, tea, gold, silver and embroideries. The reve- 
nues of the country are usually paid in articles of produce and merchandise. 

The chief towns are Punakha or Dosen the capital, on the left bank of the Bugni river, 
and ninety-six miles east-north-east from Darjeeling ; Tasichozong and Faro on the river Guda- 
da, and Toungsu on the road from Assam to Lhassa. The other towns are Wandipur, Ghassa 
and Murichom. Punakha is a place of great natural strength. 

The Towang Bhutias occupy the southern slopes of the Himalayas to the eastward of 
Bhutan proper, of which state they are independent. A considerable trade between Lhassa 
and Assam is carried on through them. The Towangs are quiet and friendly. Eastward of 
the Towangs are the Char Duar and Thebengea Bhutias, two small and well-behaved clans. 
The territory of the Towang Bhutias extends to the river Rowta, that of the Char Duar Bhutias 
from the Rowta to the Ghaben river. 

A few Bhutias inhabit the Eastern Duars portion of the Goalpara district of Assam, and re- 
semble in every respect their countrymen in the Bhutan hills. 

The language spoken by the Bhutias is said to be a dialect of the Thibetan, more or less 
blended with words and idioms of the countries on which their own territory touches. In their 
religious observances, the most remarkable circumstance is the noise with which they are 
accompanied. The instruments used are clarionets sometimes formed of silver and brass, but 
generally of wood with reed pipes, horns, shells, cymbals^ drums and gongs. 

The garments of the people consist of a long loose robe which wraps round the body, and 
is secured in its position by a leather belt round the waist. A legging of broadcloth is 
attached to a shoe made generally of buffaloe hide. No Bhutia ever travels during the winter 
without protecting his legs and feet against the effects of the snow, by putting on these boots, 
which are secured by a garter tied under the knee. A cap made of fur or coarse woolen 
cloth completes the habiliment, and the only variation observable is the substitution of a 
cloth for a woolen robe during the summer months of the year. The diet of the great body of the 
people is the most miserable it is possible to conceive ; they are restricted to the refuse of 
wretched crops of unripe wheat and barley, and their food consists chiefly of cakes made from 
these grains very imperfectly ground. The food of the superior classes consists of the flesh 
of goats, swine and cattle, and of rice imported from the Duars. The mode of preparing their 
food is most inartiflcial and rude, with little attention to cleanlines and still less to the quality 
of the meat they consume. They are very fond of tea and use it in large quantities. All 
classes are very much addicted to the use of intoxicating liquors. Their amusements are 
almost entirely confined to archery and quoits, and their character seldom appears to greater 
advantage than when engaged in these exercises. The character of the Bhutias, by the 
nature of their institutions, stands low in the social scale. Every element of deterioration 
is comprised in their government both secular and spiritual. Their energies are paralysed by 
the insecurity of property, their morals are degraded, and their numbers reduced by the 
unnatural system of polyandry and the excessive prevalence of monastic institutions. 

KASHMIR or CASHMERE. — ^A name now given to an extensive tract of country, 
reaching from the Punjab on the south and west, to Thibet on the north and east, its extreme 
length being about 400 miles and its breadth 280 miles. The boundary of this territory en the 
north and north-east is undefined, or unknown. The country includes the valley of Kashmir 
proper, 5,300 to 6,000 feet above the sea, Ladak or Leh, Baltistan or little Thibet, and several 
provinces of smaller importance, viz : Jummoo Bhadrawar, Gilghit, Kistwar, Naoshera, Punch, 
Rukshu and others, and is almost entirely mountainous. In the southern portion, the mountain 
sides are clothed with forests of cedar and pine, but further northwards towards Thibet, there 
are large tracts destitute even of a trace of vegetation. The scenery of the mountains is in 



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i8o Outlying Independent States, — Continued. 

the hij^best, degree picturesque. The grandeur and splendour of Kashmir scenery results from 
the sublimity of the huge enclosing mountains, the beauty of the various gorges, the numerous 
lakes and fine streams, rendered often more striking by cataracts, the luxuriance and variety of 
the forest trees and the rich and varied vegetation of the lower ground. 

The valley of Kashmir is an expansion of part of the valley of the Jhelum, here called 
the Behat. It is an oval plain, 4,500 square miles in area, surrounded on all sides by lofty 
mountains, whose passes on the north side are not less than 10,000 feet above the sea. The 
actual plain or bottom of the valley is about seventy miles long and thirty to forty miles wide, 
and is 5,300 feet above the sea. The river Jhelum flows through it in a winding and tranquil, 
navigable stream, at one time washing the base of the hills on one side and then crossing to the 
other. On the rising of the river in summer, when the snow melts on the mountains, the whole 
plain would be inundated, but for a system of dykes called bunds placed along the course of the 
stream. The river expands into lakes, one of which, the Wulur is about twenty miles long by nine 
broad, and another near the city of Srinagar the capital, as long, but of only half the breadth. 
The soil of the valley is most fertile and produces com of all kinds, fruits, nuts and flowers. 

The inhabitants of the valley are chiefly Mahomedans of the Sunni class, but in the sur- 
rounding country they exhibit a mixture of the Hindu and the Tartar, the Tartar characteris- 
tics being more marked as we approach the mountains, the dress, customs and even the religion 
changing gradually with the changes of the physical features of the country. The language of 
the country is Cashmiri^ derived from the Sanskrit and the Persian. 

The climate of the country though subject to extremes of temperature, is on the whole 
salubrious, and is divided into the four seasons as elsewhere ; but the periodical rains of India 
do not reach so far into the mountains. March and April are somewhat rainy, May and June 
are dry and fine, July and August are the hottest part of the year and are marked by thunder- 
storms. The winter lasts four months, and the ground is then covered with snow. Earth- 
quakes are frequent. 

The most celebrated manufiaicture of Kashmir is that of shawls, the wool used in their 
manufacture being of two kinds, one obtained from the tame, the other from the wild goat, 
wild sheep and other wild animals, the fine dovm growing next to the skin alone is taken. The 
demand for these shawls has from various causes greatly fallen off of late years, and is still on 
the wane. Otto of roses is also made in large quantity and of the finest quality. Fire-arms, 
saddlery, leather, papier-mache, lacquered ware and paper are largely manufactured, and 
the artizans employ extraordinary pains in their manufacture, producing with their rude tools, 
work of extaordinary beauty and excellence. 

The chief towns areKashmu- or Srinagar and Jummoo, the two capitals, Skardo on the upper 
Indus, Islamabad, Kishtwar, Leh, Astor, Naoshera, Shahabad, Punch, Shapiyon and Gilghit 

Golab Sing, the father of the present prince, was put in possession of the whole country 
by the British in 1846, to whom it had been ceded in 1845 ^Y the Sikhs, who held possession 
of it since 1819, when they took it from the Afghans who had conquered it in 1752. 

Numerous passes lead into the Kashmir territory and valley, many of which are practi- 
cable for horses, but none for wheeled carriages, the principal among which may be mentioned, 
the Nabog pass on the eastern frontier ; the Banihal pass 9,700 feet high, on the southern 
frontier ; the Baramulla pass, westwards, or Punch pass 8,500 feet high, on the western fitmtier ; 
Baramulla pass, southwards, and the Pu- Panjal pass, 11,500 feet high, through which the 
road from Bhimbar goes. {See Punjab Province native states.) 

MANIPUR is a rugged mountainous country south-east of Assam, between Assam and the 
Burman empire. It is intersected by two great valleys, one on the west and the other through 
the centre of the territory. In the central valley, rice, pulse, sugar-cane and tobacco grow 
luxuriantly and the tea plant flourishes throughout. The soil is very fruitful, but there is little 
cultivation. There are several brine springs in the territory. Iron ore is found and there are 
manufactures of iron and copper, the latter being chiefly worked as bell-metal for drinking 
and other vessels, as well as coins. The territory is 125 miles in length from north to south, 
and about 100 miles in breadth. There are no public works, except a road from Cachar to 



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Outlying Independent States, — Continued. i8i 

the capital,. Imphal. The Manipuris, though Hindus of the Kshattriya or warrior caste 
are not of Aryan descent, their origin is locally ascribed to the union of two powerful tribes 
one Naga and the other Kuki, which had for a long time contended for the possession of the 
Manipur valleys. They are tall, well made and of a fair complexion. In character they 
are cunning, and treacherous in dealing with those who are not of their own race, but on the 
other hand they seem to behave with great honesty to one another, and their fidelity to their 
leaders is remarkable ; they first became Hindus about a century ago. The country is 
regarded as neutral territory between British India and Burmah, and its boundaries on the 
cast or Burmah side, are quite unsettled. {See Assam Province native states.) 

NEPAL. — This independent state extends from Latitude 26' 25' to 30** 17' N. and from 
Longitude 80* 15' to 88" 15' E., and is bounded on the north by Thibet ; on the east by Sikkim 
and the British district of Darjeeling ; on the south by the British districts of Basti, Gorakh- 
pur, Chumparun, Mozuiferpore, Durbhunga, Bhagalpur and Purneah ; on the south-west by 
Oudh, and on the west by the British district of Kumaun. Its length from east to west is 
about 550 miles, and its breadth about 160 miles, having an area of about 84,500 square 
miles. The principal territorial divisions are Murang, Chaynpur, Makmani, Khatang, Nepal 
proper, Gurkha, Khachi, and Malibum. The territory exhibits great diversity of surface 
and climate, and corresponding differences of vegetable and animal life ; it is traversed by 
several considerable streams, and is divided into five parallel zones. The principal rivers 
which traverse Nepal, are the Kamali, Gandak, Trisul-Ganga, Bori-Gandak, Kosi, Gogra 
and Bagmati, most of them rising in the highlands of Thibet. Along its southern border 
extends the Taraiy a long narrow strip of marshy forest and jungle, about twenty miles broad, 
beyond this is a forest region producing a great variety of valuable timber^ Beyond 
this again the country becomes more hilly and continues to rise in terraces. Still further 
north, these begin to assume a mountainous character^ beyond and above which rises the 
great Snowy Range, where are found Mount Everest (29,002 feet), Dhawalagiri (26,862 feet), 
Gosainthan, Kanchinjunga (28,156 feet), and others, the highest peaks in the world. Among 
the mountains are several inhabited valleys, varying in height from 3,000 to 6,000 feet above 
the plains of Bengal. Of these the valley of Nepal proper is perhaps the largest, being 
twelve miles long, and nine miles broad. It is bounded on all sides by lofty mountains, and its 
undulating surface is covered with a rich expanse of cultivated land, watered by numer- 
ous winding streams, and studded with villages and towns. The valley has the appear- 
ance of a lake bed, and Hindu records describe it as having been so at some former 
time. 

The climate of Nepal, notwithstanding its low latitude, from its great and varying eleva- 
tions above the level of the sea, is characterised by the widest extremes in different parts, and 
all degrees of temperature, from the cold of Siberia to the burning heat of the African desert, 
may be experienced in a day or twos' journey. Generally, however, the climate resembles in 
some respects that of southern Europe. • The seasons are those of Upper India, but the rains 
commence earlier and set in from the south-east. In the Tarai, putrid fever is common, and 
fatal from the middle of March to the middle of November. 

The mineral productions of this country are varied and important. Copper and iron mines 
are worked in the hills, and lead, arsenic and building stone abound. Mines of sulphur are 
said to be numerous, but little is known about them. The manufactures include utensils of 
copper, brass and iron, the casting of bells and the fabrication of cutlery, ordnance, guns and 
swords, also coarse cotton-cloth and paper. Iron, copper, ivory, timber, hides, rice, ginger, 
wax, honey, cardamoms and fruits are exported. 

The revenue is said to be about 43,00,000 Rupees, and the population, about 3,000,000, con- 
sists of Gurichas, Newars, Bhutias and aboriginal mountain tribes. The Gurkhas are the ruling 
race and are Hinduized Tartars, the Newars, chiefly confined to Nepal proper, are agricultur- 
ists, traders and artizans, they have Chinese features and are also of Tartar origin, the Bhutias 
inhabit the higher ranges adjoining Thibet. All classes drink spirituous liquors to excess, and 
most of the domestic servants are slaves. The language spoken by the Gurkhas is a mountain 



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1 82 Ocean Islands. 

dialect of Hindi called Prabaiiya; the dialect of the Newars is peculiar to themselves ; 
Hindustani, however, is generally understood. 

The chief towns are Katmandu, the capital, 4,784ft. in elevation and head-quarters of the 
Resident, having a population of about 30^000 souls, Lalita-Patan, Bhatgaon, Gurkha^ Jamla and 
Makwanpur. This country is almost entirely unexplored, owing to the watchful vig^ilance and 
jealousy manifested by the ruling race in this respea. The British Government, practically has 
no influence over Nepal, and except the Resident at Katmandu, no Englishman can enter, much 
more explore the country, and no survey can be executed, nor is the exact nature of the relations 
between Nepal and China correctly known, though it is said, a mission with presents proceeds 
to China every five years. 

SIKKIM. — ^A small mountainous tract, between Nepal and Bhutan, which last it resembles 
in its physical features, and its productions are similar. On its northern frontier are some of 
the highest peaks of the Himalayan chain. It is about sixty-six miles in length from north 
to south, and about fifty-two in breadth. The population consists of Murmis, Lepchas, 
Bhutias and Limbus. The Rajah resides at the capital, Tamlang, from November to May, 
when he moves to Chumbi, on the Thibetan side of the range. Sikkim is allowed £100 
to ;£200 a year by the Government at Lhassa, and the allowance from the British Govern- 
ment has been increased to £1^200 a year, on the condition that every facility should be 
given to trade with Thibet. {See Bengal native states.) 

HILL TIPPERAH. — A mountainous tract bounded on the north by the British districts 
of Sylhet and Cachar, on the east by Burmah, on the south by the British districts of Chitta- 
gong and Chittagong Hill Tracts, and on the west by British Tipperah. It is about 130 
miles in length from north to south, and about fifty miles in breadth, and covered with dense 
bamboo jungle infested with wild animals. The inhabitants are called Kukis, and cultivate 
rice, cotton, Indian com, indigo, yams, beans and other vegetables. The soil is exceedingly 
fertile and the tea plant grows wild. The government is in the hands of a number of chiefe 
who levy tribute on their dependents at will, themselves paying an annual tribute to the 
Maharajah of the State. {See Bengal native states.) 



OCEAN ISLANDS. 

Near the Malabar^ Coromandel and Burmah Coasts. 

ANDAMAN ISLANDS AND COCOS.—A chain of four large and several smaller is- 
lands, of volcanic origin, about 200 miles west of the coast of the Tenasserim province of British 
Burmah, extending north and south parallel to the coast, between the loth and the 15th degrees 
of north Latitude, and the 92nd and 94th degrees of east Longitude, of a total length of about 
200 miles, and an area of about 2,700 square miles. In this extent, north and south, are in- 
cluded the island of Preparis, uninhabited, and the islands of the Cow and Calf, which by 
some are excluded from this group, also the Cocos and Narcondam. They consist of a 
mountain ridge, rising at Saddle Peak to 2,400 feet, the escarped side being towards the east 
and sloping to the west. The main portion is about 140 miles in length, but divided into three 
parts by very narrow straits. Dangerous coral reefs surround the group, and dense tropical 
forest, coming down to the water's edge, covers the greater part of their surface. They are 
peopled by dwarfed and woolly headed savages of the Papuan race, who have no fixed habita- 
tion, no pursuit, and no government, smearing themselves with mud and ochre as a protection 
from insects, and manifesting the most hostile disposition on every attempt to establish inter- 
course with them. There are several excellent harbours, the best of them being Port Blair, 
where a penal colony for all India was established in 1868, when the whole group was formally 
annexed and placed under an officer now styled the 'Chief Commissioner and Superintendent of 
the Andaman and Nicobar islands,' in direct correspondence with the Government of India. 
These islands are singularly interesting for their zoology, several species of large land animals 
being apparently confined to them. They have recently yielded a new large sized chimpanzee 



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Ocean Islands, — Continued. 183 

and a new species of hog. The population of the entire group, excluding the convict settle- 
ment, is about 3,000, and is fast dying out 

The four largest islands of the group, are named respectively, North, Middle, South and 
Little Andaman ; Middle Andaman, the largest, being about 60 miles long and 20 broad ; South 
Andaman, 50 miles long and 23 broad. The last, about thirty miles in length, is separated from 
the main group of three by a strait called " Duncan Passage." Port Blair, 800 miles from 
Calcutta, is in the South Andaman, and is reached by a steamer from thence in four days. 
Mount Harriet, at the foot of which Earl Mayo was assassinated, is in the North Andaman. 
This mountain rises some 1,200 feet above sea level. Jungle fever is common here, and it is 
not safe to sleep on the lower slopes of the mount, which has a good bungalow at the summit, 
with a good road to it. The North Andaman is deeply indented by bays, clothed with the 
most lovely scenery. The chief government buildings and barracks are on Ross island, and 
there are extensive saw mills at Chatham island. The worst class of convicts are kept at 
Viper's island, where there is an Andaman village. Tea cultivation has been commenced at 
a point called Aberdeen in the central island. The Latitude of Port Blair (Chatham Island) 
is 1 1' 41' 13'' N. Longitude 92° 42' 44" E. 

Adjoining the Andaman Islands, between them and the Mergui Archipelago, is Barren 
Island, a remarkable, active volcano. The whole of this island is a volcanic cone about two 
miles in diameter as it rises out of the sea, and 1,700 feet high ; its last recorded eruption took 
place in 1792. On the north, are the two small uninhabited islands called The CocoSy distant 
from Port Blair 175 miles, the larger of which is six miles long and two miles broad, the smaller, 
two and a half miles long and a mile broad. The Coco channel separates them from the 
Andamans. 

NICOBAR ISLANDS,— A group of islands situated between the parallels of 6' 40' and 
9' 20', and meridians of 93* and 94% about 1 50 miles south of the Andamans and about the 
same distance from Sumatra. They form two groups, the south group composed of the 
islands Great and Little Nicobar or Sambelong,— the former about thirty miles long by 
twelve broad, and the latter fourteen miles long, by ten broad, separated by St. George's 
channel, about six miles broad — and several smaller islets. The north group, separated from the 
south by the Sombrero channel, is composed of the islands Katchall, Nancowry, Camorta 
(the largest), Trinkut, Terressa, Bompocka, Tillanchong, Chowry, Batti-Malve, and the distant 
Car Nicobar. They possess two good harbours, and the southern group is covered to the 
highest summits with dense forest, while the northern is only wooded on the lower slopes 
oif the hills, towards the sea-board, the tops being covered with grass. They are inhabited by 
piratical Malays, who carry on a considerable traffic in cocoanuts, betel-nuts, pigs, poultry and 
yams. Compared with the Andamanese, these people are perfectly civilised ; they wear cloth- 
ing, speak a little English and construct their boats and huts with great ingenuity. The popula- 
tion is small, about 8,000. The Danes formed a settlement there in 1756, but abandoned all 
claim to the sovereignty over the islands in 1848. Formal possession was taken of the whole 
group in the year 1869 by the British, Government, for a convict settlement. The climate is 
unhealthy. Nancowry is distant 225 miles from Port Blair and 390 miles from Rangoon. 

LACCADIVE ISLANDS.— Pl cluster of coral islands lying about 100 miles off the 
Malabar coast of India, between the parallels of 10" and 13* N. and the meridians of 72** and 
74**, E., and containing a population of about seven or eight thousand souls. They form twenty 
Atols or groups, besides numerous small islands or reefs. The largest, named Underroot^ is 
the most productive, the rest being comparatively barren, yielding little else than cocoanuts. 
The natives are a mild and inoffensive race, living poorly and dwelling in low thatched, stone 
built houses. The greater portion of these islands were under the uncontrolled management 
of a Princess of Cannanore, subject to the payment of an annual tribute to the British Govern- 
ment of ;£i,ooo This tribute having fallen into arrear, the whole of the five group of islands 
in her possession were attached, and are now under British administration. They are included 
in the district of south Kanara, under the Madras jurisdiction. The island of Minicoyy lying 
further south, near the parallel of 8% is also included in the same district. 



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1 84 Ocean Islands, — Continued 

MALDIVE ISLANDS ; or, MalecUva (Thousand Isles). A chain of coral islands south of 
the Laccadives, extending from Latitude o' 40' S. to 7° 6' N., and nearly on the meridian of 
73* 30' E., with a breadth of about fifty miles. The group is composed of seventeen Atols, each 
of which is fringed with reefs, sometimes extending to the distance of two or three miles, be- 
yond which there are no soundings. In the centre of each Atol, there is a lagoon of from 15 
to 49 fathoms in depth. They are richly clothed with wood, chiefly palm, and are fertile in 
fruit and various edible roots ; they also produce millet, and abound in cocoanuts, fowls and all 
descriptions of fish. The inhabitants are a timid, inoffensive and civilised race, and carry on a 
considerable trade with Bengal, Ceylon, the Malabar Coast, and Sumatra. They are expert 
navigators and sailors, and have schools for teaching navigation on some of the islands, and 
even make and repair nautical instruments. They are remarkable for their hospitality and 
kindness to shipwrecked mariners, for which they refuse all pecuniary compensation, and arc 
Mahomedans governed by a Sultan whose title and rank are hereditary. He resides in the 
Island of Male or Mohl, and pays an annual tribute to the British Government in Ceylon. The 
population consists of about 200,000 souls. 

CEYLON,— T\i\% large and beautiful island, "The jewel of the Eastern Seas," lies to the 
south of the peninsula of India, between the parallels of 5" 55' and 9" 51' North Latitude, and the 
meridians of 79° 41' and 81** 54' East Longitude. It is separated from the main-land by Palts 
Strait, and the Gulf of Manaar, which at their narrowest part, along what is known as Adam's 
Bridge, are about sixty-two miles in width. The distance between the most northerly point of 
the peninsula of Jaffna, and Point Calimere on the coast of the Kamatik, is only about forty 
miles. Its greatest length, from north to south, is about 270 miles, and its greatest width, from 
east to west, about 156 miles. Its area is about 24,454 square miles. 

Adam's Bridge, which almost connects Ceylon with the main-land of India, consists of a 
chain of low coral reefs and sand-banks, stretching between the islands of Manaar and 
Paumben. 

The central part of the island is mountainous, consisting of a succession of mountainous 
ridges with intervening valleys, many of them of considerable elevation. The highest peak is 
that of Pedrotallagalla, which overlooks the plain of Nuwara Eliya, and reaches an elevation of 
8,260 feet. The plain itself is upwards of 6,200 feet above the sea level, and is resorted to as a 
sanitarium by the English residents of the low country. 

Other important heights are Kirrigalpota 7,810 feet, Totapella 7,720 feet, and Adam's peak, 
an isolated mountain on the south-west of the central mountain zone, formerly supposed to be 
the highest in Ceylon, but now ascertained to be only 7,420 feet in height. Between the moun- 
tainous district and the sea, there is a broad belt of low country extending around the coast, 
but narrower in the southern part of the island than in the northern. 

Numerous rivers and streams take their rise among the mountains in the interior, and flow 
in all directions to the sea. The largest of these are the Mahawila-Ganga, which rises in the 
neighbourhood of Nuwara Eliya, and flows into the Bay of Bengal near Trincomalee ; the 
Kalany-Ganga, which enters the sea a little to the north of Colombo on the western coast ; the 
Kalu-Ganga, Maha Oya, and several others. Although few of its rivers are available to any 
great extent for navigation, no country in the world is perhaps so well watered as Ceylon. 
There are no natural lakes, properly so-called, in the island, but along different parts of the 
eastern and western coasts, there are extensive lagoons or backwaters, similar to those on the 
Malabar coast of the Madras Presidency. 

The climate of Ceylon is peculiarly under the influence of the monsoons. The north-east 
monsoon prevails from November till March or April, and the south-western from May till Octo- 
ber. Variable winds and considerable atmospheric disturbance mark the transition from one 
monsoon to the other. Notwithstanding its low latitude, the temperature is generally much 
less oppressive than in India. On the western coast it varies but slightly throughout the year, 
and the atmosphere in this part of the island, especially during the prevalence of the south- 
west monsoon, is exceedingly moist. The eastern and northern parts are hotter and drier. The 
climate of the hill country is temperate and healthy. The most unhealthy districts are those 



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Ocean Islands, — Continned. 185 

situated at the foot of, and surrounding the central mountain region. The rainfall is consider- 
able, the greatest quantity of rain falling about the setting in of the south-west monsoon, but 
heavy downpours occur at intervals throughout the year, even the dry season being interrupted 
by refreshing showers, March and April are the hottest months of the year. 

The chief production of the mineral kingdom is plumbago, which is largely exported. Ores of 
iron and manganese are pretty generally diffused, and nitre, alum and salt are also obtained. 
The island yields also numerous gems, as amethysts, rubies, sapphires, cat's-eyes, garnets, &c. 
The pearl fishery in the Gulf of Manaar, on the north-west coast of Ceylon, was formerly the 
most productive in the world, but for many years past, no pearls have been obtained to speak 
of. The manufacture of salt, which is a Government monopoly, is confined to particular loca- 
lities. Hambantota on the south coast, and Publam to the north of Colombo, are the chief salt 
producing places. Much salt is also made in the vicinity of Jaffna. The vegetation is rich 
and varied. All the plants and fruits of the main-land flourish freely, with others which are not 
so well known in India. 

The chief vegetable productions besides paddy (rice), grown chiefly in the lowlands, are 
the cocoanut, coffee and cinnamon, which form the main source of wealth to the island. The 
cocoanut palm is found mostly in the maritime districts of the west and south. The cinnamon 
plant is cultivated extensively on the western coast, chiefly in the neighborhood of Colombo. 
The plantations of coffee are situated mostly upon the mountain slopes, and in the lofty valleys 
of the interior. A considerable amount of European energy, skill and capital have of late years 
been brought to bear upon the production in Ceylon of this useful article of commerce. About 
1,000,000 cwt. of coffee, the produce of the Ceylon plantations, are exported yearly to the Euro- 
pean and other markets. 

The forests contain valuable timber trees, as satin-wood, jack-wood, calamander, ebony 
and others. Cotton and sugar-cane can be grown, but are not cultivated to any extent. 
Tobacco is cultivated in the northern parts, where also the black palmyra abounds, and is largely 
exported. Potatoes and other European vegetables are grown in the Kandyan country. 

The government of Ceylon is entirely separate from that of India. Ceylon is a crown 
colony, and is administered by a governor appointed by the Queen, assisted by an executive 
council of five members, and a legislative council of fifteen (including the executive). 

For administrative purposes the island is divided into six provinces, viz.^ the western, cen- 
tral, southern, eastern, north-western and northern, each under the control of a Government 
Agent. The provinces are again subdivided into districts, over each of which an Assistant 
Government Agent is appointed. There is a supreme, civil and criminal court, and district 
courts of the chief stations of the several provinces, z//>., Colombo, Kandy, Galle, Batticaloa, 
Kurungalla and Jaffna or Jaffnapatam. 

The means of internal communication are good, the island being traversed in most parts 
by excellent roads. A railway connects Colombo with the mountain capital Kandy, and has 
been extended into the coffee producing districts of the Central Province. 

The population of the island according to a census taken in 1871 was 2,405,287. The 
inhabitants consist principally of native Cinghalese in the western, north-western, central and 
southern provinces, and Tamils in the northern and eastern. Besides these, there are in all the 
large towns, numbers of people of mixed(European and native) origin, who are designated Burghers 
or Eurasians. In addition also to the Tamils, who are permanently resident in the country, 
there is a large floating population of immigrants from the coast of India, who are engaged in 
the coffee cultivation and other industrial pursuits in Ceylon. Mahomedans of Arab descent 
are found scattered throughout the island, engaged chiefly as traders. The Weddas, an 
aboriginal and savage race, inhabit the remote jungles of the interior and subsist mainly upon 
the products of the chase. 

The chief to\vns are Colombo^ the capital and seat of Government, situated on the western 
coast near the mouth of the Kalany-Ganga, population about 100,000. Colombo harbour is only 
capable of receiving small vessels. Galle^ or Point de Galle is the chief town in the southern 
province, and the port of call for all the mail steamers proceeding to Calcutta, China and Australia 



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1 86 The Straits Settlements. 

or homewards. TrincomaUee on the north-east coast, has a fine harbour, but little used, except 
by the ships of the Royal Navy. It was formerly the seat of the Government ^ency of the 
eastern province. Jaffrta^ or Jaffnapatam^ on a peninsula in the extreme north of Ceylon, is the 
capital of the northern province. Kandy, the chief town of the central province, 72 miles 
from Colombo, was the capital of the island at the time of its conquest by the British. It is 
situated in a valley at an elevation of about 1,700 feet above the sea level, near it is Peradeniya^ 
with its satin-wood bridge over the Mahawila-Ganga. and its pretty botanical gardens. Other 
places of some importance are Kalutara (Caltura), Negombo a little to the north of Colombo, 
and Putlam on the western coast. Matara and Hambantota on the southern, and Batticaloa 
the residence of the Government agent of the eastern province, on the east coast. In the 
interior are Nuwara Eliya, the sanitarium of the island, situated on a plain 6,200 feet above 
the sea. Kurunegalia, the chief town of the north-western province, Gampolla^ MateUU and 
Badulla. 

The first settlement Europeans in Ceylon was made by the Portuguese in the early par 
of the 1 6th century. In the following century the Portuguese were deprived of their posses- 
sions in the island by the Dutch, whose settlements fell into the hands of the English in 1796, 
when Ceylon was annexed to the Presidency of Madras. Shortly afterwards in 1801 it was 
made into a separate colony. 



THE STRAITS SETTLEMENTS AND ADEN. 

The Straits Settlements, comprising a total area of about 1,600 square miles and containing 
a population of about 206,000 souls, consist of the islands of Singapore and Penang, oflf the coast 
of the Malay Peninsula, together with a considerable tract of country in the neighbourhood of 
Malacca, on the coast between Singapore and Penang, and a tract of smaller area known as the 
Wellesley Province, on the same coast and adjoining Penang. They were all formerly regarded 
as dependencies of the Bengal Government, but now form a crown colony, with an adminis- 
tration quite independent of that of India. The chief authority is vested in a Governor 
appointed by the Queen, as in the case of Ceylon, assisted by an executive council and a 
legislative council The several settlements are under the control of Lieutenant-Governors, 
who are also members of the contral, executive and legislative assemblies. The following is a 
brief account of them ; 

PENANG, OR PULO PENANG,^i^\.^VxiM\ Island) called also Prince of Wales* 
Island, is situated between 5* 15' and 5° 30' North Latitude, and in Longitude loo" 15' 
E., off the western coast of the Malay peninsula, and separated from the peninsula by a strait 
about two miles in breadth at its narrowest part. The island is 16 miles long, and from 8 to 12 
miles broad, and comprises an area of 165 square miles, with a population of some 40,000 
souls. The interior of Penang rises into hills of considerable elevation, nearly 2,500 feet 
above sea level, running from north to south, which divide the island into two nearly equal 
portions. The plain country on the eastern side of the hills, is the most thickly inhabited 
part, on this side is situated fort Comwallis. 

The climate is relaxing and enervating, owing to the excessive humidity of the atmosphere 
conjoined with great heat. Except in unusually dry years, a month does not pass without 
more or less rain, and the usual yearly rainfall ranges from 60 to 90 inches. January and 
February are the driest months. There is no cold season to invigorate the system after the 
oppressive heat, for this reason the climate is a trying one to Europeans. The mornings and 
nights are cool throughout the year, and fogs, so prevalent on the opposite coast, that of 
Province Wellesley, do not occur except at the base of the hills. The southerly wind is 
considered unhealthy, but is fortunately rare, while the northern is refreshing and pleasant. 

Fruits are obtained in abundance on the island and pine-apples grow wild. 

Penang was ceded to the British in 1786, by the chief of the adjacent territory of Queddah. 

PROVINCE WELLESLEY— \s a small strip of country about 35 miles in length and 
4 in breadth, on the Queddah coast of the Malay peninsula, opposite to the island of Penang, 



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The Straits Settlements,— Continued. 187 

ceded to the British in 1820 by the chief of Queddah. The chief town of this settlement is 
George Town. The channel between the main-land and the island of Penang, forms a good 
natural harbour for shipping. Population about 52,000, area 140 square miles. 

Notwithstanding its closeness to Penang, the climate of the settlement differs materially 
in some respects from that of the island. It is not so much subject to the oppressive calms 
and damp heated atmosphere, and is therefore cooler, and the air fresher and more invigorat- 
ing, the maximum heat being 87°. The dry season includes December, January, February and 
March, and less rain falls on the coast than on the island of Penang. 

MALACCA — Is an extensive district situated on the western coast of the Malay peninsula, 
between Singapore and Penang. It extends for about 40 miles along the coast, and inland 
to a distance of about 25 miles, comprising an area of about 1,000 square miles. The coast 
is barren and rocky, and the interior mountainous, with picturesque valleys covered with dense, 
but roadless forests containing valuable timber. The boundaries of the district have not been 
laid down, little in fact being known of the interior, or of any other parts, beyond the coast 
and the borders of the Malacca river, which is navigable during the rainy season for small 
boats for about 15 miles. Several hot springs are found in the interior, distant about 18 miles 
from the chief town, one of which is at Sabang near port Lismore, and another in the 
Naming district. These hot springs are much resorted to by all classes of natives for the 
cure of various local diseases. 

The climate is salubrious, and the temperature equable, the thermometer ranging from 
72* to 85** throughout the year. From the end of November to the end of February, the pre- 
vailing winds are northerly. It usually rains during the whole of December, but fair weather 
succeeds in January and February. In April the south-west monsoon commences, and is suc- 
ceeded by the north-east monsoon in November. The most unhealthy time of the year, is 
during the Sumatra gales, in August and September. Land winds blow at night throughout 
the entire year. 

The vegetable productions of the country include rice, sago, pepper, cocoanuts and fruits. 
Tin mines are worked in various parts. The inhabitants, numbering about 54,000, are chiefly 
Malays, Portuguese and Chinese. Malacca, the chief town, is picturesquely situated at the 
entrance of the Malacca river, and is one of the oldest European settlements in the East 
It was founded by the Portuguese in 1 5 10, and held by them till it was taken by the Dutch in 
1642. The Dutch were dispossessed by the English in 1795, but were reinstated in their sover- 
eignty over the territory in 1818. By a treaty, however, concluded with Holland in 1824, 
Malacca was finally ceded to the English. 

SINGAPORE. — An island in the strait of Malacca, situated off the southern extremity 
of the Malay peninsula. It is separated from the main-land by a narrow channel not more 
than Ji<' of a mile in width. The island is about 27 miles long, and about 1 1 miles broad, and 
comprises an area of about 275 square miles. 

The surface of Singapore is beautifully diversified with hills, valleys and plains, the whole 
being covered with a luxuriant vegetation down to the water's edge. The only hills of any 
considerable elevation is Bukit Tehna^ or the tin hill, near the northern coast, and about 1,200 
feet in height. The soil is fertile, producing sugar, cotton, coffee, nutmegs, pepper and cocoanuts^ 

Singapore, the chief town and the seat of Government, is situated on the south side of the 
island, on both banks of a salt water creek, navigable for lighters and other small craft. It is 
one of the great emporiums of trade in the East, and possesses a splendid harbour, safe, easily 
approached and well sheltered. Latitude i* 17' 20" N., Longitude 103° 51' 18^ E. 

The climate of Singapore, though sultry, is not unhealthy. The atmosphere is in general 
extremely moist, moderating the high temperature and agreeing well with European constitu- 
tions. At night, dense fogs spread over the island, and at particular seasons the dews are heavy. 
The thermometer seldom rises higher than 86", or falls below 70"*, nor does it vary more than 
four or five degrees in the 24 hours. The north-east monsoon commences about the 1 5th October, 
continuing until the setting in of the south-west monsoon, about the middle of April. Rain is 
never very constant, and the average yearly rainfall is about 90 inches. 



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1 88 Aden. 

The inhabitants, principally Malays and Chinese, number from fifty to sixty thousand, the 
Chinese being the most numerous as well as the most industrial class. 

The town was an ancient Malay settlement. It was taken by the British in 1818, and the 
sovereignty of Britain was confirmed by a convention with the Dutch in 1825. 



ADEN. 

Aden is a peninsula situated on the south coast of the Province of Yemen, in Arabia 
Felix, and is located in Latitude i2'*-47* North, and Longitude 45**- 10' East. 

The British territory includes the peninsula and extends to a creek named Khor Maksar, 
about two miles to the northward of the defensive work across the Isthmus.- 

The adjoining peninsula of Jebel Ihsan, generally called little Aden, i» within British 
limits, as is also the harbour. The area of the land may be approximately stated at about 
thirty-five square miles. The population, exclusive of the garrison, was 19,290 in 1872. 

The inhabited peninsula is about fifteen miles in circumference, of an irregular oval form, 
five miles in its greater, and three in its lesser diameter, and is connected with the continent 
by a narrow neck of land, 1350 yards in breadth, which is in one place nearly covered by 
the sea at high spring tides, in fact, it would be, were it not for a causeway constructed for the 
convenience of the land traffic, and the passage of the Sheikh Othman aqueduct. 

Aden is a large crater formed of lofty precipitous hills, the highest peak of which has an 
altitude of 1775 feet ; these on the exterior sides slope towards the sea, throwmg out numerous 
spurs, which form a series of valleys radiating from a common centre. A gap exists opposite 
the fortified island of Seerah, the position of which would induce the belief that the circle was 
at one time complete, but that some convulsion of nature produced the gap. 

Aden West-Bay, more generally known as Aden Back-Bay, formed by the peninsula 
of Jebel Ishsan on the west, and Jebel Shum Shum on the east, is about eight miles broad fix>in 
cast to west, by four miles from north to south, and is divided into two bays by a spit which runs 
off half a mile to the southward of the small island of Aliyah. The depth of water in the 
western bay is from three to four fathoms, decreasing gradually towards the shore ; across the 
entrance, four and a half to five fathoms ; and at a distance of two miles out side, ten to twelve 
fathoms. 

There are several islands in the inner bay ; the principal, Jazira Sawayih, or Slave Island, 
is 300 feet high, and almost joined to the main land at low water. 

The climate during the north-east monsoon, or from October to April, is cool and plea- 
sant, particularly in November, December and January. During the remainder of the year, hot 
sandy winds, known as shamed^ or north, indicating the direction from which they come, pre- 
vail within the crater ; but on the western or Steamer Point side, the breezes coming directly 
off the sea, are fairly cool, and that locality is accordingly much preferred by European resi- 
dents. The months of May and September are especially disagreeable, those being the periods 
of the change of the monsoons, when the wind almost entirely ceases, and the air is close and 
oppressive; towards morning a cool and refreshing land breeze generally springs up. Aden is not 
usually considered by medical men to be an unhealthy station, but it is a well ascertained 
feet, that long residence impairs the faculties and undermines the constitution of Europeans, 
and even natives of India suffer from the effects of too prolonged an abode in the settlement. 

The town and part of the military, cantonment are within the crater, and consequently 
are surrounded on all sides by hills, save on the eastern side, where a gap exists. 

The supply of water which is now plentiful in the settlement, is derived from four sources, 
xns.^ wells, aqueducts, tanks and reser>'oirs, and condensers. The annual rainfall at Aden is 
very limited, seldom exceeding six or seven inches, as long as the tanks have water in them, 
the three condensers on the settlement are not worked, from these water is obtainable on 
an emergency to the extent of 46,600 gallons per diem, should the supply in the tanks and 



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Aden, — Continued. 1 89 

wells fall short at any time. There are, in addition, several condensers belonging to private 
companies, who sell water to the public. 

The garrison and camp followers number 3,500. Europeans live in Aden in exactly the 
same manner as in India, but the actual expenditure incurred, is about 20 per cent, in excess 
of what it would be in Bombay, and consequently still greater than what would be required 
in the mofussiL Wines, spirits, beer and European stores are somewhat cheaper than in 
India, owing to Aden being a free port, but unless private individuals import their own require, 
ments, such articles can only be purchased from the local shop-keepers at about Indian prices. 

The settlement is presided over by an officer who is styled Political Resident^ and who 
resides at Steamer Point, but his office is in the crater. The Resident has two assistants, and 
there is a cantonment magistrate, who is also ex officio^ an assistant. These officers perform all 
the civil, revenue, judicial and ministerial duties of the settlement. Aden is politically subject 
to the Government of Bombay, and is considered for legal purposes as part of British India. 

Since its capture in 1839 by the British, great attention has been paid to the fortifying 
of Aden, and all the latest improvements, in engineering and artillery, have been applied to 
render it almost impregnable. 

The port of Aden is in charge of a Conservator, and is regulated by the Indian Ports Act. 
Since the opening of the Suez Canal, the visits of ships of foreign navies are becoming more 
frequent yearly, necessitating a vessel of war of some size being always stationed at Aden. 

The Arab tribes we have to deal with at Aden are the following, via : — 

The Abdali tribe, inhabiting a district lying in a north north-westerly direction from 
Aden, called Lahej^ about thirty-three miles long and eight broad. Al-Hautah, the capital, 
where the Sultan resides, is situated about twenty-one miles from the Barrier-Gate. The popu- 
lation of this district is about 15,000. The Abdalis are the most civilised but least warlike of 
all the tribes in south-western Arabia. 

The Fadhli tribe, inhabiting two large districts, with a sea-board of 100 miles, extending 
eastward from the boundary of the Abdali, Shograh^ their chief sea port, is situated 60 or 
70 miles from Aden. The Fadhlis are proud, warlike and independent, possessing in a high 
degree the virtues and vices of the true Bedawin, Their number of fighting men is about 6,700. 

The Akrabi tribe, inhabiting a district, the coast line of which stretches from Bir Ahmed 
to Ras Amran. This people have a high reputation for courage. 

There are other tribes, but as they do not reside in the immediate vicinity of Aden, it 
is unnecessary to refer to them. 

The language of the place is Arabic, but other Asiatic tongues, as Hindustani, Persian, 
Gujarati, Sindi, &c., as well as several European languages, are spoken and understood. 



THE ISLAND OF PERIM. 

Attached to the Government of Aden is the island of Perim, known among the Arabs 
as Mayoon, It is situated in the Straits of Babel Mandeb, a mile and a half from the Arabian, 
and eleven miles from the African coast ; it has an excellent and capacious harbour, about a 
mile and a half in length, half a mile in breadth, and with a varying depth of from four to six 
fathoms. The highest point of the island is 245 feet above the level of the sea. The island was 
first taken possession of by the East India Company in 1799, but was then deemed untenable 
as a military position ; it was re-occupied in the beginning of 1857, a light house erected, and 
quarters built for a detachment of native infantry, fifty strong, who now garrison the place 
under the command of a British officer. This detachment is relieved every two months. 

All endeavours to procure water have failed, and but a scanty supply is procurable from 
the adjacent coasts ; a condensing apparatus now supplies this want, as at Aden. 

The only other British possessions in the vicinity of Arabia, are, the Massah Islands in the 
Bay of Tajurra, the island of Eibat near Zaila, and the Kooria Mooria Islands on the Mahra 
coast of Arabia. They are only valuable for the guano deposits which are found upon them. 



A I 

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I90 

GLOSSARY OF INDIAN TERRITORIAL DESIGNATIONS. 

Araican. — ^A tract of country about 300 miles in length, situated to the east of the Bay of 
Bengal, between the parallels of 18' and 21* 30' N., and meridians of 92* and 95" E., 
under the British Burmah jurisdiction^ comprising the districts of Akyab, North- 
ern Arakan, Kyoukhpyoo and Sandoway. — (See p. 87 and 88.) 

Baghelkhand. — The country of the Baghelas, embracing the native states of Rewah, N^ode, 
Maihar, Sohawal and Koti, under the Central India Agency.— (^S'/tf p. 112.) 

Bari Doab. — The plain country between the Sutlej and Ravi, and the Bias and Ravi rivers.— 
Doab signifies two waters. — (See p. 23.) 

Behar. — A province under the Bengal jurisdiction, comprising the divisions of Patna and 
Bhagalpur.— (^^^/. p. 51-52 and 55.) 

Bengal. — A Province under the Bengal jurisdiction, comprising the Burdwan, Rajshahj'C and 
Cooch Behar, and Dacca divisions. — (See p. 47-48-49-50 and 55.) 

Bengal Presidency. — The chief Presidency of British India. All territory not included 
within the Bombay and Madras Presidencies, has been hitherto deemed as coming 
within the limits of this third great division of India, designated *The Bengal Pre- 
sidency.' This designation, though still maintained for convenience, is, however, 
now regarded as obsolete, considering the many distinct provinces, and indepen- 
dent territorial jurisdictions which it now embraces. — (See p. 5.) 

Berar. — The country assigned by the Nizam of Hyderabad to the British, and known as the 
Hyderabad Assigned Districts, or Berar. — (See p. 95 and 96.) 

BHATriANA. — So called from having been the possession of the Bhattis of Rajput descent A 
tract comprised within the British district of Sirsa and the northern portion of the 
Bickaneer state, between the paralells of 29"* 12' and 30** 30', and meridians of 
ff d and 75" 20'. 

Bundelkhand. —The country of the Bundelas. A tract bounded on the west and north- 
west by the Gwalior state ; on the north-east by the Jumna River which separates it 
from the British districts of Etawah, Cawnpore, Fatehpur and Allahabad ; on 
the east by Baghelkhand, and on the south by the British districts of Saugor, 
Damoh and Jubbulpore.—Y^^^ p. 11 2-1 14 and 115.) 

BhabAR. — ^A belt of waterless jungle, formed of boulders and the debris of the lower ranges 
of the Himalayas, extending from four to fourteen miles in breadth, and lying 
between the Tarai and the sub- Himalayas. — (See p. 36.) 

BabriAWAR. — A district in the peninsula of Kattywar, province of Gujarat, named from the 
Babria tribe of coolies who inhabit it, lying to the west of the Gohelwar district 

BhakAR.— A tract of rugged hill country near Mount Abu, to the east of the Sirohee state, 
inhabited by Grassias, a half-blood tribe between Bhils and Rajputs. — (See p. 105.) 

Carnatic. — See Karnatik. 

Chhattisgarh. — The south-eastern division of the Central Provinces, comprising the dis- 
tricts of Raipur, Bilaspur and Sambalpur, between the parallels of So** 30' and 
83"* 15' N., and meridians of 16" 50' and 23" 10' E., bounded on the north by Rewah 
native state, and province Chota-Nagpore of the Bengal jurisdiction ; on the south 
by Bastar native state, and on the west by the districts of Chanda, Bhandara, 
Balaghat, Seoni and Mandla of the Central Provinces. — (See p. 76.) 

Chota-Nagpore. — A province under the Bengal jurisdiction, comprising the districts of 
Hazaribagh, Lohardugga, Singhbhoom, and Manbhoom, and the Garhjat states 
of Chang-Bakhar, Koria, Sarguja, Jashpur, Udaipur, Gangpur and Bonai. — (Set 
p. 53 and 55.) 

ChappAN. — A stretch of rugged hill country and jungle in the south-east comer of the Oodey- 
pore state, Rajputana. — (Se^^^, 105.) 

ChaumelA. — A strip of country in the extreme south-east corner of Rajputana. — (See p. 105.) 

CiRCARS. — See Northern Circars. 

DeccAN. — In its usual acceptation implies the tract of country in Southern India, situated 
between the Nerbudda and Kistna rivers. Properly speaking, however, it includes 
the whole of the territory lying south of the Vindhya mountains which separate 
it from Hindustan on the north, and between the Eastern and Western Ghats. 



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Glossary of Indian Territorial DesigntlfTons, — Continued. 191 

Derajat or Daman, the border. — The country stretching between the Suliman range 
of hills and the Indus, and so called from the three towns, Dera Ismail Khan, 
Dera Ghazi Khan and Dera Fateh Khan lying within it. — (See p. 22.) 

DUARS. — Passes leading from the Bhutan mountains into the Darrang and Kamrup districts of 
Assam, including the country on the British border to their south. There are 
eleven bordering on Kooch Behar and British territory^ between the rivers Tista 
and Monas, five on the north frontier of the Kamrup district, and two on that of 
the Darrang district. 

GoDWAR. — A small tract of hilly country lying between Sirohee native state and Merwara, on 
the boundary between the Oodeypore and Jodhpore states in Rajputana. 

GOHELWAR. — A district in the peninsula of Kattywar, province Gujarat, named from the 
Gohel Rajputs by whom it is principally peopled, lying south of the Ahmedabad 
district, and on the east of districts Babriawar and Kattywar. 

GONDWANA. — Or the land of the Gond race ; an extensive, imperfectly defined hilly tract of 
Central India, it may however be considered as lying between Latitudes 19" 50' 
and 24" 30' N., and Longitudes ^^'* 40' and 87* 30' E. This name is now regarded 
as obsolete. 

Gujarat. — ^An extensive province of the Bombay Presidency, comprehending within its limits 
the peninsula of Kattywar, the whole territories of the Gaikhwar and of his 
tributaries, together with the petty independent states, in Mahi Kanta and Rewa 
Kanta, and bounded on the north by the Gulf of Cutch and the territories of 
Mallani, Marwar and Meywar of the Rajputana Agency, on the south by the 
Gulf of Cambay and the British districts of Khandtsh and Surat of the Bombay 
Presidency, on the east by the Khandesh district, and Malwa of the Central 
India Agency, and on the west by the Arabian Sea. — (See p. 143, 148 and 154.) 

Garhwal, British and Native. — A tract of country in the Himalayas, bounded on the north by 
the native state of Bashahr of the Punjab, and Hundes or south-western Tibet ;on 
the east by the British district of Kumaun ; on the south by Rohilkhand, and on 
the west by the British district of Dehra Dun. The native portion is the state of 
Tehri, the British portion is the district of Garhwal in the Kumaun division 
of the North-Western Provinces. — (See p. 34 and 36.) 

Hallar or Hallawar. — a district in the peninsula of Kattywar, province Gujarat, named from 
the Halla tribe of Rajputs who inhabit it. It is bounded on the north by the Gulf 
of Cutch ; on the north-east by the districts of Machu-Kanta and Jhallawar ; on the 
east by the district of Kattywar ; on the south by the districts of Kattywar and 
Sorath, and on the west by the district of Okhmandal. 

Haraoti — A tract comprised within the native states of Boondee, Kotah and Jhallawar in the 
Rajputana Agency. — (See p. 103.) 

Harriana. — ^A tract comprised in the British district of Hissar, and the northern portion of 
the Bickaneer state, lying between Latitude 28" 33' and 30** o' N., and Longitude 
752° o' and 76^ 22' E. 

Hundes or Nari Khorsum. — The south-western portion of Thibet lying to the north of 
Garhwal and Kumaun. 

JAINTIA Hills — A hilly tract adjoining the Khasi hills on the east, and comprised in the district 
named Khasi and Jaintia hills. — (S^^ p. 65 and 68.) 

Jaunsar Bawar. — A tract comprising the northern sub-division of district Dehra Dun, in the 
North- Western Provinces. — {See p. 36.) 

Jach or Chaj Doab.— The plain country between the Jhelum and Chenab rivers of the 
Punjab. — (See p. 23.) 

JhallawAd. — A district in the peninsula of Kattywar, province Gujarat, named from the 
Jhalla tribe of Rajputs who principally people it. It extends over the north-eastern 
part of the peninsula ; on the south and south-west are the districts of Kattywar 
and Hallar, and on the west is the district of Machukanta, area 2,914, square miles. 

JULLUNDUR D.OAB. — The plain country between the Bias and Sutlej rivers of the Punjab.— (5*^^ 
p. 23) 

Kanara. — A tract stretching along the western coast of India from the Portuguese territory of 
Goa down to the district of Malabar. It is divided into north and south, the 
former portion naming the district of Kanara in the Bombay Presidency, the latter 



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192 Glossary of Indian Territorial Designations, — Continued. 

being the district of the same name in the Madras Presidency.^^5^;tf p. 122 and 
145) 
Karnatic. — A division of Southern India confined to the eastern side of the Madras Presi- 
dency. The limits were probably at no time very accurately or clearly defined. 
It is said to commence at the southern limit of the Kistna aistrict, and to extend 
down to Cape Comorin. 

Kattywar. — The name of a peninsula comprehended in the province of Gujarat, and lying to 
the west. On the north it is bounded by the Gulf of Cutch, on tne west and south 
by the Arabian Sea, and on the east by the Gulf of Cambay. — {See p. 153.) 

Khasi Hills. — A tract of hilly country lying between the Assam districts of Kamrup and 
Sylhetj and between the Garo and Jaintia hills. This tract and the Jaintia hills 
comprise a district in Assam. — {See p. 65 and 68.) 

KONKAN. — ^A narrow tract in the Presidency of Bombay, comprised in the districts of Thana, 
Kolaba and Ratnagiri, and ^stretching along the coast from the native state of 
Sawantwari, on the frontier of Goa, to the Daman river on the north, a length of 
about 330 miles, with a breadth varying from 25 to 50 miles.— (5*^ p. 154.) 

Machu Kanta. — A district in the peninsula of Kattywar, province of Gujarat, named from the 
river Machu which flows through its centre to the Gulf of Cutch, lying to the west 
of the Jhallawad district. 

Mahi Kanta. — A tract lying on the north-east of the provhace of Gujarat, extending from the 
Ahmedabad district to the Rajputana frontier. — (5>/p. 153.) 

Malabar. — A tract naming a district of the Madras Presidency, bounded on the north by 
Kanara and Coofg, on the east by Mysore native state and district Coimbatore, on 
the south by Cochin native state, and on the west by the sea. — {See p. 122.) 

MALLANI. — A tract within the territory of the Jodhpore native state, lying on the south-west of 
Rajputana, bounded on the north-west by Jeysulmere native state, on the east and 
south by Marwar, and on the west by Sind. — (See p. 102 and 103.) 

Malwa. — ^A tract in Central India, bounded on the west by the Aravalli range, on the south by 
the Vindhya chain of hills, on the east by Bundelkhand, and included in the south- 
ern portions of the Rajputana and Central India Agencies. — {See^, 112 and 115.) 

Marwar. — ^Another name for Jodhpore native state in the Rajputana Agency. — (See p 
102.) 

Mergui Archipelago. — A large cluster of islands, commencing in the north with Tavoy 
Island, about 13° 13' N. Latitude, and stretching southward beyond the limits of 
British territory. The majority are mountainous, the height of some being 3,000 
feet. Main^ Island in 12 32' N. Latitude, and 98** 7' £. Longitude, can be seen 
for eleven miles, and the southern peak of St. Matthew's Island, 10' 52' N. Lati- 
tude, and 98* E. Longitude^ for thirteen miles. Some of them are clothed with 
dense vegetation, and they are but sparsely inhabited, a few Burmese and Karengs 
having settled on one or two. They are probably rich in minerals. The Caout- 
chouc tree is asserted to grow in great abundance on the Islands, which are, how- 
ever, infested by snakes, rhinoceros, tigers and deer. — {See p. 89.) 

Merwara. — A narrow strip of hill country connected with the district of Ajmere, about one 
hundred miles in length, and fifteen to twenty miles broad, lying between North 
Latitude 25° 23' and 26' 11', and East Longitude 73* 47' and 74* 30'.— (^.S>^ p. loi.) 

Meywar. — Another name for Oodeypore native state in the Rajputana Agency— (^^^^ p. 102 

and 105.) 
Meywar Hill Tracts. — A rugged bit of country in the south-west comer of the Oodeypore 

state, Rajputana Agency, covered with forest. — (See p. 105.) 

MiNA Kherar. — A tract, rugged and hilly, in the north-east comer of the Oodeypore state in 
the Rajputana Agency.— (^S*^^ p. 105.) 

Naga Hills. — A hilly district of that name in the province of Assam. — (See p. 65 and 68.) 
Also the country extending from North (Jachar as far as the Dihing river in the 
extreme eastem part of Assam. 

NlMAR OR NiMAWAR, BriHsh and Native, — A tract in Western India, about 130 miles in 
length from east to west, apparently denominated from the town of the same 
name in the native portion. It comprises a large portion of the valley of the 
Nerbudda, and of the Vindhya mountains, which enclose it on the north, and of 



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Glossary of Indian Territorial Designations, — Continued. 193 

the Satpurasy which enclose it on the south. The British portion is the district of 
that name in the Nerbudda division of the Central Provinces. — (See p. 75.) 

Northern Circars. — A.n antiquated division of the Madras Presidency between Latitude 15* 
40^ and 20" 17' N., and Longitude 79" 12' and 85*20' E., about 470 miles in length. 
The Northern Circars formerly comprised the tracts of Chicacole Rajahmundry. 
Ellore, Condapilly and Guntoor, the whole of which are now included in the Kistna, 
Godavari, Vizagapatam and Ganjam districts of the Madras Presidency. — (See 
p. 119.) 

Okhmandal. — A small district in the peninsula of Kattywar, province Gujarat, at the north- 
west angle of the peninsula. 

Orissa. — ^A province under the Bengal jurisdiction, comprising the Orissa division, consisting 
of the districts of Balasore, Cuttack and Pooree, and nineteen tributary states. — 
(See p. 53, 54 and 55.) 
Patar. — ^A remarkable plateau on the eastern side of Rajputana. — (See p. 105.) 
Rechna DOAa — ^The plain country lying between tKe Ravi and Chenab rivers of the Punjab. — 
C^^r^p. 23.) 

Rewa Kanta. — ^A tract lying along the north-east of the Gujarat province, of the Bombay 
Presidency, south of Mahikanta, and between the rivers Tapti and Mahi. — (See 
p. 153.) 

ROHILKHAND. — An extensive tract, mostly plain, bounded on the west and south by the river 
Ganges, on the south-east bv Oudh^ on the north-east by Kumaun and Nepal 
native state, and on the north by Bntish Garhwal, comprised within the districts 
of Bijnor, Moradabad, Bareilly, Budaun, Shajahanpur and the Tarai^ under the 
title of the Rohilkhand division. Rohilkhand was ceded to the British by the 
Nawab of Oudh in 1801.— (5^^ p. 30) 

Shaikhawati. — ^A tract comprising the northern portion of the Jeypore native state, in Raj- 
putana. — {See p. 102 and 103.) 

SiND, (from Sindhu^ a collection ol waters).— The northern province of the Bombay Presiden- 
cy, bounded by the Rann of Cutch on the south, by Rajputana on the east, by 
the Punjab on the north-east, by Baluchistan on the north and west, and by the 
Arabian Sea on the south-west. — {See p. 146 and 154.) 

SiND Sagar Doab. — The plain country between the Indus and the Chenab rivers on the 
south and the Indus and the Jhelum, rivers on the north. — (See p. 23.) 

Sirhind. — An extensive tract of the Punjab jurisdiction, stretching east and west, from the 
extreme north-east corner of the Bahawalpur native state to the Umballa district, 
and north and south from the river Sutlej to Harriana, about 220 miles in length 
from east to west, and 160 in breadth from north to south. 

SORATH. — A district in the peninsula of Kattywar, province Gujarat, Bombay Presidency* 
the most southern of the peninsula, bounded by Hallar district on the north, by 
Babriawar on the east, and by Kattywar on the north-east. 

SuNDARBANS. — The southem portion of the Delta of the Ganges in the Bengal jurisdicti on 
This tract may be described as a crowded cluster of densely wooded small marshy 
islands separated by narrow channels and formed by the deposition of the enor- 
mous quantity of earth swept down by the Ganges. This alluvial archipelago 
is about 200 miles in length, and about 75 miles in breadth. An area of 5,340 
square miles, is almost totally irreclaimable. — {See p. 46 and 56.) 

Tarai. — ^A long strip of marshy jungle, stretching along the foot of the sub-Himalayan 
ranges, and between them and the northern plains of India. A deadly malaria 
arises from the whole region, rendering it almost uninhabitable by man, and danger- 
ous to traverse between the months of April and October.— (5^^ p. 30^ 36 and 181.) 

Tenasserim. — ^The southem portion of the British Bumiah province, stretching along the 
eastern coast of the Bay of Bengal, and embracing the districts of Amherst, Tavoy 
and Mergui, in length about 500 miles. — {See p. 86 and 88.) 

Thar, The.— The great sandy desert of north-western India, extending from the Aravallis 
to the Sutlej and the Indus rivers, and from the left bank of the lower Indus in 
Sind, to the north-eastern limit of Rajputana, a length of some 500 miles. This 
desert is called by the natives Thar^ Tkally or Dhat. In Hindu geography it is 
termed marus thuUi^ or the region of death. — {See p. 104.) 



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194 



Thermal Statistical Tables. 



For various Stations in India and the East 







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STAtlOKS, 


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Abu, Mount 




. 64 


75 


73 


69 


70 


Dibrugarh 


62 


74 


8a 


75 


73 


Aden 




• 74 


81 


83 


82 


80 


Dinagepore 
Dodabetta 


66 


86 


8a 


78 


78 


Agra 
Ahmedabad 




6i 


8s 


88 


77 


78 


5« 


57 


53 


52 


53 




73 


i: 


88 


81 


% 


Dum-Dum 


69 


84 


u 


80 


79 


Ahmednagar 




73 


2? 


77 


Erinpura 


55 


81 


76 


75 


Aimere 
AWab 




6S 


87 


80 


80 


Etawah 


60 


82 


87 


76 


76 




66 


83 


8z 


80 


78 


1 Fatehgarh 


61 


83 


?7 


76 


77 


Aligarh 




6t 


83 


89 


77 


78 


1 Ferozepore 


54 


89 


74 


73 


Allahabad 




66 


89 


89 


79 


81 


, French Rocks .. 


U 


83 


76 


76 


78 


Amritsar ^ ^ 




54 


73 


8i 


74 


72 


Furreedpore .. 


80 


82 


79 


77 


Anjarakandi 




8i 


84 


79 


80 


81 


Galle 


80 


8a 


82 


80 


s; 


Arcot 




74 


85 


87 


81 


8a 


Gauhati 


66 


77 


83 


77 


76 


Asni 




59 


79 


90 


76 


76 


Ghazipur 


68 


88 


88 


81 


8. 


Attaremalle 




6S 


67 


65 


6s 


65 


Goal para 


65 


77 


81 


77 


75 


Ava 




69 


8a 


84 


79 


79 


Golaghat 
Gorakhpur 


60 


76 


84 


76 


74 


Azimgarh 
BaduTa 




64 


84 


87 


78 


78 


64 


82 


86 


77 


77 




69 


71 


i; 


72 


7» 


Govindgarh .. 


54 


73 


8s 


2* 


72 


Bankolc 




78 


84 


8x 


8z 


Guntoor 


77 


85 


84 


8a 


82 


Bangalore ^ 




^ 


80 


74 


73 


73 


Gya. 


66 


86 


86 


79 


79 


Banjuvangi 
Bancoorah 




81 


79 


80 


80 


Hamirpur .. 


68 


86 


88 


79 


80 




66 


84 


8s 


76 


78 


Hansi 


58 


8s 


88 


8x 


l". 


Bannu 




53 


73 


?; 


75 


73 


Harihar 


76 


87 


79 


80 


Bareilly 




62 


79 


77 


76 


Hazaribagh 


62 


80 


80 


72 


H 


Baroda 




7« 


89 


8i 


78 


81 


Hong Kong .. 


66 


V 


85 


78 


Barpeta 




65 


75 


82 


81 


76 


Hooghly 


65 


84 


82 


78 


77 


Barrackpore 




69 


83 


84 


79 


79 


Hoshangabad .. 


70 


88 


85 


77 


80 


Batavia 




79 


8S 


79 


78 


79 


Hoshiarpur 


57 


77 


88 


75 


74 


Battikota 




79 


84 


84 


82 


82 


Hyderabad, Dekkan 


75 


^ 


83 


79 


82 


Beawar 




65 


86 


87 


80 


80 


Hyderabad, Sind 


70 


90 


80 


82 


Beerbhoom 




70 


86 


85 


79 


80 


Jacobabad 
Jakatalla 


63 


85 


96 


80 


8t 


Belgaum 
Bellary 




72 


79 


72 


73 


74 


60 


68 


68 


65 


65 




75 


88 


81 


78 


80 


Jakunari 


57 


6a 


63 


59 


60 


Benares 




% 


88 


87 


79 


80 


Jalna 


74 


87 


80 


78 


80 


Berhampore 




82 


85 


78 


78 


Jaunpur 


6^ 


84 


87 


r 


77 


Betul 
Bhagalpur 




61 
66 


80 
87 


ll 


72 
77 


73 


Jessore 
Jhansi 


66 
66 


ll 


U 


81 
79 


IS 


Bhuj 

Bijapur 

Bijnor 




65 


82 


83 


75 


76 


Jhelum 
Jubbulpore 
Jullundur 
Kaladgi 


§3 


l^ 


88 


75 


73 




78 


87 
8t 


82 
89 


ll 


76 


64 
57 


84 
ll 


II 


75 

75 


77 
73 


Bogra 




% 


78 


8i 


77 


75 


73 


80 


74 


79 


Bombay 




II 


82 


81 


81 


Kalsi 


60 


74 


83 


70 


72 


Burdwan 




70 


86 


80 


81 


Karikal 


77 


85 


86 


82 


83 


Burrisal 




66 


il 


fa 


79 


77 


Kartarpur 


60 


77 


89 


79 


76 


Calcutta 




68 


83 


8^ 


80 


Kherwnra 


64 


86 


8a 


76 


77 


Calicut 
Candy 




Si 


85 


79 


80 


81 


Kholapur 


73 


8a 


76 


76 


77 




72 


74 


73 


72 


73 


Kirki 


72 


8a 


77 


77 


77 






80 


84 


79 


80 


81 


Kishanpur 


65 


85 


80 


75 


76 


Canton 
Cawnpore 




g 


8? 


82 
88 


ll 


78 


Kohat 
Kotagiri 


56 
59 


?J 


fs 


76 
61 


15 


Chakrau 
Chandemagore . 




'i 


86 


89 


79 


&> 


Kurnool 
Kurrachee 


U 


S 


u 


81 
79 


Ys 


Chapra 
Cherrapoonjee \ 




84 


85 


76 


77 


Kyoukhpyoo .. 


74 


85 


79 


81 


80 




C4 


64 


68 


64 


63 


lihat .. 


79 


81 


80 


80 


80 


Chittagpng 

Chittor 

Chunar \ 

Cliusan 

Chybassa 

Cochin 

Coconada 

Cohnbatore 

Colombo 

Coonoor ' 

Cuddalore 

Cuddapah 

Dacca 

Dapuli 

Deesa 

Delhi 

Dcra Ghazi Kha 

Dera IsmaU Kha 

Dharwaf 

Dhulia ; 




66 


8^ 


&o 


78 


76 


I^hore 


57 


78 


89 


76 


75 




76 


87 


8S 


79 


82 


I^khimpur 


62 


74 


8a 


7<5 


74 




61 
80 


85 


89 
5^8 


80 
68 


79 


Leia 

Lucknow 
Ludhiana 
Macao 


S3 
59 


ll 

77 


1 


ll 

80 
75 


7a 

It 

7a 




76 
73 


85 
8f 


84 
77 


79 
75 


81 
77 


Madras 
Madura 


IL 


88 


86 
87 


81 
84 


8a 
85 




8a 
68 


81 
68 

II 


«1 

82 
81 


80 

66 

II 


Mahableshwar.. 
Mahu 
Mainpuri 
Mangnldai 


67 

6a 


i 


64 

ll 

81 


74 
77 


67 

ll 

l^ 




^8 

75 


ll 


1^ 


80 
79 


79 
79 


Mangalore 
Manilla 


81 


15 


JS. 


80 
80 


81 
80 




66 


4 


86 


77 


79 


Manipur ... 


6a 


74 


!l 


ll 


I* 


a 
n 


58 
56 
53 

72 

73 


It 

79 
79 
87 


86 
9» 
94 
74 
83 


73 
74 
79 
75 
79 


74 
75 
76 
75 
81 


Manantvadi .. 
Masulipatam .. 
Mateli 
Meerut 
i Mercara 


6a 
79 

70 


7» 

i 

76 


68 
88 

8l 
68 


68 
8t 
76 
76 
7a 


1 

7* 



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Thermal Statistical Tables, — Contimted. 



195 





it 




|| 


il 


1 






F 


c)j| 


r 


1 

2 


Stations. 






^1 


§ 
\ 

2 


Stations. 




1! 


1-^ 


P- 
** 


s 
J 


Hervui 
Mooltan 


78 


81 


79 


79 


79 


1 

1 Rawalpindi .. 


• 54 


72 


87 


73 


72 


59 


77 


II 


79 


77 


j Rungpore 

! Ross Island .. 


. 66 


80 


82 


80 


77 


Monzhyr 


65 


85 


79 


79 


• 79 


81 


80 


79 


8^ 


MoorUiedabad .. 


67 


85 


86 


81 


80 


Saharanpur 


. 58 


79 


88 


76 


?? 


Montgomery 


57 


79 


90 


77 


76 


Salem 


•! 77 


8; 


82 


80 


Moradabad .. 




80 


86 


75 


75 


. Samalkota 


.' 71 


• 83 


79 


73 


77 


Mount Zioa 


58 


63 


60 


59 


60 


Samarang 


. 81 


82 


8i 


84 


82 


Muttra 


64 


83 


89 


79 


76 


Sandoway 


. 7« 


80 


79 


79 


77 


Mozuflfeipore 


6i 


81 


85 


76 


7? 


Satara 


• 72 


80 


U 


74 


75 


M^-menstngh 


65 


78 


83 


?? 


7<5 


Saugor 


. 65 


84 


73 


77 


Mirzapur 


63 


83 


88 


73 


; Sehorc 


. 64 


83 


83 


'i 


76 


Nagpur 
Nakodar 




80 
78 


u 


80 
77 


79 
75 


Shahpur 
Shahjahanpur .. 


. 55 
. 59 


76 
77 


u 


75 
75 


Narsinghpur 


62 


81 


83 


76 


76 


Shanghai 


. 42 


57 


78 


66 


61 


Naztraghat 


63 


73 


82 


77 


74 


Shervaroy Hills 


. 65 


70 


68 


66 


67 


Neemuck 


67 


85 


81 


V. 


78 


Shillong 








62 




Nellore 


76 


84 


88 


?i 


Sholapur 


; 76 


86 


83 


77 


81 


NoakhoUy 


68 


81 


82 


79 


Sibsagar 


. 62 


74 


83 


77 


74 


Nowgong < Assam; 


64 


ij 


87 


77 


76 


Sikandrabad .. 


.1 70 


84 


It 


if 


11 


Nowgong (Bundelkband) . . 


64 


84 


78 


75 


Singapore 
Silchar fC'achar 


.' 79 


81 


Nowshera 


5a 


72 


99 


73 


72 


•1 ^5 


77 


83 


'5 


76 


Nurelia 


50 


60 


11 


59 


57 


1 Sirur 


.' 7a 


84 


78 


76 


75 


NussMrabad ., 


60 


82 


77 


7<5 


' Sitapnr 


.* 64 


88 


86 


78 


79 


Ootacamuad 


5» 


59 


57 


55 


56 


1 Sultanpiur 


. 63 


88 


87 


78 


It 


Orai 


69 


89 


V. 


79 


82 


I Sural 


• 75 


87 


85 


81 


Palembang 


80 


81 


81 


81 


Sylhet 


. 68 


78 


82 


77 


76 


Pallamkota 


79 


86 


85 


83 


83 


Sialkot 


• 53 


74 


88 


74 


72 


Patlam 


' 77 


82 


81 


8^ 


88 


St. Thomas' Mount 


. 80 


87 


89 


84 


85 


Patna 


63 


83 


86 


79 


73 


Tavoy 


78 


82 


79 




80 


Penang 


80 


83 


82 


80 


81 


Tezpur 


1 62 


74 


82 


76 


74 


Peshawar 


55 


72 


90 


74 


73 


Thayetmyo ... 
Tinnevelly 


1 7* 


85 


81 


80 


80 


PhaUan 


75 


85 


80 


77 




81 


87 


86 


84 


85 


Poena 


71 


80 


78 


t 


76 ' 


Tipperah 


66 


80 


82 


78 


77 


Pooree 


72 


84 


85 


81 


Tirhoot 


61 


81 


85 


78 


76 


Pondicherry 


82 


85 


86 


85 


85 


Tounpngoo 


72 


84 


80 


l^ 


79 


Pabna 


68 


83 


84 


79 


79 


Trichinopoly .. 


82 


88 


86 


83 


85 


PunamalU 


?? 


82 


84 


80 


81 


Trincomali 


80 


85 


86 


84 


84 


Purandhar 


78 


67 


% 


70 


Trivandnim 


79 


82 


78 


78 




Pumeah 


64 


80 


85 


77 


Umbnlla 


57 


if 


88 


81 


76 


Haiamundry 


76 


86 


84 


82 


82 


Vlngorla 


78 


79 


80 


80 


Rajkot 


7« 


86 


85 


80 


81 


Vizagapatam . . 
WaziraWd .. 


75 


88 


86 


83 


83 


Raraandnig 


71 


78 


7> 


71 


\l 


57 


77 


90 


77 ; 


75 


Rampore Bauleah 


67 


82 


84 


79 


>VeIIington 


66 


67 


69 


67 


i^ 


Rangoon 


76 


85 


79 


81 


80 


Zion, Mount .. 


58 


63 


60 


59 , 


60 



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196 



RELIGIONS AND PEOPLES OF INDIA. 



BRIEF GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

About three-fourths of the vast population of India comprising upwards of two hundred 
and forty-two millions, {See p. 9 and 10,) are Hindus professing the rdigion of Brahma in its 
many different forms, and although sub-divided into many sects, are more or less exclusively 
devoted to that form of worship. 

The doctrines of the more ancient religion of the Hindus are contained in the Vedas^ or 
four sacred books, each composed of two parts, one comprising forms of worship, the other, 
moral and religious instruction. These Vedas are of very high antiquity, being supposed to 
date from the fourteenth century] before the Christian era. Their primary doctrine teaches 
Theism^ or the worship of a self-existent Supreme Being, to whom all are subject, ' There is in 
truth but one Deity, the Supreme Spirit, the Lord of the Universe, whose work is the universe*. 

The PuranaSy the other sacred books of the Hindus, as well as the Institutes of Menu^ 
are compositions of later date, and are the exponents of modem Brahminism. The Puranas 
are eighteen in number, and were mostly written in support of the doctrines of particular sects, 
and the supremacy of the priesthood. They are for the most part legendary in their character. 
The pure Theism of the ancient Hindu faith as defined in the Vedas, has become developed into 
an elaborate polytheistic system, the most gigantic and degrading. BrakmOy the creative 
principle, Vishnu^ the preserving principle, and Siva^ the destroying principle, being r^arded as 
a Triune manifestation of the divinity, and with other personified attributes and energies, hav- 
ing been made the objects of worship in an infinite variety of forms. Subordinate to these are 
many lesser divinities regarded as goddesses ; there is a goddess of learning and eloquence 
(Saraswatt)y a goddess of wealth (Lakshmt)^ the goddesses Parvati^ Bkowani or Durga^ names 
representing the acting powers of evil and destruction, as well as others. Of the Hindu sects, the 
most influential and numerous are . the followers of Siva and Vishnu, The worship of Siva 
prevails mostly among the members of the upper classes, especially in Mysore and the Maratha 
provinces, while that of Vishnu prevails among the Hindus of Bengal, the North -Western 
Provinces and Oudh. A large portion of the sacred writings of the Hindus is occupied with 
the history of the various incarnations (avatars) of this latter deity. The votaries of Siva 
and Vishnu are distinguished by certain colored marks on the forehead, those of the Siva 
sect being horizontal, while those of the Vishnuvites are perpendicular. 

The leading dogmas of the Brahminical faith are, the supremacy of the priesthood, and 
metempsychosis or the transmigration of the soul after death. Pilgrimages to remote and 
holy places, and penances and offerings to the priesthood, are held in high esteem ; the avoid- 
ance of impure or forbidden food, especially the flesh of the cow or bull, which is considered 
sacred, and the preservation of caste, are among the most important moral duties enjoined on 
the Hindu. In no country does the religion of the inhabitants appear so prominent in every 
act as in Hindustan. It pervades the entire frame of civil society, and mixes itself up with 
every concern of life, public, private or domestic. ' The institution of caste, so characteristic of 
Hindu society throughout nearly the whole country, by which all classes remain, from father 
to son, occupying the same pursuits and positions in life, is nowhere pursued to such (often 
arbitrary and merciless) ramifications as in India. Purity of caste being incapable of acquisi- 
tion, and therefore to be preserved at all hazards and under the most trying circumstances. 

In the outset the Hindus were divided into four great classes or castes, the Brahmans 
or sacerdotal class ; the KshetriyaSy warriors and rulers ; Vaisiyas^ capitalists, traders and 
farmers, and Sudras^ laborers, artizans, and menial servants. These great divisions though here- 
ditary, impassable and indefeasible, are now, however, purely theoretical, there being, practically 
an immense number of various castes, whose members intermarry only among themselves, and 
abstain from associating with those of other castes. Every caste and sub-division of a caste, 
forming a little distinct society in the general community. 

The Brahmans and Kshetriyas are regarded as greatly superior to the rest of the 
population, and are distinguished by wearing a certain cord termed * the thread.* The' follow- 



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Religions and Peoples of India,— Continued. 197 

ing passages denote what obsequious reverence the Brahman s claim for their order : ' A 
Brahman, whether learned or ignorant, is a powerful divinity.* (Inst, of Menu.) * Those 
excellent Brahmans who are guilty of such crimes as theft, are offenders against themselves, 
not others.' — * Brahmans are masters of the Kshetriyab, Vaishiyas and Sudras ; they are 
masters of one another, and to be worshipped, being earthly gods.* {Padma Purana.) * What- 
ever exists in the universe is all in effect, though not in form, the wealth of the Brahman, 
since the Brahman is entitled to it all, by his primogeniture and eminence of birth.*—* The 
Brahman eats but his own food, wears but his own apparel, and bestows but his own in alms. 
He alone deserves to possess the whole earth.* (Ibid.) 

The military profession is held to be nearly as honorable as the sacerdotal, and numerous 
Brahmans are found filling its ranks, while the mercantile classes are regfirded with much l^ss 
consideration. 

The spread of education is gradually undermining the influence of caste prejudices. 

Other forms of religion are those of the BuddhistSy Jcdns^ Sikhs and Mahomedans ; the 
last it is unnecessary to refer to, beyond stating, that they consist chiefly of two sects, the 
Shiahs and the Sunnis; the former regarding Ali as the successor of Mahomet, and equal to 
him in dignity, and who reject tradition ; the latter insisting on the supremacy of Mahomet 
overall created beings, and acknowledging tradition. The Mahomedan religion was founded 
in Arabia, and introduced into India by the Arabs in the sixth and seventh centuries. 

Buddhism^ which now prevails over all Central and Eastern Asia, appears to have originat- 
ed, and at one time to have extensively prevailed in Hindustan. It is believed that Buddhism, 
and Brahmanism are but two offsets from a primitive religion, which once prevailed over the 
whole of Asia beyond the Indus. Being opposed to the polytheism of the Brahmans, Buddhism 
became subjected tg considerable persecution at their hands, and is now all but extinct in India, 
it is, however, professed by a large number of the inhabitants of Arakan, Burmah, Bhutan 
Nepal and the island of Ceylon. Though almost extinguished in Hindustan, the religion of 
Buddha, the * wise*, the * enlightened,* is still, numerically speaking, the prevailing religion of 
the world. It has now been in existence for nearly 2,500 years, and its adherents are estimated 
at upwards of 400 millions, or more than a fourth of the human race. The Buddhists, while 
they reject the multitudinous pantheon of the Hindus, admit an indefinite number of incarna- 
tions of Buddh, who is supposed to animate in succession the bodies of their chief Lofnas or 
priests. They believe in the eternity of matter, and the supremacy of intelligence as a property 
of matter. They deny the authority of the sacred books of the Hindus, do not acknowledge 
caste, and have no respect for fire, but have great regard for animal life, and live much in 
monasteries. Buddhism is practically a system of Atheism and Nihilism. The Nirvdna, to 
which the Buddhist aspires, is absolute nothing. Buddhas are beings (of whom there may 
be many), who have raised themselves by austerities of all kinds to a state of apathy, and 
then have evolved certain doctrines and sacred books. The founder of Buddhism was 
Sakya Muni or Gotama, who died 543 B. a The sacred books of the Buddhists are called 
Tri-pitaka, (three caskets^) 

The religion of the Jcdns and Sikhs is briefly described in the following alphabetical list 
of the principal classes of the different peoples and tribes inhabiting India. 

There are marked differences in appearance among the native races in different parts of 
the country, and these depend partly on race, and partly, no doubt, on climate. The less acces- 
sible parts are still inhabited by people hardly removed from the lowest forms of savage life, 
while the coast, the plains, and great river valleys have been the seat of civilization from time 
immemorial. The inhabitants of Northern, North- Western and Central India, generally, are 
handsome, tall, of fair complexion, well developed, honest, manly and of more than average in- 
tellect. They make excellent soldiers and are ingenious in certain manufactures and handi- 
crafts. The same general description applies, with some marked exceptions, to the inhabitants 
of the mountain districts in other parts of India, though they are less tall. On the other hand, 
the people dwelling in the lower provinces of Bengal, in the river valleys near the mouths of 
streams, and in the Deccan, are lower in stature, darker in colour, less developed physically, less 



A 2 



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198 Religions and Peoples of India, — Continued. 

sincere and honest, and less favourable specimens of the human family. All the races, however, 
are simple in their habits, active, capable of enduring much fatigue, and much attached to their 
homes. Of the different races, the Bengalis, though weak in body, and wanting in moral 
courage, are, intellectually, the most capable of considerable and rapid advancement in the 
ordinary arts of civilized life, and there is a certain amount of cunning natural to them, which 
makes up for their timidity. 

List of a few of the principal Indian Peoples and Tribes. 

ABARS. — ^A wild mountain tribe occupying a tract of country to the north of Upper 
Assam. The centre of the tract is about Latitude 28* lo' N., and Longitude 95' vJ E. 

AKHAS, — ^A wild tribe inhabiting the mountainous country, situated on the northern 
boundary of Assam, and the eastern boundary of Bhutan. The centre of the tract is about 
Latitude 2f id N., and Longitude 92" 40^ E. 

ARABS, — In Bombay chiefly, generally traders from the Red Sea and Persian Gulf. A 
great number are also to be found in the Nizam's territory or Hyderabad, who are permanent- 
ly settled there, and are employed chiefly as mercenaries in the military forces of that state. 

ARMENIANS, — Chiefly refugees from former Persian or Turkish persecution, and gener- 
ally merchants and tradesmen settled in the principal towns and cities of India. 

BADAKS or ^//^Z^^A"^.— Hereditary thieves inhabiting the forests of Northern OUdh, 
and the banks of the Chambal river. They lead a nomadic life and have few Hindu prejudices. 

BAJIKARS. — The gipseys and jugglers of India, chiefly met with in Upper India. 

BANIAS, — The Hindu trading and banking class, the most influential as well as the' 
most despised of natives, quiet and well behaved, but fond of litigation. 

BANJARAS or LADANAS.— The carriers of the country, chiefly of grain, they own 
immense herds of bullocks and live generally in the open ; the railways %ave reduced this 
class considerably, and their existence in the future is only a question of time. Their dress and 
usages are peculiar. 

BANRAS. — Tribes separated from the Newars of Nepal, and following many of the 
customs of the Bhuiias, 

BHA TS, — Wandering minstrels found in Gujarat and Upper India, and exercising much 
influence over the population, but especially over the Rajputs, 

BHA TTIS, — ^A predatory tribe of Rajput descent, inhabiting Bhattiana and the desert 
in Rajputana, from the Sirsa and Hissar districts up to the Indus. 

BHILS. — ^Rude native tribes supposed to be the aboriginal people of Central India and 
Gujarat, now inhabiting the mountainous parts of Gujarat, Khandesh and Malwa, and the 
hills along the Nerbudda and Tapti rivers. 

BORAS, — ^A trading sect of Mahomedans largely scattered over Gujarat and the Dec- 
can, of supposed Arab descent, and resembling Jews in features and character. They are in 
general, industrious, wealthy, and influential members of society. 

CHARANS.—K race of carriers of heavy goods, and grain, also cattle dealers ; they are 
sometimes hired by travellers as an escort in the wilder parts of India. 

COLES. — Aboriginal tribes inhabiting the northern part of Orissa. They are also called 
Hosy and are semi-barbarous, but hospitable, and show a love of truth, honesty and a willing- 
ness to oblige. 

COOLIS.—The aboriginal tribes of Gujarat and Western India. A manly and hard- 
working people, but ferocious, much addicted to drunkenness, and once formidable robbers. 

DA UDPUTRAS (or sons of David). — ^A fair and handsome Mahomedan race, number- 
ing about 50,000. They crossed the Indus from Shikarpur in the reign of Aurungzebe, and 
took forcible possession of the country which they now occupy on the left bank of the Sutlej, 
called Bahawalpur. 

DHENWARS.—TYit husbandmen and fishers of the western districts of Nepal. 

GARANGS.—A Buddhist race, leading a pastoral life in Nepal, and shifting their abodes 



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Religions and Peoples of lndia,^'Contintied. 199 

between the mountains and valleys in summer and winter; some are miners and traders. 

GAROS, — A purely agricultural people, the inhabitants of the Garo Hills district of 
Assam, similar to the Mechis or Cacharis. A robust, active, strong and muscular race, capable 
of enduring a great amount of exertion and fatigue, remarkable for their ugliness and scarcity 
t)f beard, generally truthful, easily excitable, and then revengeful, cruel and blood-thirsty. 

GONDS, — The aboriginal inhabitants of a part of Central India formerly called Gond 
wana ; they are blood-thirsty, cruel and revengeful, but an athletic and well-looking race, 
speaking a language radically different firom Sanscrit. 

GUJARS. — The inhabitants and husbandmen of Gujarat, as well as many parts of 
Northern India, and the Punjab. 

GURKHAS, — A hardy, brave, active and enterprising people, dominant in Nepal and in 
the hill countries westward. They are of short stature, but make excellent soldiers, and are 
descendants of the Hindu refugees from Mahomedan invasion, who mingled with the Tartar 
and Chinese people of the country. 

JAINS or JAINAS. — A religious sect dating firom the sixth century,- numerous in 
Gujarat, Khandesh, Rajputana and Kanara, professing the doctrines, and supposed to be an 
-offshoot, of the Buddhists, but admitting caste, — which Buddhism rejects, — and the worship of 
many of the Hindu deities in addition to their own saints, twenty four in number, called 
TirihankaraSy i>. tkose^ who by ascetic practices^ have crossed the ocean of human existence^ 
whom they regard as superior to the gods. Their priests are of all castes. The Jains have 
always been a learned people. Both Jains and Buddhists use Pali as their sacred language. 

yARIJAS — A fine robust and warlike race, but proud, cruel and dissipated ; they are 
the ruling class in Cutch. 

yATS. — ^A turbulent and very ancient race who probably migrated originally from Turkestan, 
occupying a great part of the North- Western Provinces and Rajputana. They still retain the 
warlike and nomadic habits of the people of that region. 

yEWS, — Numerous in Western India, found also in Calcutta, and Rangoon. Those of 
Bombay call themselves Bani-Israel, and are probably descendants of the ten tribes, and 
of higher consideration than the others. At Cochin they are of two denominations, the Black 
Jews of very ancient date, and the White Jews, more recent, who regard the others as 
slaves. 

KATARIS or JCATADIS.^-PiXi ancient race of Northern Konkan, Bombay Presidency, 
living on the outskirts of the villages, and held in abhorrence by the higher castes of Hindus 

KATTIS. Natives of the peninsula of Kattywar in Gujarat, considered one of the royal 
races of India, but now greatly reduced. They are half civilised, and were once robbers and 
pirates. 

KHASIAS, — The inhabitants of the Khasia and Jaintia Hills district of Assam. A short 
stout and athletic race, affable, gentle and cheerful in disposition, industrious, and capable of 
enduring much fatigue. 

KHONDS. — Tribes inhabiting the hilly districts of Orissa, partly civilised and practising 
agriculture. An intelligent race, robust and muscular, having a strong love of independence 
but vindictive, and addicted to drunkenness. 

KOTARS, — A peculiar but industrious race, exercising certain handicrafts, and having no 
caste prejudices. Found in the Nilgiri district 

KUNBIS, — An agricultural tribe inhabiting the south and midland parts of Gujarat 

KURMIS, — A class of cultivators found in the North-Westem Provinces, well-known for 
their industrious and peaceful habits. 

MARA THAS, — A numerous and powerful race, bold, active and industrious, who originally 
occupied the north-western part of the Deccan, but conquered a great part of Northern and 
Central India, confined now more particularly to the central and southern part of the Bombay 
Presidency, of which they form the majority of the population. Their power was broken by 
Ahmadshah, Abdalli, king of Kabul, at the battle of Panipat in 1761. 



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200 Religions and Peoples of ^ India, — Continued. 

MARA VAS.—A people of considerable antiquity, inhabiting a tract of country on the 
extreme southern coast near Cape Comorin. 

MARWARIS.—Tht trading class of Jodhpore or Marwar, found throughout India. 

MECHISy or CACHARIS,—h tribe widely scattered all over north-eastern Bengal and 
throughout Assam, called Mechis in the former, and Cacharis in the latter. Of migratory habits, 
able-bodied and well behaved, honest and trustworthy. They make good soldiers and form a 
strong element in the military and police of those parts, and have no caste prejudices. 

MERS.—The, inhabitants of the district called Merwara, in the Aravalli Hills of Raj- 
putana {See page loi.) They are descendants of one of the original peoples of India, and arc 
a savage and independent race. 

MIKIRS, — A tribe inhabiting the hills in Nowgong, Assam, undoubtedly the most peace- 
ful and industrious of hil tribes. A fine athletic race, but devoid of personal courage. 

MOPLAHS, or MAPILAS,— The Mahomedan inhabitants of Malabar, in the Madras 
Presidency. A wealthy, intelligent and enterprising race, but fanatical and troublesome. 

MUGS or MAGHS, — The indigenous people of Arakan, short in stature, hardy, inofiensive 
and trustworthy, with round, flat faces and a copper complexion. 

NAG AS. — Tribes virtually independent, extending from North Cachar as far as the 
Dihing river in the extreme eastern point of Assam. They all belong to the Indo-Chinese stock 
speaking various dialects, which differ so much, that their own villages, lying scarcely a day's 
journey apart, can only hold communication by means of a foreign tongue. The term Nc^a 
is probably derived from the Bengali word Nangta^ meaning nakedy or from the Sanskrit word 
nagOy a snake. The principal clans are the Angamis^ the Rengmas and the Kachas, the first 
named being the most numerous and powerful. An athletic, and by no means a bad looking 
race, braVe and warlike, but also treacherous and vindictive. 

NA VARS, — ^The aristocracy of Malabar, formerly hereditary soldiers, now engaged in 
handicraft. Numerous and influential 

NAMBUR/S.—A class of Brahmans, considered to be aboriginal and very highly re- 
garded, inhabiting southern India. 

NA YAKS,— A wild tribe inhabiting the forests between the Mahi and the Nerbudda rivers 
in Rewakanta, Gujarat. 

NEWARS, — The original inhabitants of the fertile parts of Nepal before its conquest by 
the Gurkhas. They are an industrious, ingenious, peaceable and able-bodied race, chiefly 
engaged in agriculture, trading and handicraft. They are Buddhists, but do not acknowledge^ 
the Lamas of Thibet— (^y^f^ page i8i.) 

OORIYAS, — The original inhabitants of Orissa, from whom the province takes its name. 
They are a timid, effeminate, dishonest and dissolute race, but industrious. 

PANARIS, — The inhabitants of the mountains, or hill men. 

PARSIS, — The descendants of a large colony of fire- worshippers, who left Persia in con- 
sequence of Moslem persecution and settled in Bombay, Surat and Gujarat. Many are now rich 
merchants and land-owners, others are shop-keepers, artizans and domestic servants. They 
are very hospitable and liberal, especially to their own people. — {See p. 159.) 

PA THANS—Feop\e of Afghan descent, inhabiting the North- Western frontier of the 
Punjab, Bhopal and other parts of India. — {See p. 173-174) 

PO VINDAHS, — A class of Afghans, who are at once agriculturists, traders and warriors. — 
{See p. 170-176.) 

RAJPUTS, (Sons of kings). — The descendants of the ancient Hindu princes, and the 
dominant population of that portion of India on the north-west called Rajputana. They are a 
tall, proud, vigorous and athletic race, and sometimes make excellent soldiers. They are in- 
ordinately addicted to opium, and are fit for nothing until they take it, and after its effects have 
passed, are little better than idiots, until the dose be repeated. Indulgence in this baneful habit 
is more necessary to the Rajput than his food, and to eat opium together is the most inviolable 
pledge. 



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Religions and Peoples of India,— Continued, 201 

RAMUSIS,—Pi predatory tribe in the neighborhood of Poona and Satara, in the Bombay 
Presidency. They are fatalists and have no fear of law or punishment 

ROHILLAS, — A people of Afghan descent, addicted to agriculture as well as arms, occupy- 
ing the tract called Rohilkhand, named after them. They are a tall and handsome race, of a 
comparatively fair complexion, animated and intelligent, but utterly devoid of truthfulness. Crimes 
are frequent amongst them, and perjury is almost universal The Rohillas entered Hindustan 
early in the eighteenth century and conquered the district which bears their name. They were 
completely defeated by the British at the battle of Katra in 1774, an event which brought the 
Rohilla sway to an end. 

SAURIASy or S AURAS, — A wild but harmless and peaceful race inhabiting the southern 
part of Orissa, in the Bengal jurisdiction. 

SHAIKHAWATIS,—K tribe of Rajputs inhabiting the northern district of the Jeypore 
state, which is named named after them — ,(See p. 103.) 

SIKHS. (Disciples.) — A religious sect founded by one Nanak^ the Guru or leader, in the 
fifteenth century, and occupying the Punjab, principally Sirhind. They were oiiginally pure 
Theisis but have since much degenerated, regarding their founder as worthy of divine honors. 
Their religion is chiefly confined to the Punjab, and is an heretical form of the Brahminical 
faith, its chief characteristic being the intolerance of its followers, a regard for animal life, 
chiefly in reference to the cow, which is held sacred, a belief in transmigration, and a total 
abstinence from tobacco ; but Bhangs opium and spirituous liquors are freely used. They have 
no caste prejudices and are divided into several sects, the two principal of which are, the ^KhcU' 
sd or old Sikhs, and the * Singh^ or lions. The sacred book of the Sikhs, is called the 
Granth. At first they were quiet and unostentatious, but on the murder of one of their 
Gurus, they drew the sword, and one sect commenced to acquire temporal power, taking the 
name of ' Singhs, while the rest remained quiet under the name of *• Khalsa.' All are distin- 
guished alike by their hatred of the Mahomedans. They are a tall, vigorous and athletic race, 
and make excellent soldiers. 

SONTHALS. — A primitive people inhabiting the portion of the Bhagalpur division of 
Bengal, known as the Sonthal Pergunnahs, (See p. 52.) They are an uncouth race, but make 
excellent navvies. They number about 1,250,00a 

SUDAS, — ^A rude people, probably of Rajput lineage, chiefly shepherds, living in grass 
huts in the Thar or Great Desert of Rajputana, in a state of great privation and misery. Their 
principal source of income consists in the sale of their daughters to rich Mahometans, and 
to the Jarijas of Cutch. 

THAGS. — A confederacy of professsional murderers found chiefly in Central India, and 
devout worshippers of the goddess Kali, They have been very greatly reduced in numbers, 
and may now be regarded as almost extinct, owing to the severe measures of the British Govern- 
ment for their suppression. 

TIYARS, — Cultivators on the Malabar coast, much despised by the other inhabitants. 
TUDAS or TUNDAVERS, — A small, primitive and nomadic tribe, occupying some 
of the highest valleys of the Nilgiris. They are ignorant of the mythology, language, manners 
and customs of the Hindus, and are a tall, athletic race, of a bold appearance, but quiet and 
honest. Their*wealth consists of large herds of buffaloes, which they tend and milk, exchang- 
ing the produce of their dairies for grain. 
URIYAS,—{See Ooriyas,) 

WAGHIAS, — A predatory tribe of Rajputs found in the Kattywar peninsula, Gujarat. 
WARALIS, — A wild tribe speaking the Maratha language, and living in the forests of 
Northern Konkan, Bombay Presidency. 

YANADIS, — A wild savage race inhabiting the country on the Coromandel Coast, in the 
vicinity of the Nellore district, Madras Presidency. In habits religion and language they are 
quite distinct from their neighbours ; they are short in stature and of black complexion, capa- 
ble of enduring great fatigue, and remarkably faithful and honest. 



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^UTH:OI^ITIES CONSULTED. 
> ^0^ < 

Administration Reports ftx)m 1872-73 to 1878-79, of the Punjab, North-Westem Provinces and 
Oudh, Bengal, Assam, Central Provinces, Hyderabad Assigned Districts, British Burmah, 
Bombay Presidency, Madras Presidency, Mysore, Coorg, Rajputana and Central India 
Agencies. 

Statement exhibiting the Moral and Material Progress and Condition of India, 1872-73, pre- 
pared for the House of Commons, June 1874. 

Statistical Abstract relating to British India, 13th Number. 

Government Gazettes of the several Provinces to date. 

The Meteorology of India, 1877. 

Thornton's " Gazetteer of India.*' 

Gazetteers of the North-Westem Provinces, Oudh, Mysore, Cooing, Berar, Rajputana, Bombay 
Presidency, British Burmah, Central Provinces and Aden. 

Hunter's " Statistical Account of Bengal, Behar, Chota-Nagpore and Orissa." 

Hunter's " Statistical Account of Assam." 

Standing Information regarding the Administration of the Madras Presidency. 

Aitcheson's Treaties : Last edition. 

Gazetteer of Southern India and the Straits Settlements. 

Blackie's " Imperial Gazetteer." 

Thuillier's " Manual of Surveying." 

Schlagintweit's ** India and High Asia," Vol., Meteorology. 

** Geography of India," Allen's Series, and Laurie's Educational Course. 

The last published General Maps of the Indian Survey Department. 



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ALTHABETICAL INDEX, 



OR 



LIST OF PRINCIPAL INDIAN NAMES, 

COMPILED FROM THE PUBLISHED GOVERNMENT LISTS- 



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L 



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INDEX ABBREVIATIONS. 



a. 

B. 
B. B. 

B. P. 
b,f. 
Bo. P. 
ca, 
cant, 
cap. 

C. LA. 
C P. 
cr, 

c. s, 
d,c. 
dis. 
div. 

/ 

fr. 

t 

h, 

H. A. D. 

hod. 

h. s. 

i. 

^khal. 

I. 

It. houssy 

ffU 



Assam. 

Agency. 

Bengal. 

British Burmah. 

Bengal Presidency. 

Battle field. 

Bombay Presidency. 

CanaL 

Cantonment. 

Capital of a District or State 

Central India Agency. 

Central Provinces. 
Creek. 

Civil Station. 
Division of Country. 
District 
Division. 
Estate. 
Feudatory. 
Forest Reserve- 
Feudatory State. 
Fort. 

Hyderabad (Nizam's.) 
Hill. 

Hyderabad Assigned Districts* 
Hobli. 
Hot-Spring. 
Island. 

aghir. 

"■ al or Creek. 
Lake. 

Light-house. 
Mount or Mountain. 



fih^ 



M. P. 
m. r. 
n, d, c. 
ft. n. 

N. W. P. 
o.d. 



o. n, 
P. 

par. 

p.h.i 

p.p. 

Pr. 

P.s. 

r. 

R.A. 

r. s. 

ru. 

s, 

sdn. 

s.d. 

sh. 

sub. 

t. 

t.c. 

t.s. 

teL s. 

tal 

tern. 

ter. 

to. 

Si 



d. 



Madras Presidency. 

Mountain range. 

Natural Division of Country. 

Native Name. 

North- Western Provinces. 

Old Division. 

Old Native Division. 

Punjab. 

Pass. 

Pargana. 

Place of historical interest. 

Place of Pilgrimage. 

Province. 

Police Station. 

River. 

Ramutana Agency. 

Railway Station. 

Ruins. 

State. 

Sanatarium. 

Sub-Division. 

Seat of Government 

Shrine. 

Suburb. 

Town. 

Tract of Country. 

Tributary State. 

Telegraph Station. 

Taluk. 

Temple. 

Temtory. 

Tope. 

Zamindari. 



A^/.— Where no letter follows a name, that name is a Tawn^ or Village. 



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Alphabetical Index. 



Abad, Hyderabad dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Abaipur, JessoreflTw, B. 

Abanshathjo Takiar, Karachi dis^ Bo. P. 

Abar, h. Northern tribes, A. 

Abartak, par^ Cuttack dis^ Orissa, B. 

Abazai, Ji. and cant, Peshawar dis^ P. 

Abbigen, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Abbottabad, cap, and cant, Hazara dis^ P. 

Abdulshah Changal, /./. C.I.A. 

Abhana, Damoh dis, C.P. 

Abha]mil, Backergunge dis^ B. 

Abhaypur, A. 

Abhaypur, par, Monghyr dis, B, 

Abhona, Nasik dis^ Bo. P. 

Abidabad, A. 

Abiraman, Madura dis, M. P. 

Abji, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P, 

Ablur, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Abohar, Sirsa dis, P. 

Abraho, /. Thar Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Abrasa, Cutch s. Bo. P. 

Abruwala, Gujranwala dhy P. 

Abu, Mt., cani, and san, Sirohee s, R. A. 

AbuNala,r. N.W.P. 

Abupur, Backergunge ^w, B. 

Achala Basanta, ru. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B, 

Achalda, Etawah <//j, N.W.P. 

Achalganj, Unao^w, Oudh, N.W.P. 

Achalia, Rajpipla s, Rewakanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Achandevilantan, Tinnevelli dis, M.P. 

Achanta, Godavari dis, M.P. 

Acharapakam, Chingleput dis, M.P. 

Achenkoil, /. r. and tern, Travankor s, M.P, 

Achnera, Agra dis, N.W.P. 

Achra, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P, 

Achrol, Jeypore s. R.A. 

Adabari, Darrang dis, A. 

Adalaj, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Adamdighi, c,s, Bogra dis, B. 

Adampur, Azamgarh dis, N.W.P, 

Adampur, JuUondur dis, P. 

Adampur, A. 

Adamwahan, Mooltan dis, P. 

Adapur, Chumparun dis, B. 

Addanki, Nellore ^w, M.P. 

Adegaon, r. Chhindwara dis, C.P. 

Aden, cant, and dis, Aiabia, Bo. P. 

Adevi Avulapalli, m, Kadapa dis, M.P, 

Adhammi, Bannu dijSt P. 

Adhar, Nagpur dis, C.P. 

Adhara, Shahabad dis, Behar B. 

Adharupea, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Adhegam,^. Thar Parkar ^w, Sind, Bo. P. 

Adh^am, Thar Parkar ^tf, Sind, Bo. P. 

Adhibagh, Mooltan dis, P. 

Adhd, Wagad dis, Cutch s. Bo. P. 

Adhwara, r. Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Adirampatam, Tanjore dis, M.P, 

Adial, Chanda dis, C.P. 

Adivra, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Adjai, r. Burdwan and Beerbhoom dis^ 6. 

Adoni, Bellary dis, M.P. 

Adrampet, Tanjore dis, M.P. 

Adur, Dharwar ^i>. Bo. P. 

Aduturai, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Adyar, Madras, M.P. 



A. 

Aeng, /. and /. Arrakan pr, B. B. 

Afz^arh, Bijnor dis, N.W.P. 

Afzalpur, h, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Afzalpur, Gwalior j. C.I.A. 

Agamani, Goalpara dis, A. 

Aganampudi, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Agar, Akola dis, H. A. D. 

Agar, cant, and dis, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Agar, e, Sankhera Mewas, Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

Agar, r. Bilaspur </ix, C.P. 

Agari, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Agaria, Jubbulpore dis, C.P. 

Agarpara, 24-Pergunnas dis, B. 

Agarpur, Backergunge dis, B. 

Agartala, cap, Hill Tipperah, B. 

Agashi, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Agashiv, Satara^/x, Bo. P. 

Aghara, par, Durbhunga dis, B. 

Aghmo, /. Thar Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P, 

Aghnashini, r. Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Agia, Goalpara </tV, A. 

Agolai, Jodhpore s, R.A. 

Agon, par, MirzapuT dis, N.W.P. 

Agra, cap, div, dts, and cant, N.W.P. 

Agra, ru, Tessore dis, B. 

Agra Barknera, ThakurcUe, Bhopal s, C.I.A. 

Agradwip, i, Nuddea dis, B. 

Agraharavallalur, Coimbatore dis, M.P. 

Agri, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Agroha, Hissar</t>, P. 

Agror, Hazara dis, P. 

Agsauli, Aligarh^fV, N.W.P. 

Agumbe,/. South Canara dis, M.P. 

Agumbe, Shimoga</w, Mysore, M.P. 

Agumb^hat, pcus, Shimoga dis, Mysore, M.P. 

Agunmukhi, r, Backerc[unge dis, B. 

Agiistiswar, m, Travankor x. M.P. 

Aham China Tali, A. 

Ahan, Aligarh du, N.W.P. 

Ahar, Bulandshahr dis, N.W.P. 

Ahias, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Ahilasthan, /./. Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Ahilwara, par, Durbhanga dis, B. 

Ahira, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Ahiri, %, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Ahirpur, Etawah dis, N.W.P. 

Ahis, par, Durbhunga dis, B. 

Ahiyari, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Ahmadabad, Jhelum dis, P. 

Ahmadpur, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Ahmadgarh, Bulandshahr dis, N.W.P. 

Ahmadpur, Thang</w, P. 

Ahmadpur Lamba, Bahawalpur s, P. 

Ahmadpur, Bahawalpur x. P. 

Ahmadzai, Bannu dis, P. 

Ahmedabad, cap, and dis. Bo. P. 

Ahmednagar, cap, and dis. Bo. P. 

Ahmednagar, Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Ahobalam, sh, Kamul dis, M.P. 

Ahor, Jodhpore s, R.A. 

Ahraula, Azamgarh dis, N.W.P. 

Ahraura, Mirzapur^ix, N.W.P. 

Ahtaran, r. Anmerst dis, 6.6. 

Ahu, r. Tonk s, R.A. 

Ahuri, /ar, Hazaribafh dis^ Chota Nagpore, 6. 

Ai, r. Goalpara dis^ A, 



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( ii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



Aigali, Belgaum dis, Bo. P. 

Aiholi, Kaladgi dis^ Bo. P, 

Aikota, Cochin j. M.P. 

Aimal Chabutra, Peshawar dis^ P. 

Ai Nadi, r. Goalpara dis, A. 

Ainapur, Belgaum dis^ Bo. P. 

Alrani, Dharwar diSf Bo. P. 

Airi,/. r. Mandla </«>, C.P. 

Airwa, Etawah dis, N.W.P. 

Ait, Jalaun </w, N.W.P. 

Aiyar, r. Salem ^w, M.P. 

Ajaibgang, Sarun dis^ B. 

Ajaigarh, ft, and ;. Bundelkhand, C.I. A. 

Ajamanagar, /ar, Belgaum ^i>, Bo. P. 

Ajanta, h, Berar, H.A.D. 

Ajanta, /^w, H. 

AJanur, South Canara dis^ M.P. 

A^eraka, Ulwur j. R.A. 

Ajgain, Unao </w, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Ajgaon, Sawantwari s. Bo. P. 

Aji, a. Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Ajitmal, Etawah dis, N. W. P. 

Ajitpura, Bickaneer s, R. A. 

Ajjampur, Kadur dis, Mysore, M, P. 

Ajmere, cap^ and dis, R. A. 

Ajmirganj, Sylhet dis, A. 

Aimirgarh, h, Bilaspur dis^ C.P. 

Ajnad, Khandesh dts^ Bo. P. 

Ajnala, Amritsar dis^ P. 

Ajnar, Hamirpur dis^ N. W. P. 

Ajnar, r. C. I. A. 

Ajodhya, Bankoora dis^ B. 

Ajodhya, Burdwan dis^ B. 

Ajodhya, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Ajra,/. Kolhapur X. Bo. P. 

Ajrauda, Thakurate, C. I. A, 

Akalgarh, Gujranwala dis, P. 

Akalkot, s. Bo. P. 

Akauna, Baghelkhand, Rewah s. C. I. A. 

Akbarabad, /ar, Bijnor dis^ N. W. P. 

Akbarbandar, Rungpore dis, B. 

Akbamagar, /ar, §)nthal Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Akbarpur, Dewas s. C. I. A. 

Akbarpur, Cawnp)ore ^i>, N. W. P. 

Akbarpur Aunchla, Mainpuri </i>, N. W. P. 

Akbarpur, s.d, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Akbarpur, /ar, Mozufferpore dis^ Behar, B. 

Akbarpur, Umballa dis^ P. 

Akbarpur, Gya dis^ B. 

Akbarpur Rani, /ar, Monghyr dis, B. 

Akeri, Sawantwari s. Bo. P. 

Akhegarh, dis^ Bhurtpore s. R. A. 

Akhoyapada, Balasore dis, Orissa, 6. 

Akhrani, par^ Khandesh diSf Bo. P. 

Akhriganj, Moorshedabad dis^ B. 

Akidu, Godavari dis^ M. P. 

Aklaun, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Akiuj, Sholapur dis^ Bo. P. 

Akola, cap^ and dis, H. A. D. 

Akola, /a/, Ahmednagar dis, Bo. P. 

Akoli, Akola dis, H. A. D. 

Akora, Peshawar dis^ P. 

Akot, Akola dis, H. A. D. 

Akout-toung, h, Henzada dis^ B. B. 

Akra, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Akrabad, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 



A. 

Akyab, cap, and dis, B. B. 

Ala, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Alabakshpur, Patna dis^ Behar, B. 

Ala^, m, Madura dis, M. P. 

Alaipur, Jessore dis, B. 

Alaiyar, r. Coimbatore dis^ M. P. 

Alaknanda, r, N. \V. P. 

Alaknur, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Alambakam, South Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Alambarai, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Alamdanga, Nuddea dis, B. 

Alamganj, Patna </t>, B. 

Alamgiri, -4. and tem, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Alamgimagar, ft. Chittagong dis, B. 

Alamnagar, Bhagalpur dis, B. 

Alamnagar, Lucknow disy Oudh, N. W. P. 

Alamnagar, par, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Alamparwa, Soitth Arcot dis, M. P. 

Alampur, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Alampur, par, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Alamur, Godavari </w, M. P. 

Alandi, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Alamawas, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Alanka, h, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Alanpur, p,p, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Alapsingha, par, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Alapur, par, Durbhunga dis, B. 

Alatur, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Alaut, par, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Alawalpur, Jullunder dis, P. 

Alawarkhawa, Dinagepore dis, B. 

Albaka, tal, Upper Godavari dis, C.P. 

Aldemau, par, Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Alech, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Al^aon, Akola dis, H. A. D. 

Aleppi, Travankor s, M. P. 

Alewahi,, Chanda //ix, C.P. 

Algi, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Alguada, reef and //. house, B. B. 

AH, t,s. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Alibag, tal, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Aliganj, s,d, Etah dis, N. W. P. 

Aliganj Sewan, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Aligarh, cap, and dis, N. W. P. 

Aligarh, Farrukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Aligarh, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Al^rh, Tonk s. R. A. 

Alihat, Rungpore dis, B. 

Alikhel, Kuram val, P. 

Alimasjid^. Afghanistan. 

Alina, o,d, Kaira dis. Bo. P. 

Alinagar, cant, Sylhet </«, A. 

Alipore, c,s, cant, and ^.^. 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Alipore, ^r.j. Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Alipur, Delhi </i.r, P. 

Alipur, Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Alipur, h, Bhurtpore s. R. A. 

Alipur, Muzaffargarh dis, P. 

Alipur, Wardha dis, C. P. 

Alipur Duar, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Alipur Patti, par, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Alipura,/ Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Aliwal, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Aliwala, Mooltan dis, P. 

Alkuti, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Allah^j, Farrukhabad dis, N. W. P. 



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( iii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



Allahabad, cap. cant, div. dis, and s,g, N. W. P. 

Allahabad, Shahpur^tV, P. 

Allahganj, Farrukhabad dis^ N. W. P. 

Allanmyo, Thayetmyo dis, B. B. 

AUapilli, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Allatur, Malabar dis^ M, P. 

AUaur, Ludhiana disy P. 

Alliabad, Bara Banki dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

AUupur, Kamal dis, P. 

Allur, taL Bellary dis, M. P. 

Alluni, Nellore disy M. P. 

Almel, Kaladgi dis^ Bo. P. 

Almod, a. Chhindwara dis, C. P. 

Almora, cant, and san^ Kumaon </»>, N. W. P. 

Alnawar, Dharwar </i>, Bo. P. 

Alon, r. Seoni dis, C.P. 

Alphadanga, Jessore disy B. 

Alta, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Alti, pary Cuttack disy Orissa, B. 

Alur, Dharwar disy Bo. P. 

Alvar Kurichi, Tinnevelly disy M. P. 

Aiwa, e, Sankhera Mewas, Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

Alwakhuwa, c,s, Pumeah diSy B. 

Alwartirunagaram, Tinnevelly diSy M. P. 

Alwaye, r. Cochin s, M. P. 

Alwaye, Travankor s, M. P. 

Am, r. Raipur dis, C. P. 

Amadalli, Kanara disy Bo. P. 

Amadpur, Burdwan diSy B. 

Amakhel, Dera Ismail Khan disy P. 

Amala, Dang s, Khandesh diSy Bo. P. 

Amalapuram, Godavari diSy M. P. 

Amalner, ialy Khandesh diSy Bo. P. 

Amalsad, Surat diSy Bo. P. 

Amalyara, Mahikanta, Bo. P. 

Amanat, r. Lohardugga dis, Chota Nagp>ore, B. 

Amaniganj, Fyzabad diSy Oudh, N. W. P. 

Amaniganjhat, Maldah dis, B. 

Amanpur, Etah diSy N. W. P. 

Amarapur, Bellary diSy M. P. 

Amaravati, r. Coimbatore diSy M. P. 

Amaravati, r, Kistna diSy M. P. 

Amaigarh, Kerowlee s, R. A. 

Amarkantak, h, Bilaspur disy C. P. 

Amarpatan, Rewah s, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Amarpur, c, s. Baghalpur dis, B. 

Amar Sidhu, Lahore dis, P. 

Amarthu, /ar, Monghyr^w, B. 

Amarwara, Chhindwara dis, C. P. 

Amauli, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Amayan, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Amb, par, Hazara diSy P. 

Amb, r. Nagpur</f>, C.P. 

Amba, par, Khandesh diSy Bo. P. 

Amba, r. Colaba dis, Bo. P. 

Amba, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Amba, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Ambabhona, Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Ambagarh, z, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Ambaghat, Ratnagiri disy Bo. P. 

Ambahta, Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Ambajhari, r. Bal^usore diSy Orissa. 

Ambajidurga, A. Kolar dis, Mysore, M. P. 

Ambajipeta, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Ambar, pary Sonthal-Perguonahs dis, B. 

Ambarapet, s, Godavari dis, M. P. 



A. 

Ambari, Dehra Dun disy N. W. P. 

Ambamath, Tanna diSy Bo. P. 

Ambasamudram, /a/, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Ambatmuri, p. South Canara dis, M. P. 

Amb^aon, Kaveli fa/, Poona diSy Bo. P. 

Ambegaon, Khed /«/, Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Ambgaon, «. Chanda diSy C. P. 

Ambica, Surat disy Bo. P. 

Ambikanagar,/ar, Manbhoom dis, Chota Nagpur, B, 

Ambli, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Ambohatta, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Amboli, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Amboli, Sawantwari s. Bo. P. 

Ambulupali, Travankor s, M. P. 

Ambur, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Amburpet, «. Salem dis, M. P. 

Amdahar, Rungpore dis, B. 

Amer, A. Teypore s. R. A. 

Amet, s.d, Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Am6thi, Farrukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Amethi, Lucknow diSy Oudh, N. W. P. 

Amethi, s.d. Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Amgaon, z. Bhandara </<>, C.P. 

Amguri, Sibsagar dis, A. 

Amherst dis, B. B. 

Ami, Fair, Sarun disy B, 

Aminabad, Lucknow dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Amindiv, i. South Canara dis, M, P. 

Amingad, Kaladgi diSy Bo. P. 

Aminpur, Dacca diSy B. 

Amirabad, pary Pubna diSy B. 

Amirabad, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Amirganj, Rungpore diSy B. 

Amirgarh, Tonk s. R. A. 

Amir Pir, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Amirti, Baghelkhand, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Amjar, r. Gwalior s» C. I. A. 

Amjhera, diSy Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Amjio, A, Banswara s. R. A. 

Amjonga, A. 

Amia, Betul diSy C. P. 

Amlasadarpur, Nuddea diSy 6. 

Ammangi, Belgaum diSy Bo. P. 

Ammanhalli, Kanara diSy Bo. P. 

Ammapetai, Salem diSy M. P. 

Ammapetai, Tanjore diSy M. P. 

Ammatti Nad, Acdy Coorg, M. P. 

Ammayanayakanur, z. Madura dis, M. P. 

Amnaur, Sarun diSy Behar, B. 

Amner, Akola diSy H. A. D. 

Amod, fa/y Broach diSy Bo. P. 

Amola, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Amolmotia, /ar, Sonthal-Pergunnahs </i>, B. 

Amorha, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Ampta, Hooghly dis, B. 

Amran, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Amrahan, r. Rewah s, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Amraoti, cap. and dis, H. A. D. 

Amrapur, Buldana dis, H. A. D, 

Amrapur, e. Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

Amravati, ru, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Amreli, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Amritabazar, Jessore dis, 6. 

Amritsar, cap, div, dis, and canf P. 

Amrodha, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Amioha, par, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 



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( iv ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



A. 

Amroli, Surat dis^ Bo. P. 

Amnil, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Amsin, par, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Amsot, Bijnor dis, N. W. P. 

Amua, r. Backergunge diSf B. 

Amura Bhauriari, Chumpanin dis, Behar, B. 

An, r. Kyoukphyoo </«, B. B. 

Anabartak, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Anadpur, Jodhpore s. R. A. 

Anadra, Sirohee s. R. A. 

Anagundi, Bellaiy dis, M. P. 

Anakapalle, «. Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Anakwari, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Anamalai, m, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Anamasamudrapett, sh, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Anand, Kaira dis. Bo. P. 

Anandpur, Hoshiarpur dis, P. 

Anandpur, Midnapore dis, B. 

Anandpur, par, Singhboom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Anantapur, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Anantapur, Shlmoga dis, Mysore, M. P. 

Anantapur, fal, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Anaatasagram. sh, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Anas, r. Panch Mahals dis. Bo. P. 

Ana Sagar, /. Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Anaskura, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Anaskura, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Ancha, par, Gya dis, B. 

Anchatgeri, Dharwar dis, Bo. P. 

Anchittai Diirgam, fi. Salem dis, M. P. 

Anchlakhali, Khal, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Andal, Burdwan dis, B. 

Andaman, i. Bay of Bengal, B. B. 

Andar, /. South Canara dis, M. P. 

Andar, par, Sarun dis, B. 

Andarsul, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Andaw, tern, Sandoway dis, B. B, 

Anderi, r. Tonk s, R. A. 

Andhalgaon, Bhandara dis, C.P. 

Andhan, par, Pooree dis, Orissai B, 

Andhari, r. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Andharia, Pahlanpur s. Bo. P. 

Andharibar, p.p, C. I. A. 

Andharmanik, r,, Backergunge dis, B. 

Andher, to, Bhopal j. C. I. A, 

Andheri, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Andheri, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Andhra, z. Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Andipatti, z, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Andipatti, «. and m, Madura dis, M, P, 

Andiyar, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Andori, Wardha dis, C.P. 

Andramat, Durbhanga dis, Behar B. 

Andua, Rungpore dis, 6. B. 

Andul, Hooghly dis, B. 

Andura, Akola dis, H. A. D. 

Anekal, Bangalore dis, Mysore, M. P. 

Aner, r. Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Angadipuram, Malabar dis, M. P, 

Angar, Sholapur dis, Bo. P. 

Angaria, /»>, Midnapore </«, B. 

Ai^arbari, m,, Singbhoom dis, B, 

Angol, Kurundwad s. Bo. P. 

Angra, Dera Ismail Khan dis^ P. 

Angrezabad, Maldah dis, B. 

Angul, u, Cuttack dis^ Orissa, B. 



Angyec, Rangoon dis, B. B. 

Annoni, Hoshangabad, dis, C.P. 

Animurmitta, «. Salem dis, M. P. 

Anismall, Nuddea dis, B. 

Anjadwip, i, Goa ter. Bo. P. 

An^angaon Bari, Amraoti dis, H. A. D. 

An^an^on Suiji, Ellichpur dis, H. A. D. 

Anjani, r. Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Anjaniri, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Anianwel, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

An^ar, Cutch j. Bo. P. 

Anjar, Burwani s. C. I. A. 

Anjaria, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Anjengo, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Anjhi, Wardha dis, C. P. 

Anji, Wardha dis, C.P. 

Anjidiv, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Anjigeri Nad, hcb, Coorg, M. P. 

Ankai, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Ankai Tankai, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Ankalg], Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Ankleswar, Broach dis, Bo. P. 

Ankola, Kanara dis, Bo. P. 

Ankura, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Ankusa, Upper Godavari dis, C.P. 

Ankusagiri, %. Salem dis, M. P. 

Annadanapatti, z. Salem dis, M. P. 

Annaikarai Chattram, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Anni Ati, Sibsagar dis, A. 

Annigeri, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Anpuma, sh, Tonk s, R. A. 

Anshi, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Ansing, Basim dis, H. A. D. 

Antarodh, par, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Antora, Colaba dis. Bo. P. 

Antpur, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Antri,^. Gwalior J. C. I. A. 

Ajiin, par, Indorej. C I, A. 

Anulia, Nuddea dis, B. 

Anupgarh, Bickaneer s, R. A. 

Anupshahr, s,d. Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Anur, Bankoora dis, B. 

Anwal, Rohtak dis, P. 

Anwara, Chittagong dis, B. 

Anwarpur, Radihanpur s. Bo. P. 

Aonla, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Aonla, par, BareiUy dis, N. W. P. 

Aphawar, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Apila, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Arail, par, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Arakan, cap, dis, and div, B. B. 

Arakan (Northern), dis, B. B. 

Aramda, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Aramlia, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Aran, r. H. A. D. 

Arang, Raipur dis, C. P. 

Aran^hata, Nuddea dis, B. 

Aram, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Arankola, Pubna dis, B. 

Arantangi, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Araraj, Chnmparun dis, Behar, B. 

Arari Gadi, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Arasur, Mahikanta, Bo. P* 

Araun, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Arava Kurichi, Coimbatore </w, M. P. 

Aravalli, MtmnUuHS, R. A. 



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( V ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



A. 

Aranji, Balasore, diSf Orissa, B. 

Arawad, Khandesh dis^ Bo. P. 

Arazi, Karachi diSf Sind, Bo. P« 

Arbail, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Arbela, h. Garo Hills </m, A. 

Arcot, (North) dis, M. P. 

Arcot, (South) dis, M. P. 

Arcot, North Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Arcot Paliya, North Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Ardabak, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Ardi, Jair, Balasore dis^ Orissa, B. 

Argaon, Khandesh dis^ Bo. P. 

Argara, Beely Maldah dis, B. 

Argaam, Akola dis^ H. A. D, 

Argin, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Ariadaha, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Aring, /ar, Muttra</ij, N. W. P. 

Ariakod, Malabar dis^ M. P. 

Ariakupam, r. South Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Arialkhan, r. Backergunge and Furreedpore dis^ B, 

Ariankavu, /. and tem^ Travankor s, M. P. 

Aripad, sh, Travankor x. M. P. 

Ariraj, /./. Chumparun </w, B. 

Arisillar, r. Tanjore dis^ M. P. 

Arjar, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Aijuni, «. Bhandara </i>, C. P. 

Arkalgud, Hassan dis^ Mysore, M. P. 

Arkavati, r. Mysore, M. P. 

Arkeri, Kaladgi </i>, Bo. P. 

Arkonam, North Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Aria, r, Ahmednagar dis^ Bo. P. 

Arli, Wun dis, H. A. D. 

Arlikatti, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Armala, par^ Balasore dii, Orissa, B. 

Armeri, Coorg, M. P. 

Armori, Chanda disy C. P. 

Ami, Chingleput dis^ M. P. 

Ami, «, North Arcot </iV, M. P. 

Ami, Wun dis, H. A. D. 

Arnia, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Amauli, Karaal dis^ P. 

Amiwala, Sirsa dis, P. 

Amiya, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Arnu, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Arol, r, Berar, H. A. D. 

Aror Kandhar, Shikarpur dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Aror Mando Dairo, Shikarpur dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Arpa, r, Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Arpalli, Chanda dis^ C.P. 

Arrah, cap^ and s,d, Shahabad t/iV, B, 

Arrareah, /. and j. d, Pumeah dis^ B, 

Arsadpur, Rungpore dis^ B. 

Arso, par^ Balasore dis, Orissa, B, 

Arthuna, Banswara s, R, A. 

Amnawati, r. Khandesh dis^ Bo. P, 

Ampakotai, Madura dis, M. P. 

Arvi, /. and s.d. Wardha dis, C. P. 

Arwal, /. and par^ Gya dis^ B. 

Arwanda, Siwantwari s. Bo. P. 

Aryalur, Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 

Asadpur, /ar, Budaun dis, N. W. P. 

Asafpur, Bijnor dis, N. W. P. 

Asa], Lahore dis, P. 

Asalu, A. 

Asan, r. N. W. P. 

Asan, r. Gwalior j, C. I. A. 



A. 

Asandh, Kamal disy P. 

Asansol, Burdwan dis, B. 

Asaralli, Upper Godavari dis, C.P. 

Asarva, Ahmedabad diSy Bo. P. 

Asasuni, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Asegaon, Bassim dis, H. A. D. 

Ashembu, m, Travankor s, M. P. 

Asheri, Tanna dis^ Bo. P. 

Ashjo, par^ Pumeah dis^ B. 

Ashta, par, Bhopal s. C. I. A. 

Ashta, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Ashtagram, /a/, Mysore, M. P. 

Ashti, Amraoti </i>, H. A. D. 

Ashti, Wardha dis, C. P. 

Ashvi, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Asirgarh,/?. Nimar^tf, C. P. 

Asiwan, /ar, Unao ^iV, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Aska, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Asko, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Aslana. Damoh dis, C.P. 

Asmauli, Moradabad dis^ N. W. P. 

Asni, Dera Ghari Khan disy P. 

Asoda, r. Wardha dis, C. P. 

Asoha Parsandan, par, Unao </i>, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Asop, Jodhpore x. R. A. 

Asothar, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Aspiri, fiellary dis^ M. P. 

Aspur, Dungarpur s, R. A, 

Assia, m, and r. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Astaran, par, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Asthayan, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Asureshwar, par, Cuttack dis^ Orissa, B. 

Asurgarh, Pumeah dis, B. 

Aswan, r. Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

Ata, s.d, Jalaun dis, N. W. P. 

Ataikola, Pubna^/ij, B. *• 

Atalband, /. Bhurtpore x. R. A • 

Atari, Amritsar dis, P. 

Atari, Jullundur dis, P 

Atari, Montgomery dis^ P. 

Atari, par, Gya </i>, B. 

Atarmura, m. r. Hill Tipperah, B, 

Atarsumba, Baroda s. Gujarat, Bo. P* 

Ata Serai, Patna dis, B. 

Atawa, Gujranwala dis, P. 

Atchaveram, Tanjore dis, M. P, 

Atcheepore, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Ateha, par, Partab^h dis^ Oudh, N. W. P. 

Ater, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Atgaon, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Atgram, Sylhet dis, A. 

Athais, par, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Atharabanki, /. and r. 24-Pergunnah8 dis, B. 

Atharabari, Mjrmensingh dis, B. 

Atharanhazari, J hang dis, P. 

Atharban, par, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Atharga, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Athgaon, Sylhet dis, A. 

Athgaon Benares dis, N. W. P. 

Athgarh, i,s, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Athkhanta, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Athmallik, t.s. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Athni, tal, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Athur, Madura dis, M. P. 

Athwa, r. Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Athwa, cant, Surat dis. Bo. P. 



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( vi ) 

Alphabetical Index, 



A. 



Ada, /. and 5,d, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Atkot, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Atma, /./. Patna dis^ B. 

Atmakur, /a/, Nellore dis^ M. P. 

Atmakur, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Atna, r. Thar Parkar dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Atnair, Betul dis, C. P. 

Atoari, Dinagepore dis, 6. 

Atrai, r. Dinagepore dis^ B. 

Atrauli, t. and s,d, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Atraulia, Aiamgarh dis^ N. W. P. 

Atri, Gya dis, B. 

Atri, Garh, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Attapadi, p, Malabar dis^ M. P. 

Attaramalle, m, Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Attikuppa, Hassan dis^ Mysore, M. P. 

Attill, Godavari dis^ M. P. 

Attingul, Travankor s, M. P. 

Attipatu, Chingleput dis^ M. P. 

Attock, j?. and ccmt^ Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Atur, /a/, Salem dis, M. P. 

Atur, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Atwa Piparia, par, Kheri dis, Oudh, N W. P. 

Au Ana, A. 

Auchar, Dang s, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Au Guri, A. 

Au^;asi, J>ar, Banda dis, N, W. P. 

Aujla, Gujranwala dis, P. 

Aul, Cnttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Aulabati, Tonk x. R. A. 

Aulas, Poona dis, 60. P. 

Auldan, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Aunchha, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Aundh, s, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Aundhi, 2. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Aun^j, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Auni Ati, A. 

Auraiya, t, and s,d, Etawah dis, N. W. P. 

Auranga, r, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Aurangabad, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Aurangabad, Gujrat dis, P. 

Aurangabad, Nizam's Dominions, H. 



A. 



Aurangabad, Moorshedabad dis^ B. 

Aurangabad, par, Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Aurangabad, par, Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Aurangabad Nagar, par, Basti </{>, N. W. P. 

Aurangabad, /. and s,d, Gya </f>, B. 

Auras, Unao dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Auroli, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Ausana, r. Shahabad dis, B. 

Ausari, Poona ^tr. Bo. P. 

Ausgram, Burdwan dis, B. 

Aushmali, Nuddea dis^ B. 

Autoor, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Auwa, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Avadi, Chingleput dis, M. P. 

Avanashi, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Avani, Kolar dis, Mysore, M. P, 

Avani-betta, h. Kolar dis, Mysore, M P. 

Avati, Kolar dis, Mysore, M. P. 

Awadhan, Sirsa dis, P. 

Awagarh, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Awar, /ar, Jhalawarx. C. I. A. 

Awarsha, Kanara dis, Bo. P. 

Awasgarh, par, Barwani s, C. I. A. 

Ayah, Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Ayah Sah, par, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Ayakotta, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Ayakuda, Madura dis, M. P. 

Ayakudi, z, Madura dis, M. P. 

Ayela, r. Backergunge dis, B. 

Ayodhya, h, Manbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Ayyalur, Trichinopoly^M, M. P. 

Ayyampet, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Aj^ankere, tank, Kadur dis, Mysore, M. P. 

Azamgarh, cap, and dis, N. W. P 

Azamnagar, par, Etah dis, N. W. P. 

Azim, Bannu dis, P. 

Azimabad, /ar, Patna ^fj, B. 

Azimganj, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Azimganj, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Azmat|[arh, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Azmenganj, Sylhet dis. A, 



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( vii ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



B. 

Ba, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Baanta, Balasore dis^ Orissa, B. 

Bababudan, h. Kadur dis, Mysore, M. P. 

Babai, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Babai, Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

Babakuwar, Khandesh dis^ Bo. P. 

Babadraj, Khandesh dis^ Bo. P. 

Babdco, A. Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Babeni, s.d. Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Babhli, Ellichpur dis, Beiar, H. A. D. 

Babhnipair, par, Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Babina, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Babia or Dwarka, r. Moorshedabad dis^ B. 

Bableshwar, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Babnabari, Burdwan dis, B. 

Babra, Jodhpore, s, R. A. 

Babra, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Babra Sarkar, par^ Moruflferpore dis^ Behar, B. 

Babra Tappa, par, Durbhunga dis^ Behar, B. 

Babrala, Budaun dis, N. W. P. 

Babriawar, dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Babulgaon, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Babupet, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Babupur, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Babupur, Jessore dis^ B. 

Bachai, Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

Bachal Sand, Hyderabad dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Bachhaur, par, Durbhunga dis^ Behar, B. 

Bachhraon, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 

Bachhrawan, par, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Backergunge, ^, s,d, and dis^ B. 

Bad, Kanara dis, Bo. P. 

Badagara, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Badakarai, Malabar dis^ M. P. 

Badalgachhi, Bogra dis, B. 

Badami, tal, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Badan, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Badani, Upper Sind Frontier dis. Bo. P. 

Badanganj, Bankoora dis, B. 

Badarganj, Rungpore dis, B. 

Badari, r. Mysore, M. P. 

Badarpur, Cachar dis, A. 

Badarpur, Delhi dis, P. 

Badarpur, khcU, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Badarwas, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Badausa, s.d, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Badavolu, see Badvel. 

Baddoke, Gujranwala dis, P. 

Badebhusari, pat, Durbhunga </fV, Behar, B. 

Badebhusari, par, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Badhatigang, r. 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Badhber, Peshawar dis, P. 

Badiakhali, Rungpore dis, B, 

Badiana, Sialkot dis, P. 

Badin, tal, Hyderabad dis. Bo. P. 

Badkochran, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Badlapur, Taunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Badlapur, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Badli, Rohtak du, P. 

Badlipur, Sibsagar dis, A. 

Badnawar, dis, Dhar j. C. I. A. 

Badnera, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Badner Bholaji, Buldana </w, Berar, H. A. D. 

Badner Gangai, Ellichpur dis^ Berar, H. A. D. 

Badnur, c»s, Betul dis, C. P. 

Bade, h, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 



B. 

Bado Sarai, par, Barabanki dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Badowal, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Badri, r. Cachar dis, A. 

Badrihat, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Badrinath, p.p, Garhwal dis, N. W. P. 

Badrpur, Sylhet dis, A. 

Badshahpur, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Badu, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Badura, r. Backergunge dis, B. 

Badurdona, r, Noakholly dis, B. 

Baduri, Garo Hills dis, A. 

Baduria, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Badvel, tal, Cuddapah dis, M. P. 

Bag, ft. Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Baga, fair, Bogra dis, B. 

Bagaha, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Bagain, r. N, W. P. 

Bagalkot, tal, Kaladgi dis, Bo. P. 

Bagan, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Bagan, r, Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Baganchra, Nuddea dis, B. 

Bagar, r. N. W. P. 

Bagardi, r. C. I. A. 

Bagarian, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Bagasra, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Bagaud, par, Dewas x. C. I. A. 

Bagbati, Pubna dis, B. 

Bagchini, Gwalior j. C. I. A. 

Bagda, par, Manbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Bagdad, Turkish Arabia. 

Bagdaha, r. 24-Perguunahs dis, B. 

Bagdob, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Bagdogra, Rungpore dis, B. 

Bagenhalli, Kolar dis, Mysore, M. P. 

Bagesar, /./. Kumaon dis, N. W. P. 

Bn^ewflri, ial, BelL^ium dis. Bo. P. 

Bii-jL^t wari, iai, Kabdgi dis. Bo. P. 

Bii^h, 7. Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Ba^^ha, Rajshahye dis, B. 

B.i|.^haitangj, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Ba-hal, /. P. 

Bagham, Rawat Pindi dis, P. 

Baj^'hanai Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Bayhaparana, Ferorepore dis, P. 

Bagharpara, Jessore dis, B. 

Bnglmt, s, l\ 

B.igbkmpvifa, Lahore dis, P, 

Bagh Ba^afj Calcutta, B. 

B:ighchu, A. 

Bai^hdanga, Jessore dis, B. 

Biii;helkhand, /r. C. I. A. 

B[i]^heki, Feroxepore dis, P. 

Bag h era, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Baghera, Jhansi i/tr, N. W. P. 

Bagherij Tonk s* R. A. 

Baghi, r. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Bxigbit MozuHerpore dis, B. 

Biiijh j afar khan, Patna dfw, Behar, B. 

Bai^hjala, 24'Pcrguunahs dis, B. 

Bajjhmari, A» Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

fiii^hmundii h. and par, Manbhoom dis, Chota- 

Nagpore, B. 
Baghnadi, r. Bhandara dis, C. P. 
Baghnadi, r. Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 
Baghra, par, Muzaffamagar dis, N. W. P. 
Baghraji, Jubbulpore dis^ C. P, 



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( viii ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



B. 

Baghri, Jhang dis^ P. 

Bagirhat, /. and s.d. Jessore dis^ B. 

Bagkhali, r. Chittagong and Chittagong Hill 

Tracts dis, B. 
Baglan, /a/, Nassik dis^ Bo. P. 
Bagli, ft, Indore s, C. I. A. 
Bagmara, Rajshahye dis, B. 
Bagmati, r. Chumparun and Mozufferpore dis^ 

Behar, B. 
Bagnagar, Purneah, </iV, Behar, B. 
Bagnapara, Burdwan dis^ B. 
Bagni, r, C. I. A. 

Bagodar, Hazaribagh dis^ Chota Nagpore. B. 
Bago Tando, tai, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Bagpat, /. and s.d. Meerut dis^ N. W. P. 
Bagrah, Sambalpur dis, C. P. 
Bagri, Jodhpore s, R. A. 
Bagri, Tonk s, R. A. 
Bagribari, Goalpara dis^ A. 
Bagru, Jeypore s. R. A. 
Bagsuri, Ajmere disj R. A. 
Bagundi, fair^ 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 
Bag^'ara, par, Surat dis^ Bo. P. 
Bah, Agra dis, N. W. P. 
Bahabpur, Burdwan dis^ B. 
Bahadran, Bickaneec s, R. A. 
Bahadurganj, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 
Bahadurganj, Purneah dis, Behar, B. 
Bahadurgarh, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 
Bahadurgarh, Rohtak dis, P. 
Bahadur Khel, Peshawar disj P. 
Bahadurpur, //. Gwalior j. C. I. A. 
Bahadurpur, Nimar dis, C. P. 
Bahadurpur, par, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 
Bahadurpur, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 
Bahadurpur, Sylhet dis^ A. 
Bahai, r. Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Bahali, Rohtak dis, P. 

Baharagura, Singhbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B, 
Baharbanda, Rungpore dis, B. 
Bahas, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B, 
Bahat, Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 
Bahawa, Bhagalpur dis, B. 
Bahawalpur, cap, and s, P. 
Bahawara, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 
Bahdimi, Hyderabad dis, Bo. P* 
Bahera, Durbhunga dis^ Behar, B. 
Baheri, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 
Baherimutha, par, Midnapore dis, B. 
Bahgul, r. N. W. P. 
Bahi, /., Banswara s. R. A. 
Bahjoi, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 
Bahlak, Montgomery dis, P. 
Bahmangaon, e. Balaghat dis, C. P^ 
Bahmani, Mandla dis, C. P. 
Bahora, Gurgaon dis, P. 
Bahraich, cap, and dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Bahram, Ellichpur </».», Berar, H. A. D. 
Bahramghat, Barabanki dis, Oudh, N. W. ?. 
Bahrampur, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P, 
Bahrampur, Gurdaspur dis, P, 
Bahror, Ulwur s. R. A. 
Bahsuma, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 
Bahu, r. Cuddapah dis, M. P. 
Bahurupa, par. Cut lack dis, Orissa, B, 
Baidaura, Jhansi dis,.li ' W. P. 



B. 

Baideswar, Orissa, B. 

Baidur, South Canara dis, M. P. 

Baidyabati, Hooghly dis, B. 

Baidyanath, SonUial Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Baidyapur, Burdwan dis, B. 

Baihar, Balaghat dis, C. P. 

Baijnath, Kangra dis, P. 

Baijnath, Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Baikal, ft. South Canara dis, M. P. 

Baikathpur, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Baikunthpur, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Baikuntpur, par, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Baikuntpur, par, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Bailhongal, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Baindarra, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Bairagarh, Ellichpur dij, Berar, H. A. D. 

Bairagi Kamrup dis, A. 

Bairandurga, A. Bangalore dis, Mysore, M. P. 

Bairat, dis, Jeyp^ore s. R. A. 

Baireddipalle, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Bairia, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Bairigibazar, Sylhet dis, A. 

Bairiperi, Rungpore dis, B. 

Bairishakhpala, Rungpore dis, B. 

Bairma, r. Damoh dis, C. P. 

Baishakhi, JkAa/, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Baita, r. Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Baitaghata, Jessore dis, B. 

Baitami, r. Singhbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore and 

Orissa, B. 
Baitu, Jodhpore s. R. A. 
FAJmi^ /a/, Jhallawad dis, Kattywar Bo. P. 
I'aj Iki], 24-Pergunnuhs dis, B. 
Brijina, Kissar JfV, B. 

liajiipur, dee/, Rajshahye and Rungpore dis, B. 
Bajifpur^ Mymensingh dis, B, 
Bajitjiurt Rungpore dis, B. 
Buijrajogini, Dacca ^f>, B. 
BLijrsAioi, par, Vooree dis, Orissa, B. 
Bti\t:\,ng'^iuh, ft Gwalior s. C. I. A. 
Bajurbhjor, iia/, Rajshahye ^i>, B. 
Bajivni^ Sialkot dis, P. 

Bajuras Muhabbatpur, /ar, Rajshahye ^t>, B. 
Bakaner, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 
Bakar, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Bakewar, Etawah dis, N. W. P. 
Bakhasar, Jodhpore s. R. A. 
Bakhra, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 
Bakhshi Bazar, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Bakhtgarh, Dhar s. C. I. A, 
Bakhtiarpur, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 
Bakhtiarpur, Patna dis, Behar, B. 
Bakhyo Chandio, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Bakirabad, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Bakirganj, Patna dis, Behar, B. 
Baklahi, r. Partabgarh dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Bakloh, Gurdaspur, ^n, P. 
Bakot, //. Hazara dis, P. 
Bakra, Mozufferpore dis, Behar. B, 
Bakra, r. Purneah dis, Behar, B. 
Bakrai, r. Damoh dii, C. P. 
Bakrani, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Bakreshwar fair and r. Beerbhoom dis, B. 
Bakrol, Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 
Baksa, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 
Baksapahar, A. Cooch Behar s, B. 



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( ix ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



B. 



Baksha, h, Cooch Behar s. B. 

Baksha, Jaunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Bakshikhal, r, Hooghly dis, B. 

Baksiganj, Mymensingh dis. B. 

Bakta, A. 

Bakudi r. Cuttack dis^ Orissa, B. 

Bal, par, Sarun dis^ Behar, B. 

Bala, pat, Jalpaifuri dis, B. 

Balabahat, /ar, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

Balabhet, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Balachor, Hoshiarpur ^/ii, P. 

Balagachh, /or, Durbhun^ dis, Behar, B. 

Balaganj, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 

Balaganj, Sylhet dis, A. 

Balagara, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Balaghat, dis, C. P. 

Balahera, J^rpore s, R. A. 

Balahl, k, Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Balakot, ft, Hazara dis, P. 

Balakot, ft, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Balaman, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Balambha, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Balamgarh, Bhurtpore s, R. A. 

Balan, r. Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Balanga, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Balapur, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Balaram, /./. Palanpur s. Bo. P. 

Balarampur, Manbhoom dis, Cbota Nagpore, B. 

Balarampur, fair, Jessore dis, B. 

Balarampur, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Balarampur, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Balarampur, par, Midnapore dis, B. 

Balarampur, par, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Balaran, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Balasan, r. Daijeeling dis, 6. 

Balasinor, s. Rewakanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Balasore, A. Malabar dis, M. P. 

Balasore, cap, dis, and s,d, Orissa, B. 

Balbhadrapur, Cuttack dis^ Orissa. B. 

Balcha, /. P. 

Balcbari, i, Sundarbans, B. 

Balchetty Chuttrum, Chii^leput dis, M. P. 

Baldeo, p,p, Muttra dis, N. W. P. 

Baldiabui, b,f, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Baleghat, Ahmednagar dis, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Baleni, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Baleshwar, r, Jessore and Backeigunge dis, B. 

Baleshwar, o,d, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Balp^ona, Burdwan dis, B. 

Bah, Burdwan dis, B. 

Bali, Hooghly dis, B. 

Bali, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Balia, par, and /. Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Balia, par, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Balia, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Baliaehata, /. and ca, 24-Peigunnahs dis, B. 

Baliakandi, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Baliapal, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Baliapatam, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Baliari, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Baliator, Bankoora </tr, B. 

Balichandrapur, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Balidewanganj, Burdwan dis, B. 

Baligarh, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Balighattam, sh^ Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Baligoli, North Kanara dis, Bo. P. 



B. 

Balihar, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Balihri, jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Balikuda, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Balipara, / r. Darrang dis, A. 

Balipatna, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Balirungam, h, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Balishahi, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Balisira, h, Sylhet dis,, A. 

Balkh, /. and/r. Afghanistan. 

Balkhanda, par, Balasore dis, Orisia, B. 

Ballabgarh s.d, Delhi dis, P, 

Ballalpur, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Ballia/./. cap, and dis, N. W. P. 

Ballipalli, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Bally, Hooghly dis, B. 

Ballygnnge, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Balodh, Kaipur dis, C. P. 

Balotra, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Balrampur, Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Balsamand, Hissar dis, P. 

Balsan, s, P. 

Balsar, /. taidport, Surat dis, Bo. P. 

Balsi, Burdwan dis, B. 

Balsuri, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Balthar, par, Chumparun dis, Behar, B, 

Balu, r, Dacca dis, B, 

Balua, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Balua Gondauli, tappa, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Balubhara, Bom. dis, B. 

Balubisi, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Balumath, Lohardugga dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Balunda, Jodhpore s. R. A. 

Balur, Kadur ais, Mysore s, M. P. 

Balut, m. P. 

Baluwa, Benares dis, N. W. P. 

Bamanbor, s, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Bamandanga, Rungpore </fV, B. 

BamanghaU, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Bamangola, Maldah dis, B. 

Bamankunda, Run^pore dis, B. 

Bamanwara, p,p, Sirohee s, R. A. 

Bamauri, Pillibhit dis, N. W. P. 

Bamhani, Lohardugga dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Bamini, m, Vizagapatam dis, M, P. 

Bamla, Hissar dis, P. 

Bammanhalli, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Bammigatti, Dharwar dis, Bo. P. 

Bamna or Sapleja, r. Backergunge dis, B. 

Bamnai, r. Goalpara dis, A. 

Bamni, r. Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Bamniawas, dis, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Bamninadi, r, NoakhoUy dis, B. 

Bamnijra, Noakholly dis, B. 

Bamniyan, Jaunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Bamon, Tonk s, C. I. A. 

Bamori, par, Bhopal s, C. I. A. 

Bamra,/.^. Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Bamsaru, /. Garhwal dis, N. W. P. 

Bamuni Grohai, A. A. 

Banaga, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Banat, Muzafl^unagar dis, N. W. P. 

Banavar, tal, Kadur dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Banavara, Kadur dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Banavaram, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Banas r. Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Banas r. Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 



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( X ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



Banas, r. Palanpur s, Gujarat, Bo. P.' 

Banasa, Garhwal dis^ N. W. P. 

Banavar, par, Kadur, dis^ Mysore s, M. P. 

Banawaram, Mysore x. M. P. 

Banbania, fair, Nuddea dis, B. 

Banchas, par, Balasore dis^ Orissa, B. 

Banchash, /ar, Manbhoom dis^ Cbota Na^^re, B. 

Banchhapara, Jalpaiguri dis^ B. 

Banda, cap, and dis, N. W. P. 

Banda, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Banda, Sawantwari s. Bo. P. 

Banda, Lohardugga, dis^ Chota Nagpore, B. 

Banda, /. and s, d, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Bandai Khara, /af , Rajshahye dis, B. 

Bandaian, p, Kan^ra dis, P. 

Bandakpur, Damon dis, C. P. 

Bandanwara, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Bandarban, Chitta^ong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Bandar AImis, Persian Gulf 

Bandar Deoa, h, A. 

Bandel, Hoo^Iv dis, B. 

Bandgaon, Singhbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Bandh Bhujwa, r. Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bandhogarh, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Bandi, r. Jeypore s, R. A. 

Bandikhara, Rj^shahye dis, B. 

Bandikur, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Bandipallam h. South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Bandipur, Hooehly dis, B. 

Bandd, Seoni dis, C. P. 

Bandora, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Bandowala, Dera Ismail Khan dis^ P. 

Bandri, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Banera, Oodeypore s. R. A. 

Banera, /. Indore s, C. I. A. 

Baneshwar,/./. Dungarpur x. R. A. 

Banga, Jullundur dis, P. 

Bangacbhatra, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Bangahal, h. Kangra dis^ P. 

Bangali, r, Bogra^tV, B. 

Bangalji» Nuddea dis, B. 

Bangaljola, plains, Rajshahye disy B. 

Bangalore am$, tap, and dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Banganapalli, s, Kamul dis, M. P. 

Banganga, r. N. W. P. 

Banganga, r, Rajshahye dis, B. . 

Bangangs^ r. Jeypore s, R. A. 

Bangaon, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Bangaon, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Bangaon, Lakbimpur dis, A. 

Bangaonj s,d, Nuddea dis, B. 

Bangaon, Damoh eUs, C. P. 

Bangaon Jaygir, Rajshahve dis, B. 

Bangaon Khalisa, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Bangar, par, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bangaria, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Bangarmau, Unao dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bangaru, s. North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Bangasamudra, bay, Chittagong dis, B. 

Bangbari, Darrang dis, A. 

Banchatra, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Bangeshwardi, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Bangopasagar, bay, Noakholly dis^ B. 

Bangra, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

BangshibiEuri, Dinagepore dis, B. 

Banhi, Gujrat dis, P. 



Banhueli, 24-Pergnnnahs dis^ B. 

Baniachang, Sylhet dis, A. 

Baniapur, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Banit^dia, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Banihal, /. P. 

Baniar r. Balaghat dis, C. P. 

Banka, ca. Midnapore dis, B. 

Banka, r. Burdwan dis, B. 

Banka, /.^. Bhagulpur dis, Behar, B. 

Bankapur, tal, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Bankhandi, Manbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore B. 

Bahkheri, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Banki, t.s. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Bankikodla, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Bankipore, c,s. Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Bankipur, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Bankmundi, h, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Bankoora, cap, and dis, B. 

Bankot, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Banksai, Sxngbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

BanmaHpur, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Banmor, GwaUor s, C. I. A. 

Bannawasi, North Canara dis, M. P. 

Banni, Catch s. Bo. P. 

Bannirgatta, Bangalore dis, M. P. 

Bannu, cap, and dis, P. 

Banoripara, Backeigunge dis, B. 

Banpas, Burdwan dis, B. 

Banpur, /. and/ar, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

Banpur, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Banpur, e. Balaghat dis, C. P. 

Bansa, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Bansbaria, Hooghly dis, B. 

Bansda, s, Surat dis, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Bansdaha, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Bansdih, Gharipur dis, N. W. P. 

Bansdiha, Balasore dis, Orissa B. 

Bansgaon, s,d, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Banshi r. Dacca dis, B. 

Banshlai, r. Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Banshra, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Bansi, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Bansi,/ar, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

Bansi Paharpur, h. Bhurtpore 1. R. A. 

Banskandi, Caduur dis, A. 

Banskhali, Chittagong dis, B. 

Banskho, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Bansra, Sitapur dis, Oudh N. W. P. 

Bansror, ft, Kotah s. R. A. 

Bansur, s,d, Ulwur s, R. A. 

Banswara, cap, and x. R. A. 

Bantelian, Rawal Pindi dis, P. 

Banthra, Lucknow dis, 0«dh, N. W. P. 

Bantumilli, Kistna</M, M. P. 

Bantwa, tal, Sorath dis, Kattywar, Bo. B, 

Bantwal, South Canara dis, M. P. 

Banwaribad, Burdwan dis, B. 

Banwasi, Kanara^, Bo^ P. 

Baokhanda, M3rmensingh dis, B. 

Baoli Losar, Rawal Pindi dis, P. 

Baolia Sufed, Rawal Pindi dis, P. 

Baoni, s, Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Bapatla, tal, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Bar, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Bar, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Bar, LaUtpur dis, N. W. P. 



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( xi ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



Bar, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Bara, Rewah s. C. I. A. 

Bara/./. Gya <^w, Behar, B, 

Bara, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Bara, Peshwar ditf P. 

Baia, Unao dis, Ondh, N. W. P. 

Baiabaju, Mymeasingh dis^ B. 

Bara Banki, cap, and dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Barabar, A, Gya <^, Behar, B. 

Barabari, Rungpore dis, B. 

Bara Barkhera, s, C. I. A, 

Barabila, den/, Rungpore and Jessore dis^ B. 

Barabila, Rungpore dis, B. 

Barabt,y?. Cnttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Barachati, Gya du, Behar, B. 

Baradih, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Baradiha, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Baradiya, Saugor disy C. P. 

Barad Padauna, r. Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Bara Fenny, r. Noakholly dis, B. 

Baragai, A. Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Baragali, /. Hazara dis, P. 

Baragang, r. Rajshahye dis, B. 

Baragaon, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Baragaon, Benares dis, N. W. P. 

Baragaon, Sarun dis^ Behar, B. 

Baragaon, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Baragaon, Shajahanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Barah, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Barah, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Barah, s.d, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Barahabhum, Manbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Barahakatha, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Barahat, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Barahi, Rohtak dis, P. 

Barai, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Baraigaon, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Baraiganj, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Barail or Barel, h, Cachar dis, A. 

Barail, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

BaraitaU Mela, /air, Noakholly dis, B. 

Baraitha, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Barak, r. Sylhet dis, A. 

Barakanjiala, Sonthal Pergnnnahs dis, B. 

Barakar, Burdwan dis, B. 

Barakar, r. Manbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore B. 

Barakhsui, Aimere dis, R. A. 

Baraklia, r. B. 

Baral, Malda dis, B. 

Baral, r. Rajshahye and Patna dis, B. 

Bara Lacha, /. Kangra dis, P. 

Baraliya, r. Kamrup dis, A. 

Baraloe, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Baralokpur, Etawah dis, N. W. P. 

Baramati, Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Baramba, t,s, Cuttack dis, Orissa B. 

Barambai,/ r. Kamrup, A. 

Baramula, p, Kashmeer, P. 

Baran, Bannu dis, P. 

Baran, par, Bulandshahr dis, N. W, P. 

Baran, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa B. 

Baran, r. Karachi dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Baran, Tonk s, R. A, 

Barana, Jhang dis, P. 

Baranagar, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Baranala, ^^/, Jessoie dis, B. 



B. 

Baranai, r, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Baranet, r. Damoh dis, C. P. 

Barani, k, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Barantia, Jodhpore x. R. A. 

Baraoda, /tfr, taora s, C. I. A. 

Bara Pahara, Gwalior ^. C. I. A. 

Barapur, Sarun dis, Behar, B, 

Barara, Umballa dis, P. 

Baraii, Bhagalpur dis, Behar B. 

Baraset s, d, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Barasia, r, Furreedpore and Jessore dis B, 

Barath, dis, Sirohee s, R. A. 

Baraud, par, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Barauda, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

Baraudia, Gwalior s C. I. A. 

Barauli, Kamal dis, B, 

Barauli, par, Aligarh dis, N. W. B. 

Barauli, Sarun dts, Behar, B. 

Baraunda, s, Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Baraundha, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Baraunsa, par, Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. B. 

Baraut, Mcerut dis, N. W. B. 

Baraut, Allahabad dis, N. W. B. 

Barbari, Wardha dis, C. B. 

Barbaria, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Barbaspur, z. Raipur ttis, C. B. 

Barbekpur, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Barbigha, Monghyr dis, Behar, B, 

Barchi, Kanara dis, Bo. P. 

Barda, Azamgarh dis, N. W. B. 

Barda, A, and dis, Kattywar, Bo. B« 

Bardalani, Lakhimpur dis, A. 

Bardha, Damoh dis, C. B. 

Bardi, par, Rewah x. C. I. A. 

Bardiala, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Bardo, Barda dis, Kattywar, Bo. B. 

Bardoa, A. 

Bardol, par, Kaladgi dis. Bo. B. 

Bardoli, /a/, Surat dis. Bo. B. 

Bardolia, Sylhet dis, A. 

Barduar, / r. Kamrup dis, A« 

Barei, r. Belaspur dis, C. B. 

Bareilly, r<Mf/, cap, and dis, N. W. B, 

Barel, A. Naga Hills dis, A. 

Barela, Jubbulpore dis, C. B. 

Barela,/: r. Mandla^^w, C. B. 

Bareli, par, Bho];>al s, C. I. A. 

Barenda or Broang, /. P. . 

Bareng, r. Kashmir, P. 

Baresanr, Ix>hardugga dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Barga, /. P. 

Bargan, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Bargang, r. A. 

Bargaon, Saharanpur dis, N. W. B. 

Bargaon, s. Balaghat dis, C. B. 

Bargaon, Jodhpore s. R. A. 

Bargaon, /./, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Bargarh, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Bargarh s.d, Sambalpur dis, C. B. 

Baj^, Jubbulpore, dis, C. P. 

Bargoda, Mindnapore dis, B. 

Barb, c.s, and s,a, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Barha, Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

Barha, Peint s, Nassik dis, Bo. P. 

Barhad, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Barhaia, Monghyr dis, Behsa, B. 



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( xii ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



Barfaai, Gonkhpar dis, N. W. P. 

Barbalganj, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Barhan, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Barhanpor, fairt Shahabad dis, Befaar, B. 

Barhanpar, Akalkot s. Bo. P. 

Barhapara, Bijnor dis^ N. W. P. 

Barfaar, par^ Minapar <&, N. W. P. 

Barbara, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Barharia, Samn dis^ Behar, B. 

Barharwa, ChumparuD dis, Behar, B. 

Barhata, Mymensiiigfa dis^ B. 

Barhi, Gorakhpur £s, N. W. P. 

Barhwal, far, Benares dis, N. W. P. 

Barhijra, Mongh]nr dis, Behar, B. 

Barhpora, Euwah dis, N. W. P. 

Bari, Dholpur s, R. A. 

Bari, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Bari, par, Bhopal s, C. I. A. 

Bari, s.d, SiUpnr dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Baria, s. Rewakanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Barial, Je]rpore s, R. A. 

Bariardala, k, Noakholly dis, B. 

Bariarpur, Monghjrr dis, Behar, B. 

Bari Doab, n,d,c, P. 

Barinion, Jaunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Barikpur, Baiasore dU, Orissa, B. 

Barika Talab, /. Oode3rpore s, R. A. 

Barind, Partabgarh dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Barisha, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Bariya, or Baria /. Rewakanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Banara, Bankoora dis, 6. 

Barkal, m. Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Barkal Tan, h, Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Barkala, Cachar dis, A. 

Barkalur, North Canara dis, M. P. 

Barkanta, Tipperah dis, B. 

Barkesar, /./. C. I. A. 

Barkhera, BareiUy dis, N. W. P. 

Barkhere ki Nadi, r. Kerowlee x. R. A. 

Barkheri, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Barkhola, Cachar du, A. 

Barki, Lahore dis, P. 

Bar-ki-chauki, Delhi dis, P. 

Barkudl, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Barkul, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Barkur, South Canara dis, M. P. 

Baria, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Barlif Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Barlika, Sylhet dis, A. 

Barlu, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Barma, r. N. W. P. 

Barman, r, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Barmau, Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

Barmdeo, Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Banner, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Barmul, /. Orissa, B. 

Bama, par, Etah dis, N. W. P. 

Bama, r. N. W. P. 

Bar Nadi, r, Kamru^ dis, A. 

Bamagar, par, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Bamaeore, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Bamahal, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Bamihat, Kamrup dis, A. 

Barnala, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Baroda, /./. Jeypore i. R. A. 

Baroda, RobUk dis^ P. 



Baroda, cap and s, Guiarat, Bo. P. 

Baroya, Lohardogga dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Barpali, s. Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Barpani, r. Nowgong dis. A, 

Barpara, par, Manbboom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Barpathar, /L 

Barpatra, A. 

Barpeta, /. and s,d, Kamrup dis, A. 

Barra, s. C. I. A. 

Barrackpore, can/ and s,d, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Barripore, s,d. 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Barsaipur, Jeysulmere s, R. A. 

Barsana, Muttra dis, N. W. P. 

Barsar, Kangra dis, P. 

Barsi, Sholapur dis. Bo. P. 

Barsi Takli, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Barsoi, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Barsot, par, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Bartal, Sylhet dis, A. 

Baru, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Barua, /or, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Bama Chali, A. 

Baruagaon, Sibsagar dis, A. 

Banian, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Baruipur, s,d, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Barun, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Barunai, A, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Baruni, Rungpore dis, B. 

Barur, Ellichpur dis, H. A. D. 

Baruraj, Mo£uffer|>ore dis, Behar, B. 

Barurewa, r. Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

Baruva, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Baruwa, r. Baphelkhand, C. I. A. 

Barwa, s. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Barwa, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Barwa, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Barwaha, ft, and par, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Barwai, r. Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Barwai, Indore, C. I. A. 

Barwala, Hissar dis, P. 

Barwala, Ahmedabad dis, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Barwan, par, Hardoi dis^ Oudh, N. W. P. 

Barwani /. C. I. A. 

Barwar, par, Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Barwar, par, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Barwa Sagar, Thansi dis, N. W. P. 

Barwe, Lohaidugga dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Bas, Hissar dis, P. 

Basai, Ulwar s, R. A. 

Basana, Hissar dis, P. 

Basana, Rohtak dis, P. 

Basant, Delhi dis, P. 

Basantapury^V, Burdwan dis, B. 

Basantia, Jessore dis, B. 

Basantpur/ar, Manbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Basantpur, Samn dis, Behar, B. 

Basantpur, Sundarbans, B. 

Basarh, p.p, Mosufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Basavanbetta, A, Bangalore dis, Mysore /. M. P. 

Basavankote, ru, Kadur dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Baseri, Dholpur /. R. A. 

Basgi, A, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Basgora, Darrang dis. A, 

Basharatganj, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Basha, r. Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bashahr, or Bassahr j. P. 



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( xiii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



Bashatti, Rungpore dis^ B. 

Bashishtha, A. 

Bashta, Bijnor dis, N. W. P. 

Basi, Jeypore s, BL. A. 

Basi, r. P. 

Basia, Lohardugga dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Basim, cap, dis, and p,p, Berar, H. A. D. 

Basirpur, Montgomery dis, P. 

Basitang, A. Chittagong Hill Tracts, dis, B. 

Baskhari, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Basoda, Bhopal s. C. I. A. 

Basorhi, par, Bara Banki dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Basotra, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Basra, 24-Pergunnahs dis, 6. 

Basradurg, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Basrehar, Etawah dis, N. W. P. 

Basrur, South Canara dis, M. P. 

Bassaundhiya Tessore dis, B. 

Bassawal, A^hanistan. 

Bassein, Tanna dis, Bo. P. 

Bassein, tap, dis, and r. B. B. 

Basta, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Bastar, /.s. Upper Godavari dis, C. P. 

Basti, cap, and dis, N. W. P. 

Basti Hadl Sam, Bahawalpur, s, P. 

Basti Maluk, Mooltan dis, P. 

Basti Shekb, Jullundur dis, P. 

Bastwad, Belgaum <tis. Bo. P. 

Basudebpur, Midnapur dis, B. 

Basudevpur, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Basurhat, Noakholly dis, B. 

Baswa, dis, Jcyporc s, R. A. 

Baswa, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Bata, r. Kamrup dis, A. 

Batajari, Backergun^e dis, B. 

Batala, Gurdaspur dts, P. 

Batana, Kamaidis, P. 

Batane, r. Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Batasan, Rungpore dis, B. 

Batesar, /./. A^gra dis, N. W. P. 

Batiasarh, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Batiah, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Batika, Furr^pore dis, B. 

Batil, Dera IsmaU Khan dis, P. 

Batkagarh, s. Chhindwara dVf, C. P. 

Batlagundu, Madura dis, M. P. 

Batmara, A. 

Bator, Howrah dis, B. 

Batsara, tappa, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Battala, 24-Peigunnahs dis, B. 

Batteli, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Battiaghatta, Tessore cUs, B. 

Batttl, Howrah dis, B. 

Batura, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Baud, /./. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Banda, Peshawar dis, P. 

Banla, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Banleah, Raishahye dis, B. 

Bauli, r. Balasinor s, Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

Bauliari, Ahmedabad dis, Bo. P. 

Baunadi, r, Ratnagiri dis, Bo. P. 

Bauoda, Thansi dis, N. W. P. 

Baunli, dis, Jeypore x. R. A. 

Bauphal, Backergunge dis, B. 

Baur, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Baura,/. s» Kolhapui s. Bo. P. 



Baura, A, Ratnagiri dis, Bo. P. 

Baura, Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Baura, Rungpore dis, B. 

Baurgarh, A, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Baur^rh, /. r. Betul dis, C. P. 

Bavali, r. Mysore j. M. P. 

Bavanapadu, Ganiam dis, M. P. 

Bawal, r. and /. Patiala j. P. 

Bawali, 24-Parganas dis, B. 

Bawan, /ar, Hardoi </w, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bawan Bir, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Bawama, Kangra dis, P. 

Bawbeng, r, Tharrawaddy dis, B. B. 

Bawdee, Thonkwa dis, B. B. 

Bawigiri, Garo Hills dis, A. 

Bawisi, Mahikanta, Bo. P. 

Baxa, can/, s, d, uxdpar, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Baya, r. Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Bayanan, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Bayda, Goalpara dis, A. 

Bayra, /. 24-Peigunnahs dis, B. 

Bayra, Dacca dis, B. 

Battur Baldi Rai, Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bazar Bandi, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Bazarganw, Hagpur dis, C. P. 

Bazitpur, Durbhunea dis, Behar, B. 

Bazpur, Tarai dis, N. W. P. 

Beas, r. P. 

Beawar, can/, Aymeredis, R. A. 

Bedanga, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Bedar, Nizam's Dominions, H. 

Bedkihal, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Bednur, Mysore j. M. P. 

Bedsa, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Beerbhoom, dis, B. 

Begamabad, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Begamganj, s,d Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Begamganj, Noakholly dis, B. 

B^mpur, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

B^ari, r, Shikarpur dis. Bo. P. 

Begari Nandhi, r. Shikarpur dis. Bo. P. 

B^ewal, Amritsar dis, P. 

B^oo Serai, c.s, and s.d, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

B^un, s.d, Oodeypore s. R. A. 

Begunbari, Mymensinsh dis, B. 

Begunia, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Btt[unkudar,/ar, Manbhoom</tr, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Behal, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Behala, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Behar, pr, and s.d, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Behat,y?. Gwaliori. C. I. A. 

Behat, Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Behea, par, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Behula, r. Burdwan dis, B. 

Bekal, Etawah dis, N. W. P. 

Bekal, South Canara dis, M. P. 

Bel, r. Betul dis, C. P. 

Bela, Etawah dis, N. W. P. 

Bela, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Bela, Partabgarh dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bela, Rewah s. C, I. A. 

Bela, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Belaganj, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Beh^vi, Shimoga dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Belahariya, GorAhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Belamas Pakwani, Mozufferpore dis, Behar B. 



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( xiv ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



Belan, r. N. W. P. 

Belapur, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Belapur, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Belauri, h^ Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Belauti, Shahabad dis, Bebar, B. 

Belavriti, Shahabad dis^ Behar, B. 

Belawa, /./. Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Belda, Midnapore dis^ B. 

Belgachhi, Fnrreedpore dis^ B. 

Belgal, Dharwar dis, Bo. P. 

Belgam, «. Vizagapatam dis^ M. P. 

Belgaum, cant^ cap, and </tr„ Bo. P, 

Belghat, Gorakhpur dis^ N. W. P. 

Belghurriah, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Belhabans, jtor, Azamgarh </m, N. W. P. 

Belhar, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Beliaghata, Midnapore dis^ B. 

Beliaghata, 24*Peigunnahs dis^ 6. 

Bella Narayanpur, Moorshedabad du^ B. 

BeliapAtam, r. Malabar dis^ M. P. 

Beliati, Dacca dis^ B. 

Belikcri, r, Kanara disy Bo. P. 

Belka Nababganj, Rungpore dis^ B. 

Belkuchi, Pubna dis, B. 

Bellamkonda, m, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Bellankhigudd, Belp^aum dis. Bo. P. 

Bellary, cap^ and dts^ M. P. 

Bellavi, Tumkur </tr, Mysore s, M. P. 

Bellibetta, h, Hassan dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Belo, /. and tal^ Karachi ^»f, Sind, Bo. P. 

Belona, Nagpur dis^ C. P. 

Belondi, Ahmedna^ dis. Bo. P. 

Belpan, Bilaspur <4r, C. P. 

Belpathar, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Belpukuria, Nuddea dis, B. 

Belredurga, k, Kadur dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Belsand Kalan, Mozufferpore dis, Bdiar, B. 

Beltala, A. 

Beltangady, South Canara dis, M. P. 

Belur, Hassan dis, Mysore x, M. P. 

Belur, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Belwa, tatpa, Chumpamm dis, Behar, B. 

Belwari, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Bamaram,/. r. Chanda^rf, C. P. 

Bemla, r, Berar, H. A. D. 

Ben, r. P. 

Benahar, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Benapanjar, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Benares, cap, cant, div, and dis^ N. W. P. 

Benda, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Bengal, pr, B. 

Benganad, hcb, Coorg, M. P. 

Benganadmale, h, Coorg, M. P. 

Bengkoop, Thavetmyo dis, B. B. 

Bemachal, Sambalpur, cUs, C. P. 

Beni, Bhandara dis, C.P. 

Beniajuri, Dacca dis, B. 

Beniapukur, 24-Perfi[unnah$ dis, B. 

BeniganJ, Hardoi du, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Benipati, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Beni Rasulpur, Pumeah dis, Behar, B* 

Bennihalla, r. Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Bentinck, i, Mergui, Arch, B. B. 

Benuan, par, Durbhun^ dis, Behar, B« 

Benwalia, Shahabad dts, Behar, B. 

Beppunad, Kob^ Cooig, M. P, 



Ber, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Berach, r. Oodeypore x. R. A. 

Berah, Pubna <6x, B. 

Berah Faridpur, Pubna dis, B. 

Berai, par, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Berani, Hyderabad dis. Bo. P. 

Berar, Geographical designation of the H. A. D. 

Berchoi, Gwahor x. C. I. A. 

Bergi, Bannu dis, P. 

Berhampore, tal, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Berhampore, cant, andx.d/l Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Ben, or Behri, x. Bondelkhaod, C. I. A. 

Ben, Rohtak dis, P. 

Beria, Nimar dis, C. P. 

Beriya, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 

Berkheri, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Bersia, par, Bhopal x. C. I. A. 

Bertlhalla, r. Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Besargarh, ft, Gwalior x. C. I. A, 

Besli, r. Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Besu, r. N. W. P. 

Beswan, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Bet, Okhamandal dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Betagerigudd, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Betanga, Furreedpore dit, B. 

Betawad, par, Khandesh dis^ Bo. P. 

Bet^ari, Rungpore dis, B. 

BeUa, Mongh]rr dis, Behar, B. 

Betiarbil, bal, Burdwan dis, B. 

Betigeri, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Betman, par, Indore x. C. I. A. 

Betmangala, tal, Kolar dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Betna, r. 24-Peigunnahs dis, B. 

Bettadpur, Mysore dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Bettiah /. and s,d, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Bettyatnad, hob, Coorg, M. P. 

Betul, (Baitool) cap, and dis, C. P. 

Betulpudiangadi, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Betwa, r. Bhopal and Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Betwa, r. N. W. P. 

Beur, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Bewar, Hamirpur dis, N. W, P. 

Bewar, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Beypore, r. Malabar dis, M. P. 

Bezwada, /. and tal, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Bhabanhati, fair, Jessore dis, B. 

Bhabaniganj, Rungpore/^, B. 

Bhabaniganj Khal, khal, Noakholly cUs^ B. 

Bhabar, par, Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Bhabhar, tal, Radhanpur x. Bo. P. 

Bhabta, lappa, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Bhachao, Wagad dis, Cutch x. Bo. P. 

Bhadalia, Nuddea dis, B. 

Bhadan, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Bhadar, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Bhadarva,/. Balasinor x. Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

Bhadaur, r, P. 

Bhadaura, C. I. A. 

Bhadbhut, Broach dis. Bo. P. 

Bhaddarkali, Lahore dis, P. 

Bhader, r. Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Bhadgaon, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Bhadek, par, Jalaun ^ix, N. W. P. 

Bhadlin, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Bhadohi, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Bhadola, Buldana dis^ Berar, H. A. D. 



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( XV ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



Bhadra, beel, Rajshahye dis^ B. 

Bhadra, r. Jessore dis, B. 

Bhadra, r, Mysore s, M. P. 

Bhadra, s. Balaghat dis^ C. P. 

Bhadrachalam, /a/, Godavari dts^ M. P. 

Bhadran, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Bhadraoti, r. Kerowlee i. R. A. 

Bhadreswar, Hooehly dis^ B. 

Bhadribat, Moorsnedabad dis, B. 

Bhadro, Pooree dis^ Orissa, B. 

Bhadwa Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Bhadwar, par, Durbbunga dis^ Behar, B. 

Bhaga, r. Kangra dis, P. 

Bhagabanpnr, 24-Perguniiahs dis^ B. 

Bhagabadpar, Bardwan dis, B. 

Bhagalpnr, cap, and dis, Bduur, B. 

Bhagalur, 2. Salem dis, M. P. 

Bhagamandal, Coo^, M. P. 

Bhaghar, r. Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bhagirathi, r. Moorshedabad and Nuddea dis^ B. 

Bhagirathi, r. N. W. P. 

Bhago Thoro, h. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Bhagsu, san, Kangra dis, P. 

Bhagtanwala, Shahpur dis, P. 

Bhagur, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Bhagwa, Surat dit. Bo. P. 

Bhagwadandi, Surat dis^ Bo. P. 

Bhagwangola, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Bhagwanpur, Midnapore dis, B. 

Bhagwanpur, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Bhagwanpur, Saharanpnr dis, N. W. P. 

Bhagwantgarh, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Bhagwantnagar, par, Unao d/'t^, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bhagyakul, Dacca dis, B. 

Bhailan, J.df*. Aimere dis, R. A. 

Bhainsahi, r. N. W. P. 

Bhainsakhand, h, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Bhainsauda, Gwahor s, C. I. A. 

Bhainswal, Muzaffamagar dis^ N. W. P. 

Bhai Pheru, Lahore dis, P. 

Bhairab, Mymensing dis, B. 

Bhairab, r, Jessore and Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Bhairabar Chura, h. Goalpara dis, A. 

Bhairabi, r. Darrang dis, A. 

Bhairagnia, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Bhaironda, pttr, Bhopal s, C. I. A. 

Bhairosthan, /./. Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B« 

Bhairwa, h, Shahabad dis^ Behar, B. 

Bhaisaunday. Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Bhaisdehi, Bctul du, C. P. 

Bhaiswar, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Bhaja, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Bhajanghata Nuddea dis, B. 

Bhaiji, s. P. 

Bhakkar, /. and s, cU Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Bhakkar, dis, Sirohee s, R. A. 

Bhakhri, Jodhpore s» R. A. 

Bhakosa, r. Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bhal, Hissar dis, P. 

Bhala, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Bhala, r. Hanthawaddy dis, B. B. 

Bhalala, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Bhalatadagyee, Hanthawaddy dis, B. B. 

Bhale, Hanthawaddy eUs, B. B. 

Bhalka, par, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Bhallo, Lahore dis, P. 



Bhallowali, Sialkot dis, P. 

Bhalod, Rajpipla s, Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

Bhalua, k. Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Bhalluka, Nuddea dis, B. 

Bhaluni or Jakhni, fair, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Bhalusna, Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Bhama, r. Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Bhamer, par, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Bhamgarh, Nimar dis, C. P. 

Bhamo, Burmah. 

Bhamora, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Bhan, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Bhan, Shwegyeng dis, B. B. 

Bhanas Hivra, Ahmednagar dis, 60. P. 

Bhanbhwaigoon, Prome dis, B. B. 

Bhanboung, r, Prome dis, B. B. 

Bhanbyeng, Thayetmyo dis, B. B. 

Bhandak, par, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Bhandar, Raipur dis, C. P. 

Bhandanpur, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Bhandara, cap, and dis, C. P. 

Bhandardaha, /. Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Bhandaria, Backergune^e dis, B. 

Bhander, t, and par, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Bhandirban, fair, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Bhandak, /. and/tfr, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Bhandup, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Bhanga, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Bhangamora, Burdwan dis, B. 

Bhangar Hat, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Bhangi Khel, Bannu dis, P. 

Bhangoon, Thayetmyo dis, B. B. 

Bhangor, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Bhaniabhum, par, Midnapore dis, B. 

Bhanlcora, Aiimedabad dis, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Bhanlaw, Mergui dis, B. B. 

Bhanoung, Toungngoo dis, B. B. 

Bhanpura, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Bhanrer, k, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Bhantiari, Chittagong dis, B. 

Bhanpura, par, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Bhanugachh, h, Sylhet dis, A. 

Bhanwad, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Bhanwar, Rewah s. C. I. A. 

Bhaonra, par, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Bhapail, Saugoi dis, C. P. 

Bhar, /./. Basim dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Bharagara, Singhbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B* 

Bharak, k, Oodeypore j. R. A. 

Bharakau, Rawal Pindi dis, P. 

Bharangi, r. Kanara dis, Bo. P. 

Bharasimulia, 24-Pergunnahs ^f>,B. 

Bharatganj, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Bharatpur, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Bharaul, Mainpuri dis, N. W, P. 

Bhardap^arh, s. Chhindwara d^, C. P. 

Bhardai, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Bharejda, Kattywar Bo. P. 

Bhargabi, r. Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Bharhut, Rewah s. C. I. A. 

Bhari, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Bharkata, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Bharsula, t C. I. A. 

Bharthna, A and s.d. Etawah dis, N. W. P. 

Bharudpura, BAi/s, C. I. A. 

Bharum, r. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 



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( xvi ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



BharwarA, /ar, Dnrbhunga <Us^ Behar, B. 

Bharwari, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Bhasawar, dis^ Bhartpore /. R. A. 

Bhasmangi, h, Tumkur dis^ Mysore x. M. P. 

Bhastarah, Hooghly dis, B. 

Bhatala, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Bhatanwara, Rewah j. C I. A. 

Bhatgaon, s. Bilaspar dis^ C. P. 

Bhatgaon, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Bhatgawan, Rewah s. C. I. A. 

Bhatha, Surat dis^ Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Bhati, /. c, Sundarbans, B. 

Bhatiari, Chittagong dis, B. 

Bhatibari, far^ Jalpaiguri dis^ B. 

Bhatkal, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Bhatkuli, Amraoti dis^ Berar, H. A. D. 

Bhatner, Bickaneer s, R. A. 

Bhatori, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Bhatsa, r. Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Bhattian, Ludhiana dis^ P. 

Bhattiana, t. c, P. 

Bhattu, Hissarc^, P. 

Bhaturia, Burdwan dis^ B. 

Bhatwalia, Mozufierpore dis^ Behar, B. 

Bhatya, r. Ratnagiri disy Bo. P. 

Bhaugarh, Gwalior, s, C. I. A. 

Bhaunagar, s. Gohelwad iHs^ Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Bhaunrasa, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Bhaupur, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Bhaunr, par^ Durbhuoga dis, Behar, B. 

Bhaunri, Banda, dis^ N. W. P. 

Bhausink, Burdwan dis, B. 

Bhaushibangali, Mymensing dis^ B. 

Bhaud, Bamani x. C. I. A. 

Bhavali, Cooijg, M. P. 

Bhavani, r. Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Bhavanigiri, South Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Bhaw» r. Hanthawaddy dis^ B. B. 

Bhavral, Dacca </tx, B. 

Bhavral or Warbah, x. Khasi Hills dis^ A. 

Bhawana, Jhang dis^ P. 

Bhawaniganj, s,d, Rungpore dis^ B, 

Bhawanipur, xn^, Calcutta, B. 

Bhawara, Mozufierpore dis, Behar, B. 

Bhawdee, r. Thonkwa du, B. B, 

Bhawi, Jodhpore x. R. A. 

Bhawkata, r. Shwegyeng dis^ B. B. 

Bhawlay, rr. Hanthawaddy dis^ B. B. 

Bhawmee, Bassein dis^ B. B. 

Bhawnee, Shvregyeng <Ax, B. B. 

Bhawthabyegan, Hanthawaddy dis^ B. B. 

Bhawthaik, Amherst dis^ B. B. 

Bhayai, Thayetmyo disy B. B. 

Bhayawadar, Hallar dis^ Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Bhayndar, Thana dis^ Bo. P. 

Bheda, /or, Balasore dis^ Orissa, B. 

Bhedan, or Basaikela s. Sambalpur dis^ C. P. 

Bhedarganj, Furreedpore lAx, B. 

Bhedra, kHu^ Rijshahye dis, B, 

Bhedshi, Sawantwari x. Bo. P. 

Bheeleng, r. Shwegyeng dSrx, B. B. 

Bheeloogywon, i, Amherst dis^ B. B. 

Bhelaidiha, far, M anbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Bhelaipahan, Singhbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Bhelorachor, /or, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Bhemperio, 4. Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo, P. 



Bhengbyai, r. Totmgngoo dis^ B. B. 

Bhenglaing, r. Amherst dis, B. B. 

Bhera, t, and s»d Shahpur dis, P. 

Bheraghat, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Bheramuna, r. Symet dis, A. 

Bherasganvegudda, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Bherasgaon, Kanara <Ax, Bo. P. 

Bheswa, Dewas x. C. I. A. 

Bhetrai /. and cr. Tharrawaddy dis, B. B. 

Bhienda, r. Shwegyeng dis, B. B. 

Bhiendawtshiep, A Thonkwa dis, B. B. 

Bhiewan, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Bhikorai/Jodhpore x. R. A. 

Bhilad, Thana dis, Bo. P. 

Bhilauri, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Bhilawar, /or, Gya<^, Behar, B. 

Bhilolpur, Ludhiana ^, P. 

Bhilora,/ Sankhera Mewas, Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

Bhiloria, Mahikanta, Bo. P. 

Bhilsa, dis andy?. Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Bhilwar, par, Rajgarh x. C. I. A. 

Bhilwara, Oodeypore x. R. A. 

Bhima r. Ahmeanagar dis. Bo. P. 

Bhimar, Jodhpore, x. R. A. 

Bhimav Shankar, «. Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Bhimavaram, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Bhimbandh, Monghyr dis, B. 

Bhimbar, r. Budfiar, P. 

Bhimer Jangal,^V, Bogra dis, B. 

Bhimgad, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Bhum Ghora,/. /. Saharunpnr dis, N. W. P. 

Bhimlat, Tonk x. R. A. 

Bhimlat, Balaghat dis, C. P. 

Bhimnagar, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Bhimora, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Bhimpur, par, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Bhimsena, r. A. 

Bhim Tal, Kumann dis, N. W. P. 

Bhimtari, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Bhimwala, Rohtak dis, P. 

Bhinai, s,d, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Bhind, dis and ft. Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Bhindar, s.d, Oodeypore x. R. A. 

Bhinga, Bahraich tUs, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bhii^ar, Ahmednagar dis, Bo. P. 

Bhinmal, Jodhpore x. R. A. 

Bhira, Kheri <£x, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bhiri, Balaghat <&, C. P. 

Bhisi, Wardha dis, C. P. 

Bhiria, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Bhisi, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Bhitarbanda, Rungpore dis, B. 

Bhitarwar, Gwalior x. C. L A. 

Bhita Sarkandi, Monifferpore dis, Behar,; B. 

Bhitauli,/ar, Bara Banki <&, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bhitrigarh, A. Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

BhitnHh, dis, Sirohee x. R. A. 

Bhit Shah, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Bhiwandi, ia/, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Bhiwani, /. and s.d. Hissar dis, P. 

Bhiwapor, Nagpor dis, C P. 

Bhiwara, Poooa dis^ Bo. P. 

Bhodaw, /. and r. Bassdn dis, B. B. 

Bhodesar, A. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Ba P. 

Bhodoop, rr. Tbonkwa dis, B. B. 

Bhogai, r. Garo Hills ^x, A. 



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( xvii ) 
Alphabetical Index^ 



B. 

Bhoga Puram, r. Vizagapatam </«, M, P. 

Bh<^armang, r. Hazara dtSy P. 

Bhogawaddar, Kattywar, Bo, P. 

6h(^[awati, r. Colaba c/is. Bo. P. 

Bhogawati, r. H. A. D. 

Bhogawo, Hallar tiis, Kattywar, Bo. P, 

Bhognipur, Cawnpore diSf N. W. P. 

Bhc^rai, /ar, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Bhohtietrwa, Bassein <iV>, B. B. 

Bhoika, Jhallawad «^iV, Kattywar, Bo. P, 

Bhoio, /. Thar and Parkar, dis, Sind, Bo. P, 

Bhoja Kheri, Indore, s, C. I. A. 

Bhojpnr, Shahabad, cits, Behar, B. 

Bhogpur, Indore, j. C. I. A. 

Bhojpur, par, Furukhabad <//>, N. W. P. 

Bhojpur, ru, Bhopal, s, C, I. A. 

Bhojpura, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Bhola, r. Jessore, clis, B. 

Bhola, Backergunge dis B. 

Bholaganj, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 

Bholia, Indore x, C, I. A. 

Bhomara, Raipur dis, C. P, 

Bhomaraguri, /. r. Darrang dis, A, 

Bhombadi, Toungngoo dis, B, B. 

Bhomgarh, ft, Tonk s. R. A. 

Bhomoraguri, k. and/I r. Darrang ^>, A. 

Bbompura, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Bhondla, A. Damoh dis, C. P. 

Bhongaon, s.d, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Bhonti, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Bhoommawadee, Toungngoo dis, B. B, 

Bhooragyee, Hanthawaddy dis, B. B. 

Bhoorahla, r, Bassein dis, B. B. 

Bhooratshiep, Shwegyeng dis, B. B. 

Bhooro, r. Prome dis, B. B. 

Bhootkhyoung, d.c. Bassein dis, B. B. 

Bhootpyeng, Mergui dis, B. B. 

Bhopal, cap, and s, C. I. A. 

Bhopalpura, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Bhopawar, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Bhor, s. Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Bhorap, Bhor s. Satara dis. Bo. P, 

Bhorghat, /. Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Bhoreh, Samn dts, Behar, B. 

Bhoi^arh, Nasik dis, Bo. P, 

Bhorkas, Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Bhotarparbat, m, A. 

Bhotmari, Rungpore dis, B. 

Bhowanipore, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B, 

Bhown, Jhelum dis, P. 

Bhrigu, r. Mysore s, M. P. 

Bhuban, A. Cachar dis, A. 

Bhubaneshwar, sA. Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Bhubooah, /. and s. d, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Bhuddruck, s. d, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Bhudhargaiii, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Bhudwana, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Bhuikund, r. H. A. D. 

Bhuj, cap,, and dis, Cutch, s. Bo. P. 

Bhmpur, Kanthi dis, Cutch s. Bo. P. 

Bhulcapatnam, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Bhukarheri, /. and par, MuzafTamagar dis^ N. W. P. 

Bhukarki, Bickaneer x. R. A. 

Bhukhi, r. Broach dis. Bo. P. 

Bhuleshwar, A, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Bhulgamra, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P, 



BhtUlooah, or Noakhally dis, B. 

Bhum Bakeshwar, springs Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Bhuma, Sambalhera,/ar, Muzaffamagar dis, N.W.P. 

Bhumeshwar, A, Goalpara dis, A. 

Bhumsen, A, Jodhpore s, R. A, 

Bhundsi, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Bhung Bara, t,c, Sind, Bo. P, 

Bhungra, Banswara s, R. A. 

Bhunya Bankshal, <a, Midaapore dis, B, 

Bhupa, Muzaffamagar cUs, N. W. P. 

Bhupalpatnam t, and 2;. Bastar j. C. P. 

Bhur, par, Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bhurendi, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Bhurha, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B, 

Bhuria, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Bhurtipur, Sultan pur dis, Oudh, N. W. P, 

Bhurtpore, cap, and s. R. A. 

Bhusari, par, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Bhusawal, /. and tal, Khandesh dis. Bo. P, 

Bhushana, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Bhusru, r. Baghelkhand C. I. A, 

Bhuta, Bareilly dis, N. W, P. 

Bhutala, A, Oodeypore j. R. A. 

Bhutan, Indep. State, Nth Frontier, India, 

Bhutgeria, fair, Midnapore (Us, B. 

Bhuthan, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P, 

Bhuthi, r. Patna^/tJ, Behar, B. 

Bhutsar, par, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Bhuwanagiri, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

BhuwaneSiwar, sA, Pooree dis, B. 

Bhwaibenggan. d.c, Prome dis, B. B. 

Bhwotgyee, /. Tharrawaddy dis, B. B. 

Bhwotlay, r. and d^c, Thayetmyo dis, B, B, 

Biabanidata, /. /. C. I. A. 

Biak, r. Damoh dis, C. P. 

Biana, /. and dis, Bhurtpore t. R. A. 

Bians, p, Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Biaora, Rajgarh x. C. I. A. 

Bias, r, Bhopal s, C. I. A. and Saugor dis, C, P, 

Bibiani, r. Sylhet dis, A. 

Bibighat, SaUra dis. Bo. P. 

Bibiyana, r. Sylhet dis, A. 

Bichhan, r. Berar, H. A. D, 

Bichhraud, C. I. A. 

Bichor, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Bichpuri, Agra dis, N. W. P, 

Bichwa, Chhindwara </w, C. P, 

Bickaneer, cap, and s, R. A. 

Bid, Kolhapur j. Bo. P. 

Bidarkundi, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Bidasar, Bickaneer s, R. A. 

Bidauli, MuzafTanagar dis, N. W. P, 

Bideipur, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B, 

Bidhipur, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Bidhnu, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Bidhokhar, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P, 

Bidhuna, s,d, Etawah dis, N. W. P. 

Bidhupur, Mozufferpore dis, N. W. P, 

Bidi, /. and tal^ Belgaum dis. Bo. P, 

Bidra, Kanthi dis, Cutch s. Bo. P. 

Bidri, Jamkhandi s. Bo. P. 

Bidubazar, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Bidwal, C. I. A. 

Bidyadhari, r. 24-Pergunnahs dis, B, 

Bidyanandakati, Jessore dis, B. 

Bigga, Bickaneer x. R. A, 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



( xviii ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



B. 

Bighai, r. Backergunge dis, B. 

Bighola, Gurgaon dis^ P. 

Bihar, par, Partabgarh dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bihar, par, Unao dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bihar, r, Rewah j. C. I. A. 

Biharinath, h. Bankoora^/j, B. 

Bihat, / Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Bihonitola, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Bihora, /. Sankhera Me was, Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

Bihta, fair, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Bija, s» P. 

Bijaigarh, ft, and par, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Bijaipur, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P, 

Bijapur, /. and tal, Kaladgi dis, Bo. P. 

Bijapur, Santhal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B, 

Bijasan Mata, sh, Tonk s. R. A. 

Bijawar, s, Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Bijayanagar, ru. M. P. 

Bijbakar, Kashmiri. P. 

Bijbani, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Bijepur, Gwalior, s, C. I. A. 

Bijeraghogarh, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Bijgaon, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bijigarh, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Bijji, z. Bastar s. C. P. 

Bijli, «. Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Bijna,y. Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Bijnaur,/«r, Lucknow dis, Oudh, N. W, P. 

Bijni, doar, Goalpara dis, A. 

Bijnor, cap, and dis, N. W. P. 

Bijoli, Gwalior 5. C. I. A. 

Bijua, h, Jubbulpore dh, C. P. 

Bikapur, s,d. Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bikampur, Jeysulmere ;. R. A. 

Bikampur, s,d, Dacca dis, B, 

Bikram, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Bikrampur, /. and s,d. Dacca dis, B. 

Bilahad, hob, Coorg, M. P. 

Bilahri, par, Tarai dis, N. W. P. 

Bilaichhari, Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Bilaichhari Tan, k, Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Bilaigarh, z, Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Bilanda, Falehpur dis. N. W. P. 

Bilara, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Bilari, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 

Bilasipara, Goalpara dis, A. 

Bilaspur, cap, and dis, C. P. 

Bilaspur, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Bilaspur, s. P. 

Bilaspur, Umballa dis, P. 

Bilaspur, Durbhanga dis, Behar, B. 

Bilasupara, Goalpara dis, A. 

Bilauda, Western Malwa Circle, C. I. A. 

Bilauja, par, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Bil-bari, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Bil-baril, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Bilchhi, /./. Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Bilga, JuUundur dii, P. 

Bilgaon, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Bilgi, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Bilgi, Kanara dis, Bo. P. 

Bilgram, /. and s, d, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bilhaur, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Biligirirangabetta, k, Mysore j. M. P. 

Bilihra, e, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Bilimora, Surat dis, Bo. P. 



B. 

Bilkeshwar, Mahadeo, p,p, Bhil Circle, C. I. A. 

Bilkha, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Bil-Makhasa, /. Mymensingh dis, B. 

Bilolpur, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Bilpatta, par, Santhal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Bilram, par, Etah dis, N. W. P. 

Bilri, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Bilsauda, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Bilsi, Budaun dis, N. W. P. 

Biltara, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Biluabazar, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Bimlipatam, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Bina, r, Bhopal s, C. I. A. 

Bina, r. Saugor dis, C. P. 

Binagaon, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Binaika, Saugor dis. C. P. 

Binauli, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Binawar, Budaun dis, N. W. P. 

Binayakpur, par, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Bindaura, Bara Banki dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Bindhachal, /./. Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Bindki, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Bindra Nawagarh, z, Raipur dis, C. P. 

Bindwara, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Binjai, r, Singhbhoom' </ij, Chota Nagporc, B. 

Binjharpur, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Binpara, fair, 24- Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Binpur, Midnapore dis, B. 

Birahna, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Birai, r. Bankoora^tV, B. 

Biraicha, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Biraldaha, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Biranasi, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Birani, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Birat, fair, Bogra dis, B. 

Birbandar, Midnapore dis, B. 

Birchandrapur, fair, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Birchigaon, /. Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Birdha, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

Bireji Kur, r, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Birganj, Dinagepore dis, B. 

Birgaon, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Birhar, par, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Biria, Ghazipur dis N. W. P. 

Birjeshji, sh, Tonk s, R. A. 

Birkul, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Birkul, par, Midnapore dis, B. 

Birnagar or Ula, Nuddea dis, B. 

Bimu, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 

Birpur, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Birpur, Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Birsilpur, Jeysulmere s. R. A. 

Birsingpur, par, Rewah s,Q, I. A. 

Birthu, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

BixM, fair, Lohardugga dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Birul, Wardha dis, C. P. 

Biiupa, r, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Birur, Kadur dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Biiwar, Colaba dis. Bo. P. 

Bisalkhanda, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Bissalnagar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Bisalpur, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Bisalpur, Jodhpore s. R. A. 

Bisanda, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Bisara Chakla, MozufTerpore dis, Behar, B. 

Bisauli, Budaun dis^ N. W. P. 



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Google 



( xix ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



B. 

Bissawar, Muttra dis, N. W. P. 

Bisbhuji, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Bishangarh, Fatehgarh </i>, N. W. P. 

Bisbanpur, Mozufiferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Bisbanpur, Gorakbpur dis^ N. W. P. 

Bisbgacbba, beel^ Rajsbabye dis^ B. 

Bisbkbali, r. Jessore and Backergunge dis, B. 

Bisbnatb, Dartan^ dis, A. 

Bisbnugar, Hazanbagh </iV, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Bisbnupur, Bankoora </ij, B. 

Biskobar, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Bisnur, Wardba dis. C. P. 

Bisoi, r. Fyzabad dis, Oudb, N. W. P. 

Bisrampur, Lobardugga dis, Cbota Nagpore, B. 

Bisrampur, Raipur dis, C. P. 

Bissau, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Bissemkatak, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Bissli, p. Soutb Canara dis, M. P. 

Bistbazari, par, Mongbyr dis, Bebar B. 

Bistupur, 24 Parganas dis, B. 

Bisubi, r. Gonda dis, Oudb, N. W. P. 

Biswa, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Biswak, par, Patna dis, Bebar, B. 

Biswan, t, and s.d. Sitapur dis, Oudb, N. W. P. 

Biswanatb, Darrang dis, A. 

Bitangarb, Abmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Bithaid, h, Cuddapab dis, M. P. 

Bitbalang Akra, Um, Sylhet dis, A. 

Bitbangul, A. 

Bitbar, Unao dis, Oudb, N. W. P. 

Bithur, /. And p.p. Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Biwai, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Biwar, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Boalmari, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Bobbin, z, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Bocbaba, par, Durbbun^ dis, Bebar, B. 

Boda, /. and par, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Boda, Rungpore dis, B. 

Bodamaw, Akyab dis, B. B. 

Bodai, A. Burdwan dis, B. 

Bodasakurru, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Bodban, Surat dis, Bo. P. 

Bodban, Abmednagar dis, Bo. P. 

Bodb Gya, p.p. BxiSp.A.i, Gya dis, Bebar, B. 

Bodhigaon, Abmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

BodhkhsuatL, /air, Jessore dis, B. 

Bodinayakanur, z, Madura dis, M. P. 

Bodma, r. Sontbal Pergunnahs dis, Bebar, B. 

Bodwad, par, Kbandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Bogapani or Bograb, r, Kbasi and Janitia Hills d^, A. 

Bogoola, Nuddea dis, B. 

Bogra. £ap, and dis, B. 

Bogree, /ar, Midnapore dis, B. 

Bohar, u&ccsidis, B. 

Bobar, Robtak dis, P. 

Bobar, Burdwan dis, B. 

Bobarkuli, Burdwan dis, B. 

Boileauganj, su^, Simla, Simla dis, P. 

Boincbee, Hooghly dis, B. 

Boisar, Tbana, dis Bo. P. 

Bokakbat, Sibsagar dis, A. 

Bokhyoop, Hantbawaddy dis, B. B. 

Bolai, r. A. 

Bolan, ^. Balucbistan. 

Bolangir, Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Bolaram, cani, Nizam*s Dominions, II. 



B. 

Bollur, Coorg, M. P. 

Bolpur, /. and s.d. Beerbboom dis, B. 

Boltban, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Bolundra, Mabikanta, Bo. P. 

Bombadi, Toungngoo dis, B. B. 

Bombay, cap, Bo. Presidency. 

Bombra, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Bommayakupam, z. Salem dis, M. P. 

Bomori, Bundelkbund, C. I. A. 

Bonabari, d€e/, Rajsbabye dis, B. 

Bonai, s. Cbota Nagpore, B. 

Bond, r. Tubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Bonda, Shajahanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Bonda, Jbansi dis, N. W. P. 

Bonganw, Mymensingb dis, B. 

Bongaon Mohisi, Bbagalpur dis, Bebar B. 

Bongong, /. and s. d, Nuddea dis, B. 

Bood-bood, /. and s.d. Burdwan dis, B. 

Boodoong, Akyab dis, B. B. 

Boondee, cap, and s. R. A. 

Boppagandanpur, Mysore dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Bor, r, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Bora, Hooghly dis, B. 

Boraeta, Bheel Circle, C. I. A. 

Boragari, Rungpore dis, B. 

Borain, Manbhoom dis, Cbota Nagpore, B» 

Borakhari, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Borala, Jhang dis, P. 

Borasamar, z. Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Borawar, Jodhpore s. R. A. 

Bordi, r. Berar, H. A. D. 

Borgaum, Nimar dis, C. P. 

Borgaon, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D» 

Borgbat, A. Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Borghat, Tbana dis. Bo. P. 

Bori, Banswara s. R. A. 

Bori, Akalkot s. Bo. P. 

Bori, Bbeel Circle, C. I. A. 

Bori, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Bori, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Bori, r. Kbandesb dis. Bo. P. 

Bona, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Boriavi, Kaira dis. Bo. P. 

Bori Bandar, Bombay, Bo. P. 

Bomar, par, Kbandesb dis. Bo. P. 

Borsad, /. and fai, Kaira dis, Bo. P. 

Borwali, Tbana dis. Bo. P. 

Botad, Gobelwad dis, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Botar, /. Tbar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Botewabi, r. Cbanda dis, C. P. 

Botba, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Bowringpet, Kolar dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Bowsee, /./. Bbagalpur dis, Bebar, B. 

Boyikere, Coorg, M. P. 

Boyirani, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Brabmadesam, Nortb Arcot dis, M P. 

BrabmagaoR, Abmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Brabmagiri, A, Malabar </i>, M. P. 

Brabmagiri, A. Coorg, M. P. 

Brabmagiri, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Brabmagiri A. Kolar dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Brabmakund, pool, Lakhimpur dis, A. 

Brabmanabad, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Brahmanbai, par, Hazaribagb dis, Ch. Nagpore, B* 

Brabmanbbum, s.d, Midnnpore dis, B. 

Brabmangaon, Abmednagar dis, Bo. P. 



Digitized by 



Google 



( XX ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



B. 

Brahmangaon, Cachar cUs^ A. 

Brahmangaon, par^ Indore s. C. I. A. 

Brahmangaon, Nasik dis^ Bo. P. 

Brahmani, r, Moorshedabad disj B. 

Brahmani, r. Cuttack dis^ Orissa, B. 

Brahmanwara, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Brahmapur, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Brahmapuri, /. and s.d, Chanda dts^ C. P. 

Brahmaputra, r. Assam and Bei^l. 

Brahmjoni, h. Gya dis^ Behar, B. 

Brahmunberiah, /. and s, d, Tipperab <A>, B. 

Braj, disy Bhnrtpore s, R. A. 

Brindaban, t. and/. /. Mattra dis, N. W. P. 

Broach, capy and dis^ Bo. P. 

Bruceabad, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Bubak, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Bucheke, Montgomery dis^ P. 

Buchera, Lalitpur dis^ N. W. P. 

Budaband, Basti dii, N. W. P, 

Budalur, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Budaun, cap^ and dis^ N. W. P. 

Buddhair, h, Gya dis^ Behar, B. 

Buddiyer, r, Kistna dis^ M. P. 

Budge Budge, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Budhabalanga, r. Balasore dis^ Orissa, B. 

Budhana, /. and s, d, Muzafifamagar dis, N. W. P. 

Budh Gya, Gya dis, Behar B. 

Budhhata, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Budhlada, Kamal dis, P. 

Budhpur, Manbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Budihal, tal, Chitaldroog rfw, Mysore s. M. P. 

Budikot, Kolar dis, Mysore, M. P. 

Budnur, Betul </m, C. P. 

Budur, «. Tinnevelly dis, M. P» 

Bughipura, Ferozepore dis, P. 

Bujh, Jeysulmere s. R. A. 

Bukanheri, Umballa dis^ P. 

Bukhari, J hang dis^ P. 

Bukhtiarpore, Patna dis^ Behar, B, 

Bukkur, Shikarpur dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Bulandshahr, cap, and dis^ N. W. P. 

Buldana) cap, and dis^ Berar, H. A. D. 

Bulri, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Bul-Tul, /. Kashmir s. P. 

Bulsar, /a/, Surat dis, Bo. P. 

Bunagati, Jessore dis, B. 

Bundala, Amritsar </w, P. 

Bundelkhand, /r. C. I. A. 

Bunder, /a/, Kistna dis^ M. P. 

Bundi, Bahraich dis^ Oudh N. W. P. 

Bundu, Ix>hardugc;a dis^ Chota Nagpore, B. 

Bunga, Umballa oif, P. 

Bai£ar, r, Jhelum dis^ P. 

Burabalang, r. Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Burai, r. A. 

Burajangal, Thelnm dis^ P. 

Buramantreshwar, r. 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Buray, r, Khandesh </w, Bo. P. 

Burdwan, cap^ dU^ and div, B. 

Burghur, h, and r. Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Bnrgi. Jubbulpore dis^ C. P. 

Burha, cap, Balaghat dis, C. P. 

Burha, r, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Burhapara, par^ Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Burhanpur s, d, Nimar dis, C. P. 

Buihee, Hazaribagh dii^ Chota Nagpore, B. 



B. 

Burhganga, r. N . W. P 

Burhi Rapti, r. Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Burhnadi, r. Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Burhner, r. Mandla dis, C. P. 

Burhpur, par, Bijnor dis, N. W. P. 

Buri, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Burl Dihing, r. A. 

Burigang, r. A. 

Burigang, r. Tipperah dis, B. 

Buriganga, r. Dacca dis, B. 

Burigangal/tfr, Pumeah <^«, Bdiar, R 

Buriganj,/«>, Bogra ^ikV, B. 

Burirhat, Rungpore, dis, B. 

Burirhat, Fnrreedpore dis, B. 

Burishwar, r. Bacicergunge dis^ B. 

Buriyah, Umballa dis, B. 

Burj Bangla, Peshawar dis, P. 

„ Baoli, Do. 

,, Bara, Do* 

,, Bara Khushk, Do. 

,, Bara Tar, Do. 

,, Dangar2^ Do. 

,, Dheri, Do. 

„ Garhi Babu, Do. 

„ Garhi Sirdar, Do. 

„ Ghora Shah, Do. 

,, Hari Singh, Do. 

„ Jangli, Do. 

„ Katti Khel, Do. 

„ Kimd, Do. 

,, Ladaur, Do. 

,, Mian Isa, Do. 

,, Nihalpura, Do. 

,, Nihangan, Do. 

„ Pabhi, Do. 

,, Paoka, Do. 

,, Pir Piai, Do. 

„ R^, Do. 

,, Saidu, Do. 

,, Shamshattu, Do. 

„ Shigi, Do. 

„ Wattar, Do. 

Burji, Bannu dis, P. 
Burmah, British /r. 

Burmah, Kingdom, E. Frontier of India. 
Burrisal c, s. and s. d. Backergunge dis, B. 
Buru Dihing, r. A. 

Burur, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 
Burwe, Lohardugga dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 
Busseerhat, s. d. 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 
Butala, Gujranwala dis, P. 
Butala, Amritsar dts, P. 
Butana, Rohtak dis, P. 
Buthi, Shikarpur dis, Bo. P. 
Bnxar, /. and s. d, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 
Byadgi, Dharwar dis, Bo. P. 
Byahatti, Dharwar dts, Bo. P. 
Byatanga, Furreedpore dis, B. 
Byataiayan-betta, A, Kolar dis, Mysore s, M. P. 
Byculla, sud. Bombay, Bo. P. 
Byee, r. Sandoway dis, B. B. 
Byndoor, South Canara dis, M. P. 
Byohari, Rewah j, C . I. A. 
Byoogan, Thayetmyo dis, B. B. 
Byoogoon, Prome dis, B. B. 
Byragania, Mozufferpore dis, Behar B» 



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( xxi ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



o. 

Cachar, canij cap, and dis^ A. 

Calcutta, cap, of Indian Empire, B. 

Calicut, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Calimere Point, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Calingapatam, Ganjam disj M. P. 

Camlxiy, j, Bo. P. 

Camel's hump, m, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Campbellpur, cant, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Campoli, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Candahar, pr, Afghanistan, 

Cannanore, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Canning Town, 24-Pergannahs dis, B. 

Captainganj, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Caragola, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Cardamom Hills, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Cashmere or Ka^^mir, s, P. 

Cassergode, tal, South Canara dis, M. P. 

Cauvery, r, M. P. 

Cawnpore, cant, cap, and dis, N. W. P. 

Chabbiskudd, B. 

Chabhal, Amritsar dis, P. 

Chablat, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Chabua, Lakhimpur dis, A. 

Chachai, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Chachari, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Chachora, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Chachra, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Chachran, dis, P. 

Chachrauli, /. and r. P. 

Chachri, Hyderabad dis. Bo. P. 

Chachhund, Etawah dis, N. W. P. 

Chadchat, Radhanpur x. Bo. P. 

Chadya Bariarpur, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Chaesa, Delhi dis, P. 

Chagalmurri, Kumool dis, M. P. 

Chagalnaya, Tipperah dis, B. 

Chagaza, r. Thar and Parkar, dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Chagdah, Nuddea cUs, B. 

Chah Bereri, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Chah Kanjri, Amritsar dis, P. 

Chah Nau, Lahore dis, P. 

Chah Sikandar, Rohtak dis, P. 

Chai, par, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Chail, par, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Chaingawan, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Chainpur, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Champur, r, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Chainpur, par, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Chaital, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Chaitanpur, or Kayjama, h, Singhbhoom dis, Chota 

Nagpore, B. 
Chaitpet, South Arcot dis, M. P. 
Chai Doab, d.c, P. 
Chak, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Chakai, /. and par, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 
ChakaltoT, fair, Manbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 
Chakan, Voouk dis. Bo. P. 

Chakardharpur, Sighbhoom dis, Chotanagpore, B. 
Chakaria, Chittagong dis, B. 
Chakarnagar, Etwah dis, N. W. P. 
Chak Bhatti, Gujranwala dis, P. 
Chakdeo, Satara dis. Bo. P. 
Chakdighi, Burdwan dis, B. 
Chakdihi, Rewah j. C. I. A. 
Chak Dilawari, par, Purneah dis, Behar, B. 
Chakholahri, Gurdaspur dis, P. 



Chaki, r. Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Chakia. s,d, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Chakiria. Chittagong dis, B. 

Chak Ismailpur, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Chakkanadi, r. South Canara dis, M. P. 

Chakia Fatehpur, Rungpore dis, B. 

Chakia Kajirhat, Rungpore dis, B. 

Chaklakere, Chitaldroog dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Chaklasi, Kaira dis. Bo. P. 

Chakmani, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Chakmanjo, Hazaribag^h ais, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Chakoha, Jhelum dis,V, 

Chakradharpur, Singhbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Chak Ramdas, Shahpur dis, P. 

Chakrata, cant, and san, Dehra Dun dis, N. W. P. 

Chakratirtha, r. Mysore s, M. P. 

Chakwal, Jhelum dis, P. 

Chakwara, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Chalakudi, r. Cochin s, M. P. 

Chalan, dec/, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Chalanmari, fair, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Chaldu, r. C. I. A. 

Chaliar, s, Pandu Mewas, Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

Chalisgaon, ta/, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 

Challapalli, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Chaltabania, Backergunge dis, B. 

Chalwani, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Chamadago, A. Salem dis, M. P. 

Chamal, /. Sirsa dis, P. 

Chamal, Gurdaspnr dis, P. 

Chaman, Kelat or Baluchistan. 

Chamardi, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Chamargam, Broach dis. Bo. P. 

Chamarlakolta, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Chamba, Hazara dis, P. 

Chamba, r. an^ s, P. 

Chambal, r. C. I. A. and R. A. 

Chambar, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Chambramallai, A. Malabar dis, M. P. 

Chamkor, Umballa dis, P. 

Chamla, r. C. I. A. 

Chamnai, r. Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Chamorchi, par, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Chamordi, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Chamorsi, Chandsi dis, C. P. 

Champa, z, Bilaspnr dis, C. P. 

Champa, par, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Champagar, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Champahati, 24 Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Champamad, r, Goalpara dis, A. 

Champanagar, Bhagulpur dis, Behar, B. 

Champapur, Bogra dis, B. 

Champaner, p.A.i, Panch Mehals dis, Bo. P. 

Champawat, Kumaon dis, N. W. P. 

Chamrajnagar, Mysore dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Chamraura, r. Partabgarh dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Chamundibetta, k, Mysore dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Chamursi, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Chamyari, Amritsar dis, P. 

Chanarayandurga, ft. Tumkur dis, Mysore s, M, P. 

Chanasarma, Barodaj. Bo. P. 

Chanaud, Jodpore s, R. A. 

Chanchal, MaJdah dis, B. 

Chanchra, Jessore dis, B. 

Chand, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Chand, Cbhindwara dis, C. P. 



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( xxii ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



Chanda, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Chanda, cap, and dis, C. P- ,, ^ ^ p 

Chanda,/. Sultanpur ^tJ, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Chandaghanti, h. Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Chandaha, r, Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Chandai, khal, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Chandaikona, Bogra dis, B. 

Chandaka, Pooree dis, Onssa, B. 

Chandala, «. Chanda (/t J, C. P. 

Chandalai, /ar, Rajshahye </w, B. 

Chandalgarh or Chunar, //. and cant, Mirzapur dts, 

N. W. P. ^ _ 

Chandan, r. Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 
Chandana, Jeypore s. R. A. 
Chandana r. Furreedpore dts, B. 
Chandan Bhuka,/ar. Monghyr rf». Behar, B. 
Chandan Katuria, par, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, IS. 
Chandankhera, Chanda dis, C. P. 
Chandanpukur, 24-Pergunnahs dts, B. 
Chandarbhaka, r. Oodeypore s. R. A. 
ChandarChar, A. 
Chandar Dinga, h, h, 
Chandami, Mahikanta, Bo. P. 
Chandas, Basim dis, Berar, H. A. D. 
Chandauli, Benares r/«J, N. W. P. 
Chandaus, Aligarh dis, N. \y. P. 
Chandausi, Moradabad ^«^» N- W. P. 
Chandaut, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 
Chandawa, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Chandawal, Jodhpore s. R. A. 
Chandawar, Kanara dts, Bo. P. 
Chandbali, Balasore dis, Onssa, B. 
Chandelghat,/.J. Kolhapur J. Bo. P. 
Chanderi, Gwalior J. C. I. A. 
Chandernagore, French s, Hooghly dts, B. 
Chandgad, Belgaum dis, Bo. P. 
Chandia, Rewah s, C. I. A. 
Chandigarh, Umballa dts, P-. ^ , _ 
Chandisthan, sh. Monghyr dts, Behar, B. 
Chanditala, Hooghly </!>. B. 
Chandka, Pooree ^i.s Onssa, B. 
Chandkhali, Jessore dis, B. 
Chandni, beel, Rajshahye dts, B. 
Chandod, Baroda J. Bo. P. ,, . _^ 
Chandol, Buldana </«, Berar, H. A. U. 
Chandole, Kistna dis, M. P. 
Chandor, /a/, Nasik dis, Bo. P. 
Chandpur, Gwalior J. C. I- A. 
Chandpur, Bijnor dis, N. \y. P. 
Chandpur, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Chandpur, Jessore dis, B. 
Chandpur, Tipperah dis, B. 
Chandpura, par, Bhopal j. C. I. A. 
Chandra, Jessore dis, B. 
Chandra, Midnapore dis, B. 
Chandra, r. Kangra ^r^, P. ,, ^ ,„ p 
Chandra, r. Sitapur ^tJ, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Chandrabhaga, r. Berar, H. A. D. 
Chandrabhaga, r. Beerbhoom dts, B. 
Chandrabati, ^^^/, Rajshahye dis, B. 
Chandraganj, A. ^. *, « 

Chandragiri, r. South Arcot dts, M. P. 
Chandragiri, /. and /«/, North Arcot dts,M,T. 
Chandragutti, Ji, Shimoga dis, Mysore j. M. P. 
Chandrabati, Muzufferpore dis, Behar, B. 
Chandrakona, Midnapore dis, B. 



Chandranadi, r. South Canara //fV, M. P. 

Chandranagar, Hooghly dis, B. (Chandernagore.) 

Chandranagaram, A. Trinchinopoly dis, M. P. 

Chandranath, A, Chittagong dis, B. 

Chandraprabha, r. N. W. P. 

Chandrapur, «. Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Chandrawal, r. Hamirpur ^iV, N. W. P. 

Chandrawati,/.A.f. Sirohee j. R. A. 

Chandsain, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Chandsar, par, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 

Chanduli, Burdwan dis, B. 

Chandupura, Indore s. C. I. A. 

Chandur, South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Chandur, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Chandur, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Chandur Bazar, Ellichpur .its, Berar H. A. D. 

Chanduria, 24-Pe^^nnahs dis, B. 

Chandwa,/ar, Bhagalpur <//j, Behar, B. 

Chandwak, Jaunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Chandwari, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Chandwasa, par, Indore s. C. I. A. 

Chanesar Koloi, Hyderabad dis, Bo. P. 

Chang, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Changa Manga, Lahore dis, P. 

Changara, par, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagporc, B. 

Chang Bhakar, s. Chota Nagpore, B. 

Changeri, Gwalior s. C.I. A. 

Changlagali, Hazara^/V, P. 

Changrezhing, Bashahr, s, P. 

Chanesil, m, Bashahr, s, P. 

Chanigot, Bahawalpur s, P. 

Chanki, Chumparum dis, Behar, B. 

Channagiri, Shimoga dis, Mysore, s. M. P. 

Channakeshavanbetta, A. Kolar dis, Mysore s. M.P. 

Channapatna, Mysore dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Channapatna, Bangalore dis, Mysore, s, M. P. 

Channaraydinga A. Tumkur dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Channaraypatna, Hassan dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Channu, Mooltan dis, P. 

Champatia, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Chanrajpatna, Hassan, dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Chantapilly, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Chanu Tan, A. Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Chanwaria, A. Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Chanwarpatha, /. and s,d. Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

Chaoncha, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Chapai Maldah dis, B. 

Chapar, Mozaffamagar </fV, N. W. P. 

Chaparimukh, Nowgong dis, A, 

Chapewali, Amritsar dis, P. 

Chaphal, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Chapi, Tonk s, R. A. 

Chapila, AAal, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Chappar, Umballa </«, P. 

Chappara, Seoni dis, C. P. 

Chapra, Nuddea dis, B. 

Chapra, /. and s.d. Sarun dis, B. 

Chaprar, Sialkot dis, P. 

Chaprasikhal, AAal, Noakholly dis, B. 

Chaprauli, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Chapri, A. 

Chapri, A, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Charai, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Charai Deo, A. 

Charambody, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Charang, /. Bashahr s, P. 



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( xxiii ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



Charanpur, Biirdwan rfiV, B. 

Charbhujaji, sh. Tonk j. R. A. 

Charchan, Kaladgi dis^ Bo. P. 

Charchaumuian, sh, Tonk s. R. A. 

Charda, /. Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Charduar,/.r. Darrang </t>, A. 

Charghat, Rajshahye dis^ B. 

Chargola, Cant,. Cachar^u, A. 

Charikaria, r. A, 

Charing, A. 

Charka, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Charkhai, Sylhet dis, A. 

Charkhari, s. Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Charkhari, Hamirpur dis^ N. W. P. 

Charki, Jalaun, dis, N. W. P. 

Charla, /. and /a/, Godavari dis, C. P. 

Charmadi, /. South Canara dis^ M. P. 

Charon, Ahmedabad dis^ Bo. P. 

Charpeta, Noakholly dis, B. 

Charra, Manbhoom disy Chota Nagpore, B, 

Charsadda, Peshawar </iV, P. 

Charsidhi, Noakholly dis, B. 

Charthawal, Mozaffamagar dis^ N. W. P. 

Charwah, Hoshangabad dis^ C. P. 

Chas, Manbhoom dis^ Chota Nagpore, B. 

Chas, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Chata, Muttra dis, N. W. P. 

Chatachura, h, A. 

Chatala, A. 

Chatari, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Chatia, A. 

Chatingram, Bogra dis, B. 

Chatkabeli, Lunawara s, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Chatia Fen, Cachar dis, A. 

Chatmohar, Pubna dis, B. 

Chatna, Bankoora dis^ B. 

Chatna, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Chatra, beei, Maldah dis, Behar, B. 

Chatra, s.d. Hazaribagh dis^ Chota Nagpore, B. 

Chatsu, diSy Jeypore s. R. A. 

Chatua, Chumparun diSy B. 

Chaturbhui, p.p, Oodeypore s. R. A. 

Chaturbhuj, sh. Tonk s. R. A. 

Chaubar, pary Shahabad diSy Behar, B. 

Chaubara, Dera Ismail Khan diSy P. 

Chaubaria, Nuddca diSy B. 

dhaubattia, Kumaon diSy N. W. P. 

Chaubepur, Benares diSy N. W. P. 

Chaubepur, Cawnpore, disy N. W. P. 

Chaudand, Chumparun disy Behar, B. 

Chauddagram, Tipperah disy B. 

Chauddakulat, /ar, Pooree diSy Orissa, B. 

Chaudhwan, Dera Ismail Khan disy P. 

Chaugachha, Jessore diSy B. 

Chaugaon, /ar, Rajshahye ^i>, B. 

Chaugharia, Burdwan diSy B. 

Chaughat, Malabar diSy M. P. 

Chauk, Thana diSy Bo. P. 

Chauka, r. Bahraich diSy Oudh, N. W. P. 

Chauka Khetri, /ar, Jalpaiguri diSy B. 

Chauk Kalan, Patna diSy Behar, B. 

Chauk Shikarpur, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Chaukhat, A. 

Chaukidanga, Burdwan dis, B. 

Chaukijadid, Rawalpindi dis^ P. 

Chaul, Colaba dis, Bo. P. 



o. 

Chaulkhola, Midnapore disy B. 

Choul Khoya, r. Kamrup diSy A. 

Chaumahla, Bareilly diSy N. W. P. 

Chaumukh, Midnapore disy B. 

Chaumukha, sh, Tonk s, R. A. 

Chaumun, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Chaunsa, Shahabad diSy B. 

Chaunsathipara, Cuttack diSy Orissa, B. 

Chauntra, Rawalpindi diSy P. 

Chaupan, Mirzapur diSy N. W. P. 

Chaura, diSy Siroheej. R. A. 

Chauradadar, h, Mandla diSy C. P. 

Chauragarh, ^. Narsingpur, diSy C P. 

Chaurahi, Chhindwara diSy C. P. 

Chaurao, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Chaurashi, par, Manbhoom diSy Chota Nagpore B. 

Chaurasi, s.d. Mirzapur diSy N. W. P. 

Chauria, z. Balaghat diSy C. P. 

Chauri, -Chaura, Gorakhpur oYj, N. W. P, 

Chausa, par. Shahabad diSy Behar, B. 

Chausana, Mozaffamagar dis, N. W. P. 

Chautala, Sirsa diSy P. 

Chauth ka Barwara, Je)rpore s, R. A. 

C ha wand, Poona diSy Bo. P. 

Chawara, Monghyr diSy Behar. B. 

Chawari, Dharwar diSy Bo. P. 

Chawinda, Sialkot diSy P. 

Cheduba, /. and /. Kyoukphyoo diSy B. B. 

Chelar, Thar and Parkar diSy Sind, Bo. P. 

Chelojhangi, Rawalpindi diSy P. 

Chelyama, pary Manbhoom diSy Chota Nagpore, B. 

Chemudu, z. Vizagapatam diSy M. P. 

Chenab, r. P. 

Chenari, Shahabad disy Behar, B. 

Chendavol, Kistna diSy M. P. 

Chendia, Kanara diSy Bo. P. 

Chendwar, //. Hazaribagh diSy Chota Nagpore, B. 

Chengalrayan's Choultry, Chingleput diSy M. P. 

Chengama, /. South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Chengarkhal, r. Sylhet diSy A. 

Chengmari, pary Jalpaiguri diSy B. 

Chenkand, h. Salem diSy M. P. 

Chennagiri, Shimoga diSy Mysore s. M. P. 

Chenpur, par, Singhbhoom disy Chota Nagpore, B. 

Chenraidrug, Cuddapah diSy M. P. 

Chepauk, Malabar diSy M. P. 

Cherakal, Malabar diSy M. P. 

Cheram Phang, A. • 

Cherand, Saran dis. Behar, B. 

Cherat, canty and san, Peshawar dis, P. 

Cherekapar, A. • 

Cheria Bariarpur, Monghyr disy Behar, B. 

Cherpulchari, Malabar diSy M. P. 

Cherra or Sohrah, s. Khasi and Taintia Hills dis, A. 

Cherrapoonjee, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 

Chetganj, Benares diSy N. W. P. 

Chetia, Bahraich diSy Oudh, N. W. P. 

Chetla, 24-Pe^unnahs diSy B. 

Chetmai, Malabar diSy M. P. 

Chelput, Chingleput diSy M. P. 

Chetput, North Arcot diSy M. P. 

Chetterpore, t. and /a/, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Cheuhli, Khandesh, diSy Bo. P. 

Chevendra, z. Kistna diSy M. P. 

C hey air, r. Cuddapah diSy M. P. 

Cheyur, Chingleput dis, M. P. 



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( xxlv ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



o. 

Chhabni, /. and dis, Tonk s. R. A. 

Chhabramau, Farukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Chhagalnaia, Tipperah </w, B. 

Chhagar, Orissa, B. 

Chhai, par, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Chhaibhang, btel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Chhaichal Tan, A, Chittagong Hill Tracts dis^ B. 

Chhajlct, Moradabad dis, N. W, P. 

Chhalai, beel, Rajshahye dts, B. 

Chhaliar, Rewakanta, Gujarat, Bo, P. 

Chhangiri, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Chhanua, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Chhapar, Bickaneerj. R. A. 

Chhapara, Seoni dis, C. P. 

Chhapihera, par, Narsinghgarh s. C. I. A. 

Chhapiya. BasU dis, N. W. P. 

Chhappauka Pahar, h, Jodhpore j. R. A. 

Chhapraghat, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Chharara, par, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Chhatak, Sylhet dis, A. 

Chhatarpur, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B, 

Chhatarpur, s, Bundelkhand C. I. A. 

Chhater, «. Chhindwara dis, C. P. 

Chhatna, /. and s, d, Bankoora dis, B. 

Chhatni, h. Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Chhatraganj, Midnapore dis, B. 

Chhatrasal, Goalpara dis, A. 

Chhattisgarh, Eastern Division, C. P. 

Chhatua, Chumpanin dis, Behar, B. 

Chhayani, A. 

Chhaygaon, Kamrup dis, A. 

Chhedra, Cuttack du, Orissa, B. 

Chhegaon-Makhan, Nimar dis, C. P. 

Chhen Naia Tan, L Chittagong Hill Tracts du, B. 

Chhibu, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Chhibramau, Farukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Chhichgarh, «. Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Chhihiia Khal, kkal, NoakhoUy dis, B. 

Chhindabaju, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Chhindwara, cap, and dis, C. P. 

Chhindwara (Chota), Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

Chhipaner, Bhopal s. C. I. A. 

Chhirana, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Chhobakuri, beiL Rajshahye disy B. 

Chhoiya r, N. W. P, 

Chhola, m, Darjeeling dis, B. 

Chhonda, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Chhota Barkhera, s^C, I. A. 

Chhota-Kaniiala, Sonthal Pergunnahs </f>, Behar B. 

Chhota Sinchula, k, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Chhota Siria, fi, Gwalior s, C, I. A. 

Chhoti Kali Sind, r. C. I. A. 

Chhoti Kanwas, Tonk s, R. A. 

Chhoti Nadi, r. Tonk s. R. A. 

Chhoti Sadri, Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Chhuikhadan, /. s, Raipur</i>, C. P. 

Chhuri, s. Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Chibota, r. Sunth s. Bo. P. 

Chicacole, tai, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Chichali, m, P. 

Chichavratni, Montgomery </«, P. 

Chichgurh, s. Bhandara </tJ, C. P. 

ChichTi, Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

Chicholi, Raipur </w, C. P. 

Chicholi, Betul dh, C. P. 

Chiehondi, Ahmednagar, dis^ Ba P. 



o. 

Chidamburam, /. and sh. South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Chihari, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Chikalda, san, kllichpur dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Chikalda, par, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Chikandi, Furreedpore dis^ B. 

Chikati, <. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Chikballapur, Kolar dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Chikhalgaon, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Chikhalwohol, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Chikhli, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Chikhli, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Chikhli, Mewas s, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Chikhli, tal. Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Chikhli, z, Bhandara du, C. P. 

Chikkansi, Dharwar dis, Bo. P. 

Chikkerur, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Chikraagalur, Kadur dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Chikmong, k, A. 

Chiknai, h, A. 

Chik Nandihalligudd, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Chiknayakanhalu, Tumkur dis^ Mysore s, M. P. 

Chiko, r, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Chikoni, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Chikori, /a/, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Chiksana, Bhurtpore s, R. A. 

Chilakalurpet, Kistna disy M. P. 

Chilambaram, /«/, South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Chilka, /. Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Chilkana, Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Chilkia, Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Chillapar, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Chilla Tara, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Chillianwalla, b.f, Gujrat dis, P. 

ChiUiya, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Chilmari, Rungpore dis, B. 

Chilo, r. Shikarpur dis. Bo. P. 

Chimamalaipur, h, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Chimna Bawari, sk, Tonk s, R. A. 

Chimur, Chanda dis, C. P. 

China, ^/. Rajshahye </», B. 

Chinamandem, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Chinaso, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Chinch, Banswara s, R. A. 

Chinchli, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Chinchligarad, Dang s, Khsmdesh dis. Bo. P. 

Chinchpur, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Chinchwad, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Chingchingpara, A. 

Chingleput, cap, and dis, M. P. 

Chingrihatta, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Chinhut, Lucknow dis, Oudh N. W. P. 

Chini, /. and r, Bashahr s, P. 

Chiniot, Jhang dis, P. 

Chinidanga, Ucl, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Chiniot, Jhang dis, P. 

Chinna Ganjam, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Chinna Hugri, r. Bellaiy dis, M. P. 

Chinna Kimedi, t. Ganjam dis^ M. P. 

Chinnammanur, Madura dis, M. P. 

Chinnammapet, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Chinna Salem, South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Chinsurah, Hooghly dis, B. 

Chintalapati, s. Kistna dis, M. P. 

Chintalapudi, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Chintadrapet sub, Madras dis, M. P. 

Chintalnar, s. Bastar s, C. P. 



Digitized by 



Google 



( XXV ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



o. 

Chintaman, Dinagepore dis^ B. 

Chintamani, Kolar diSf Mysore s. M. P. 

Chintpumi, h, Hoshiarpur dis, P. 

Chiplun, taiy Ratnagiri dis^ Bo. P. 

Chipurupalle, Yizagapatam disy M. P. 

Chiraian, r. Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Chirakal, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Chirakot, Azamgarh dis^ N. W. P. 

Chirala, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Chirand, par^ Sarun dis^ Behar, B. 

Chirang, doar^ Goalpara dis^ A. 

Chirat, san, Peshawar dis^ P. 

Chirawa, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Chirela, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Chiigaon, Jhansi dis^ N. W. P. 

Chiri, r. Cachar disy A. 

China Kot, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Chirkanwan, par^ Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Chirkunda, Manbhoom, </iV, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Chimer, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Chirtanoor, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Chitaldroog, h, and dis^ Mysore s, M. P, 

Chitalmari, y«wV, Jessore disy B. 

Chitalwana, Jodhpore X. R. A. 

Chitang, r. P. 

Chitarkot, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Chitartala, r. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Chitorgarh,^. Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Chitpat, suby Madras, M. P. 

Chitpore, 24 Pergunnahs disy B. 

Chitra, r. Jessore disy B. 

Chitra, r. Bellary disy M. P. 

Chitrakot, Banda diSy N. W. P. 

Chitrasenpur, Howrah <///, B. 

Chitravati, r. Bellary diSy M. P. 

Chitr Kot, diSy Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Chitrod, Cutch s. Bo. P, 

Chitrotpala, u Cuttack diSy Orissa, B. 

Chittagong, capy and disy B. 

Chittagong Hill Tracts, diSy ahd s. d, B, 

Chittapa Rar, h, Rawalpindi disy P. 

Chittar, r. Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Chittavatsa. Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Chitter, r, Cuddapah disy M. P. 

Chittur, Cochin s, M. P. 

Chittoor, North Axcoidisy M. P. 

Chitulia, /ar, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Chitvel, Cuddapah diSy M. P. 

Chitwadi, Bellary disy M. P. 

Chitwail, Cuddapah ^«j, M. P. 

Chitwalasa, Vizagapatam diSy M. P. 

Chobari, s, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Chochak, Montgomery diSy P. 

Chodavaram, Vizagapatam diSy M. P. 

Chogdah, Nuddea disy B. 

Choi, Rawalpindi diSy P. 

Choila, Ahmedabad diSy Bo. P, 

Chok, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Chokampati, Tinnevelly diSy M. P. 

Chola, Bulandshahr disy N. W. P. 

Choladi, ^.to, or/. Malabar ^i>, M. P. 

Cholapur, Benares disy N. W. P. 

Chondibari, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Chopa, Hooghly diSy B. 

Chooadangah, j. d, Nuddea diSy B. 

Chopra, /. and /a/, Khandesh diSy Bo. P. 



Chor, r. Thar and Parkar diSy Sind, Bo. P. 

Chorangla, z. Sankhera Mewas, Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

Chorasi, /. and /a/, Surat disy Bo. P. 

Choreya, Lohardugga disy Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Choriwad, Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Chorla; Belgaum diSy Bo. P, 

Chorlo, r. Karachi diSy Sind, Bo. P. 

Chorparan, Hazaribagh disy Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Chorwarodra, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Chota Chhindwara, Narsinghpur disy C. P. 

Chota Fenny, r. Noakholly diSy B. 

Chota Mirzapur, Mirzapur disy N. \V. P. 

Chota Nagpore, dtVy 2cni\pr. B. 

Chota Simla, Simla diSy P. 

Chota Udepur, cap, and s. Bo. P. 

Choti, Dera Ghazi Khan diSy P. 

Chotila, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Chotila, k. Sirohee s, R. A. 

Chotkhand, Burdwan disy B. 

Chowghat, Malabar diSy M. P. 

Chowk, Lucknow diSy Oudh, N. W. P. 

Choya Saidan Shah, Jhelum diSy P. 

Chuchana, s. Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Chuhar, Rawalpindi disy P. 

Chuharkana, Gujranwala diSy P. 

Chulala, s, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Chulhan, r. Bhandara^ij, C. P. 

Chumalari, m, Sikkim, s. B. 

Chumian, Lahore diSy P. 

Chumparun, capy diSy and s. d. Behar, B. 

Chunakhali, beely Maldah disy Behar, B, 

Chunampet, Chingleput diSy M. P. 

Chunar, or Chandalgarh, //. and canfy Mirzapur 

disy N. W. P. 
Chunchangiri, Hassan disy Mysore s. M. P. 
Chunchankatte, Mysore diSy Mysore s. M. P. 
Chund, Jhang diSy P. 
Chunda, Dera Ismail Khan disy P. 
Chundi, 2. Kistna dtSy M. P. 
Chundi, 2. Nelloreo'/j, M. P. 
Chung, Lahore diSy P. 
Chum Machli Bhareli, Umballa diSy P. 
Chunian, Lahore diSy P. 
Chupra, cap. Sarun diSy Behar, B. 
Chura, Bickaneer j. R. A. 
Chura, /. and /a/, Jhalawad disy Kattywar, Gujarat, 

Bo. P. 
Churabhandar, par, Jalpaiguri disy B, 
Churaman, Dinagepore, disy B. 
Churaman, poriy Balasore disy Orissa, B. 
Churara, Jhansi disy N. W. P. 
Churesar, 2. Sankhera Mewas, Rewakanta, Bo. P. 
Chum, Bickaneer s. R. A. 
Churu, Jeypore s, R. A. 
Churwari, Baghelkhand, Rewah s. C. L A. 
Chutia,/«V, Lohardugga rf/'j, Chota Nagpore, B. 
Chybassa, capy Singhbhoom diSy Chota Nagpore, B. 
Cinamara, Sibsagar diSy A. 
Circars (Northern), t.c, M. P. 
Closepet, Bangalore disy Mysore j. M. P. 
Cocanada, Godavari diSy M. P. 
Cochin, capy and s. Malabar diSy M. P. 
Codur, Kistna diSy M. P. 
Coimbatore, capy and dis M. P. 
Colaba, diSy Bo. P. 
Colachel, Travancore s. M. P. ^^^ j 

Digitized I^VjOOQIC 



( XXVI ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



o. 

Colar Road Station, Mysore eUs^ Mysore i. M. P. 

Colepet, Coorg, M. P. 

Coleroon, r. Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 

ColgoDg, par, Bbagalpur dis^ Behar, B. 

Collegal, Utly Coimbatore dis^ M. P. 

Colonelganj, Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Colonelganj, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Combaconum, ial, Tanjore disy M. P. 

ComercoUy, Nuddea dts, B. 

Comillah, cap^ and j. d, Tipperah dis, B. 

Conjeeveram, Chingleput dis^ M. P. 

Contai, /. and s,d. Midnapore disy B. 

Cooch Behar, s. B. 

Coomla, South Canara dis^ M. P. 

Coompta, ial, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Coondapoor, s, Canara dis^ M. P. 

Coonoor, cant^ Nilgiri dis^ M. P. 

Coorg, pr. M. P. 

Coorla, Thana dis. Bo. P. 



o. 

Coringa, Godavari dis, M. P. 
Coromandel, South Eastern Coast, M. P. 
Cortelliar, r. Chingleput dis^ M. P. 
Cossim Bazar, Moorshedabad dis^ B. 
Cossipore, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 
Cottajram, Travancore s. M. P. 
Courtallam, r. Tinnevelly disy M. P. 
Cox's Bazar, /. and s,d. Chittagong dis, B. 
Cuddakwe, /a/, South Arcot dis^ M, P. 
Cuddapah, lap, and dis, M. P. 
Culliandroog, Bellary dts, M. P. 
Culna, /. and s.d. Burdwan dis, B. 
Cumbam, Madura dt's, M. P. 
Cumbum, ta/, Kumool dis, M. P. 
Cutch, /. Bo. P. 

Cuttack, cap, and dis, Orissa, B. 
Cuttackhaweli, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Cutwa, /. and s,d, Burdwan dis, B. 



D. 

Dabha, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Dabha, s. Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Dabhela, par, Palanpur s, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Dabhoi, Baroda s. Bo. P. 

Dabhol, Ratnagiri dis, Bo. P. 

Dabhora, s. Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Dabka, Nowgong dis, A. 

Dabling, Bashahr s, P. 

Dabo, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P, 

Daboi, Baroda s. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Dabra, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Dabri, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dabwali, Sirsa dis, P. 

Dabwara, Jubbulpore dis, C.P. 

Dacca, cap, dis, and div, B. 

Dachepalle, KisXna. dis, M. P. 

Dadah, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dadar, par, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Dadhalya, z, Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Dadhwa Manpur, Banda t/if, N. W. P. 

Dadon, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Dadpur, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Dadrewa, Bickaneer j. R. A. 

Dadri, Jind s, P. 

Dadri, par, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Dadri, r. P. 

Dadu, tat, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dadua, k, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Dadupur, Umballa, dis, P. 

Dadur, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Daera Dinpanah, Muzaffargarh dis, P. 

Daflapur, s. Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Dag, par, Jhalawar s. R. A. 

D^a, r. Bassein dis, B. B. 

JDagmara, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Dagru, Ferozepore dis, P. 

Dagshai, cant, and san, Simla dis, P. 

Dagyaing, r. Amherst dis, B. B. 

Daha, Meerut dis, N.W. P. 

Dahanu, ta/, Thana, dis, Bo. P. 

Dahapara, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Dahar, r. Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Dahaura, r. Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 



D. 

Dahawar, r, Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Dahi, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Dahihanda, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Dahiphal, Ahmednagar i/i>. Bo. P. 

Dahisar, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Dahiwali, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Dahiwari, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Dahrwah, r. Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Daiang, r. Naga Hills dis, A. 

Daidarai, Thonkwa dis, B. B. 

Daingboon, Kyoukhpyoo dis, B. B. 

Dainhat, Burdwan dis, B. 

Dainhati, Burdwan dis, B. 

Daipai, Henzada^tr, B. B. 

Dajal, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Dakatia, dee/, Jessore dis, B. 

Dakatia, r. Tipperah Vi>, B. 

Dakatianadi, r. Noakholly dis, B. 

Dakha, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Dakhan, Shikarpur </f>, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dakhner, par, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Dakor, Kaira dis, Bo. P. 

Dakshapalle, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Dakshinpat, A. 

Dala, cr. Thonkwa dis, B. B. 

Dala, sud, Rangoon, B. B. 

Dalangiri, A. 

Dalanwon, r. Shwegyeng dis, B. B. 

Daldala, Basli dis, N. W. P. 

Dalgoma, Goalpara dis, A. 

Dalhousie, cant, and san, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Dalijoda, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Dalilnagar, par, Etawah dis, N. W. P. 

Dalipnagar, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Dalli, z, Bhandara^iJ, C. P. 

Dalma, A, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Dalmau, par, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Dalmau, Unao dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Dalmi, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Dalmohat, Hazara dis, P. 

Dalsingh Sarai, Durbhanga dis, Behar, B. 

Dalthoban, /. C. I. A. 

Daltonganj, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagport, 1. 



Digitized by VJi^^V IC 



( xxvii ) 
Alphabetical Index, 



D. 

Dalu, r. Chittagong dis, B. 

Dalwal, Jhelum dis, P. 

Damalcherri, /. North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Damalgri, A. 

Daman, or the Border Lc, P. 

Daman, Portuguese ier, Thana dis^ Bo. P. 

Damana, h, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Damanganga, r. Surat disj Bo. P. 

Daman-i-Koh, par, Sonthal Pergunnahs disy Behar, B. 

Damarganw, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Damarkhanda, par, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Dambal, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Damdah, Raipur dis, C. P. 

Damdaha, Purneah dis, Behar, B. 

Dam Dim, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Damoh, cap, and dis, C. P. 

Damoodur r. Burdwan and Hazaribagh dis, B. 

Dampara, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Damras, Jalaun disy N. W. P. 

Damsang, Daneeling dis, B. 

Damuckdia, Nuddea</i>, B. 

Damulcheruva, North Arcot, dis, M. P. 

Damurhuda, Nuddea dis, B. 

Dananggiri, A. 

Danbar, m, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dandavati, r. Mysore s. M. P. 

Dandi, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Dandoba Dongar, Sangli s. Bo. P. 

Dandoung, Thayetniyo dis, B. B. 

Dangahat, Rungpore </f>, B. 

Dangapara, Rajshahye ^<>, B. 

DangB, t,c. Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Dangsi, par, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Dangri, Lakhimpur dis, A. 

Dangurli, z, Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Dankar, Kangra dis, P. 

Dankaur, /. and par, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Dankia, h. Daijeeling dis, B. 

Dan pur, Cuttack dis, Oiissa, B. 

Danpur, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Danra, h. Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Danra Sakhwara, par, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Danta, s, Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Danta Ramgarh, dis, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Dantan par, and s, d, Midnapore dis, B. 

Dantara, par, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Danthal, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Dantivra, r. Thana dis,'BQ, P. 

Dantiwara, par, Palanpur s. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Dantiwara, Bastar s, C. P. 

Danuban, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Danwar, par, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Danwon, cr, Thonkwa iUs, B. B. 

Daokobau r. Bogra dis, B. 

Daphla, h, Darrang dis, A. 

Daphro, m, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dapoli, /. and tal, Ratnagiri dis, bo. P. 

Dapunia, Pubna dis, B. 

Dapyoo Khyaing, Kyoukhpyoo dis, B. B. 

Daraban, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Darada,/ar, Balasore^iJ, Orissa, B. 

Daracanj, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Darakka, Bannu dis, P. 

Darampuri, Salem dis, M. P. 

Daranagar, AUahahad dis, N. W. P. 

Daranagar, par^ Bijnor dis^ N. W. P. 



Darapur, Ferozepore dis, P. 

Darapuram, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Daratana, r, Jessore dis, B. 

Darauli, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Daray^ Amherst dis, B. B. 

Daraybhyoo, cr, Bassein dis, B. B. 

Daraybouk, Bassein dis, B. B. 

Darbeji, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Darbelo, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Darbi, Sirsa dis, P. 

Dardha, r. Gya, dis, Behar, B. 

Darela, r, and ca, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dargahigil, Lahore dis, P, 

Darhial, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 

Dariabad, Bara Banki dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Dariapur, Ellichpur dis, Berar H. A. D. 

Darien, Amherst dis, B. B. 

Darika, r. A. 

Darin Mauleshwar, par, Sonthal Peiguiuaht di$^ 

Behar, B. 
Darisi, Nellore dis, M. P. 
Daijeeling, cap, cant, san, and dis^ B. 
Darkuti, s, P. 
Darman, Gurdaspur dis, P. 
Darmapatam, t . Malabar dis, M. P. 
Dama, r. Nasik dis. Bo. P. 
Daro, Hyderabad cUs, Sind, Bo. P. 
Daroani, Rungpore disy B. 
Daipan, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Danra Bain, Bannu dis, P. 
Darra Pezu, Bannu dis, P. 
Darra Tane, Bannu, dis, P. 
Darrang, dis, A. 
Darrangiri, Goalpara dis, A. 
Dars, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Darsani, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 
Darsenda, par, Banda dis, N. W. P. 
Darsi, par, Nellore dis, M. P. 
Darwani, Rungpore dis, B. 
Darwha, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 
Daryabad,^r, Bara Banki dis, Oudh, N. W. P, 
Daryakhen, Bhopal s, C. I. A. 
Daryapur, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. x 

Daryapur, Ellichpur dis, Berar, H. A. D. 
Daryapur, Patna dis, Berar, B. 
Dasai, C. I. A. 

Dasankopp, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 
Dasankopp, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 
Dasara, jhallawad dis, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 
Dasasamedh,/./. Benares aSj, N. W. P. 
Dasghara, Hooghly dis, B. 
Dashmalan, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 
Dasisanath, /./. andySif'r, Shahabad dis, Behar, B 
Daska, /. and s,d. Sialkot dis, P. 
Daskrohi, /. and ial, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 
Dasna, par, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 
Dasoli, par, Garhwal dis, N. W. P. 
Daspala, Ls, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Daspur, Midnapur dis, B. 
Dasuya, Hoshiarpur dis, P. 
Data Bandichhor, p,f, C. I. A. 
Dataganj, Budaun dts, N. W. P. 
Datala, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 
Datana, Western Malwa, C. I. A. 
Datauli, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 
Dategarh, Satara dis, Bo. P. 



Digitized by 



Google 



( xxviii ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



D. 

Date-ji-kur, r. Shikarpur (its, Sind, Bo. P. 

Datha, Undsarviya dis^ Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Datia, s. Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Datior, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Datma, Goalpara dis^ A. 

Dattapukur, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Dattaw, r. B. B. 

Dattigaon, C, I. A. 

Datwara, Barwani, s, C. I. A. 

Daudkandi, Tipperah dis, B. 

Daudnagar, Gya dis^ Behar, B. 

Daudzai, Peshawar dis^ P. 

Daula, Meenit dis, N. W. P. 

Daulata, Chumpanin dis^ Behar, B. 

Daulatabad, Hyderabad dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Daulatabad, Moorshedabad dis^ B. 

Daulatganj, Nuddea disy B. 

Daulatkhan, Backergunge dis^ B. 

Daulatpur, Jessore dis, B. 

Daulatpur, Nuddea dis^ B. 

Daulat Nagar, Gujarat rfij, P. 

Daulatpur, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Daulatpur, Nuddea dis^ B. 

Daulatwala, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Daunat, m. Amherst dis, B. B. 

Daundia Khera, /ar, Unao dis^ Oudh, N. W. P. 

Dau, m. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P: 

Daur, r. Patna dis^ Behar, B. 

Daurala, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Dauri, Poona dis^ Bo. P. 

Daus, r. Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Dausa, h, Jeyix)re s, R. A. 

Davangere, Chitaldroog dis^ Mysore j. M. P. 

David, Fort St., South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Dawa, Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Dawad, z. Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Dawer, Ajmere dis^ R. A. 

Dawlan, Amherst dis, B. B. 

Daya, r. Pooree dis, Orissa, B, 

Deb, r, C. I. A. 

Debagram, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Debai, Bulandshahr dts, N. W. P. 

Debar, /, Oodeypore s, R. A, 

Debarua, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Debhat, fair^ 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Debhatta, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Debiganj, Rungpore disy B. 

Debi Patan, Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P, 

Debipur, Burdwan dis^ B. 

Debipur, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Debra, Midnapore dis^ B. 

Deccan, /. c. Southern India. 

Dedgaon, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Dedhrota, z, Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Dedyari, /. Thar and Paikar </«>, Sind, Bo. P. 

Deeg, Bhurtpore s. R. A. 

Deesa, cant^ Palanpur x. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Degam, Baroda s. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

D^am, Broach dis. Bo. P. 

Degam, Jhallawad dis, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Degan, par^ Cuttack dis^ Onssa, B. 

Degh, r, P. 

Deganga, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Degupudi, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Dehat Amanat, par, Benares dis^ N. W. P. 

Dehej, Broach dis^ Bo. P. 



D. 

Deher, par, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Dehlon, Ludhiana dis^ P. 

Dehra Dun rani, cap, and dis^ N. W. P. 

Dehree, Shahabad dis^ Behar B. 

Dehri, C. I. A. 

Dehuwa, r. Shahabad and Sarun dis^ Behar, B. 

Delan, Pooree dis^ Orissa, B. 

Delhi, cap, eant, dis, and div, P. 

Deluti, Jessore dis, B. 

Demagri, s.d. Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Demagri Tan, Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B, 

Denan, ca. Midnapore dis, B. 

Denand, Hissar dts, P. 

Dend, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Uengro, r. Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Denkanikota, Salem disy M. P. 

Denwa, r, and/.r. Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Deo, faif, Gysidis, Behar, B. 

Deo, r. Balaghat dis, C. P. 

Deoban, Dehra Dun dis, N. W. P. 

Deoband, /. and s.d. Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Deoda, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Deodangar, A. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Deodar, s. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Deodha, Gya dis, Behar B. 

Deogad, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Deogaon, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Deogaon, /. and s. d. Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Deogarh, /. Partabgarh s. R. A. 

Deogarh, Oodeypore s. R. A. 

Deogarh, A. Baria s. Rewakanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Deogarh, Gwalior j. C. I. A^ 

Deogarh, /. and /«/, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Deogarh, /. and f,r. Chhindwara dis, C. P. 

Deogarh Khari, r. Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Deogeri, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Deoghur s.d. Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Deoguraria, /./. Indore s. C. I. A. 

Deojhiri, /./. C. I. A. 

Deokuli, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Deokund, /./. Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Deola, p.p. C. I. A. 

Deolali, canf, 'Sasikdis, Bo. P, 

Deolapar, Seoni, dis, C. P. 

Deoli, canf, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Deoli, Wardha dis, C. P. 

Deolia, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Deolia, Partabgarh s. R. A. 

Deolia, z. Sankhera Mewas, Rewakanta, Bo. P» 

Dconadi, r, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Deonal, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Deonali, ft. North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Deonthal, Simla dis, P. 

Deopani, r. Nowgong dis, A. 

Deoprayag, /./. Garhwal dis, N. W. P. 

Deopur, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Deora, Furreedpore dis, B, 

Deora, Bashahr, s. P. 

Deoraj, Chumparum dis, Orissa, B. 

Deorajnagar, Ba^helkhand, C. I. A. 

Deoraniya, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Deorhi, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Deorhi Champanagar, Pumeah dis, Behar B, 

Deori, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B, 

Deori, par, Bhopal s. C. I. A. 

Deori, Saugor dis, C. P, 



Digitized by 



Google 



( xxix ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



D. 

Deori, 2. Raipur dts^ -C. P. 

Deoria, /. and s,d. Gorakhpur i/is, N. W. P. 

Deonikh, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Deosar, Jeypore, s, R. A. 

Deotan, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Deothan, Ahmednagar dis, Bo. P. 

Deoti, /. Ulwur s. R. A. 

Deotigarh, m, Naga Hills dis, A. 

Depal, Midnapore dis, B. 

Depalpur, In'lore s. C. I. A. 

Deparja, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Deraband, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Derabisi, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Dera Din Fana, Mooltan dis, P. 

Dera Fatah Khan, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Dera Ghazi Khan, cap, and dis, P. 

Dera Gopipur, Kangra, dis, P. 

Dera Ismail Khan, cap, and dis, P. 

Deraichandpur, Sylhet dts, A. 

Derajat, d.c. and div, P. 

Dera Nawab Sahib, Bahawalpur s, P. 

Dera Nanak, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Derapur, par, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Derbhauti, Dang s, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Deri Shahan, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Derol, t. Mahikanta, Gujarat Bo. P. 

Dero Mohbat, ta/, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Desan, z. Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Deshnok, Bickaneer x. R. A. 

Deshnur Gad, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Desui, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Desur, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Desuri, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Detanaw, Hanthawaddy dis, B. B. 

Detroj, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Deulgaon Raja, p.p. Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Deulghat, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Deuli, h. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Devabhumi, s. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Devakota, Madura dis, M. P. 

Devala, Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Devanhalli,/ar,and/./. Bangalore/^V, Mysore sM. P. 

Devaprayag, Garhwal, dis, N. W. P. 

Devarakot z, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Devarayapalle, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Devaraydurga, /./. Tumkur dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Devi, r. Cuttack dis,, Orissa, B. 

Devikota, Madura dis, M. P. 

Devikotta, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Devimana, Kanara, dis, Bo. P. 

Devimana, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Devinadi, r. Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Devipatam, Madura dis, M . P. 

Devipura, Bhopal s, C. I. A. 

Devipura, hahoiedis, P. 

Devisagar, /. C. I. A. 

Deyjagaon, I/, hottse Broach cUs, Bo. P. 

Dewa,/ar, Bara Banki dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Dewal, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Dewala, Chanda (Us, C. P. 

Dewalgaon, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Dewalmari, h. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Dewalwara, Wardha cUs, C. P. 

Dewar Hubli, Dharwar dis^ Bo. P. 

Dewas, s. C. I. A. 

Dhaba, Betul disy C. P. 



D. 

Dhabah, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Dhabalgiri, h. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Dhabien, cr. Hanthawaddy <//;, B. B. 

Dhabla Dhir, Bhopal s. C. I. A. 

Dhabia Ghosi, Bhopal j. C. I. A. 

Dhadhar, r. Broach dis. Bo. P. 

Dhagnyawaddy, Toungngoo dis, B, B. 

Dhagya Dongar, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Dhaigaon, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Dhak, Bannu dis, P. 

Dhaka, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Dhaka, Muzzaffargarh dis, P. 

Dhaka Dakshin, A. 

Dhakia, Shahjahanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Dhakka, Afghanistan, 

Dhakuakhana, Lakhimpur dis, A. 

Dhakuria 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Dhal, r. A. 

Dhalandhar, 24-Pergunnahs, dis, B. 

Dhaleswari, r. Cachar dis, A. 

Dhalet, Khyoukhpyoo </w, B. B. 

Dhalkishor, r. Burdwan dis, B. 

Dhalli, h. Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Dhalpur, A. 

Dham, r. Wardha dis, C. P. 

Dhama, Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Dhamaliya, r. A. 

Dhamangaon, Ellichpur dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Dhamapur, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Dhamar, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Dhamash, Burdwan dis, B. 

Dhambhee, Henzada dis, B. B. 

Dhamda, Raipur dis, C. P. 

Dhamdaha, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Dhami, r. and s. P. 

Dhamin, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Dhamna, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Dhamnagar, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Dhamnagar, par, Balasore dis, Orrissa, B. 

Dhammar, Indore s. C. I. A. 

Dhammatha, Amherst dis, B. B. 

Dhamnod, Dhar s. C. I. A. 

Dhamoni, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Dhamotar, /. Partabgarh s, R. A. 

Dhamour, Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Dhampur, par, Bijnor dis, N. W. P. 

Dhamra, r. and port, Balasore, dis, Orissa, B. 

Dhamrai, Dacca dis, B. 

Dhamsia, «. Sankhera Mewas, Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

Dhamtari, /. and s.d, Raipur dis, C. P. 

Dhamtaur, Hazara dis, P. 

Dhana Dungar, f.p. Jeypore s. R. A. 

Dhanaj, Amraoti dis, H. A. D. 

Dhanal, «. Mahikanta, Bo. P. 

Dhanapur, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 

Dhanari, Budaun dis, N. W. P. 

Dhanaura, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 

Dhanawas, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Dhandarphal, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Dhandhar, par, Palanpur s. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Dhandhi, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dhandhuka, tal, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Dhandia, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Dhandwadh, Upper Sind Frontier, dis. Bo. P. 

Dhanela, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Dhanera, par, Palanpur x. Gujarat, Bo. P. 



Digitized by ^ 



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( XXX ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



Dhaneru, Bickanecr s. R. A. 

Dhaneswari, r. Nowgong diSf A. 

Dhangain, Shahabad </i>, Behar, B. 

Dhangain /. Hazaribagh dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Dhanganga r. H. A. D. 

Dhan^on, C. I. A. 

Dhani, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Dhanikhola, Mymensingh dis^ B. 

Dhankora, Dacca dis, B. 

Dhanora, s. Chanda dis^ C. P. 

Dhanori, Wardha dis^ C. P. 

Dhanpur, Ghazipur dis, N, W. P. 

Dhansiri, r. Naga Hills and Sibsagar dis^ A. 

Dhansura, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Dhantauri, Umballa dis, P. 

Dhanu, r. Sylhet dis, A. 

Dhanua, r. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Dhanur, /. Sirsa dis, P. 

Dhanubhkhodi, Madura </fj, M. P. 

Dhanwar, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Dhanwar, Khandesh d^i j, Bo. P. 

Dhaoaldhar, w. Kangra dis, P. 

Dhflora Ganjara, Inuore s. C. I. A. 

Dhapa, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Dhapcwara, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Dhar, Buldana dts, Berar, H. A. D. 

Dhar, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Dhar, s. C. I. A. 

Dharakot, «. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Dharampassa, Sylhet dis, A. 

Dharampur, s. Sural dis. Bo. P. 

Dharampur, par, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Dharampura, Bhurtpore s. R. A. 

Dharam Rai, C. I. A. 

Dharamtar, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Dharamtul, Nowgong, dis, A. 

Dharan, Karachi dis, Sind Bo. P. 

Dharangaon, Khandesh dts. Bo. P. 

Dharanikotta, sh, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Dharapuram, /. and tai, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Dharaseo, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dharaur, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Dhareshwar, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Dhareshwar, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Dharema, Shahpur dis, P. 

Dharfari, Mozunerp>ore dis, Behar, B. 

Dhargaon, Hazareebagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Dhareaon, par, Indore s. C. I. A. 

Dhan, s.Pandu Mewas, Rewakanta, Gujarat. Bo. P. 

Dhari, Gohelwad dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Dharia, Bhagiilpur dis, Behar B. 

Dharhara, par, Mongh3rr dis, Behar, B. 

Dharlla, r. Cooch Behar s. B. 

Dharma t,c. Kumaon dis, N. W. P. 

Dharma, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Dharmanpur, par, Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Dharmapuri, /. and tai, Salem dis^ M. P. 

Dharmashala, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Dharmavaram, /. and tai, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Dharmkot, Sialkot dis, P. 

Dharmkot, Amritsar dis^ P. 

Dharmpasa, A. 

Dharmpur, A. 

Dharmpuri, dis, Dhar ^. C. I. A. 

Dharmsala, cant, and san^ Kangra dis, P. 

Dharnagar, p,hj, Palanpur s. Gujarat, Bo. P. 



Dhamaoda, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Dharsoti. r. Bahraich i/ij, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Dharuhera, Guigaon dis^ P. 

Dharwar, dis. Bo. P. 

Dharjraro, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dhasa, Gohelwad dis, Kattjrwar, Bo. P. 

Dhasan, r. Bundelkhand, C I. A. 

Dhata, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Dhatarwari, Haliar dis, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Dhathwaikyouk, r. Prome dis, B. B. 

Dhaulana, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Dhauleshwaram, Godavari dis, M. P, 

Dhaulpura, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Dhauka, r. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Dhaulagiri, m, Nepal s, Himalayas. 

Dhaulana, Meerut dis^ N. W. P. 

Dhaular, Montgomery dis, P. 

Dhaunkal, Gujranwala dis, P. 

Dhaura Hingora, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dhaurahra, tJ, Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Dhaurahra, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Dhauria, A. 

Dhawal, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Dhawan, Gwalior x, C. I. A. 

Dhekha, Chumpanm dis, Behar, B. 

Dhekial A. 

Dhemaji, A. 

Dhenkanal, t,s, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Dherali, Garhwal dis, N. W. P. 

Dheru Gunna, Gujrat dis, P. 

Dhillanwali, Gujranwalla dis, P. 

Dhilwan, Kapurthala x. P. 

Dhima, Radhanpur x. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Dhimra, r. Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Dhin, Umballa dts, P. 

Dhindari, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Dhingwas, par, Partabgarh dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Dhoa, r. Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Dhoba, h, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Dhobaghata, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Dhobakhal, Garo Hills dis, A. 

Dhodar Ali, rocui, Sibsagar dis, A. 

Dhodhan Bagra, par, Mozufiferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Dhodhar, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Dhoj, Delhi dis, P. 

Dhokarpa, Kanara dis. Bo. P. . 

Dhok Mochian, Jhelum dis^ P. 

Dhol, r. Lakhimpur dis, A. 

Dhola, Jodhpore x. R. A. 

Dholagarh, A. Oodeypore x. R. A. 

Dholbaja, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Dholera, /. and cruk, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Dholka, tai, Ahmedabad dis, Ba P. 

Dhol pur, X. R. A. 

Dholsamudra, /. Furreedpore dis, B. 

Dhom, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Dhond, Poona</fx, Bo. P. 

Dhondaicha, Khandesh </tx, Bo. P. 

Dhooma, Seoni dis, C. P. 

Dhopabar, A. 

Dhopeshwar, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Dhor, ChoU Udepur x. Rewakanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Dhoraji, Haliar dts, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P, 

Dhorap, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Dhori, Upper Sind Frontier, dis, Bo. P. 

Dhos, r. DurbhuBga dis, Behar, B. 



Digitized by ^ 



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( xxxi ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



Dhotani, /. Partabgarh s. R. A. 

Dbotra, C. I. A. 

Dhowi. Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Dhrafa, Hallar dis, Kaltywar, Bo. P. 

Dhrangadra, /. and s, Jhalawad dis^ Kaltj'war, Bo. P. 

Dhrol, tal, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Ba P. 

Dhubjuri, Jalpaiguri dis^ B. 

Dhubri, cap, Goalpara diSj A. 

Dhulghat, Ellichpur dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Dhnlia, /. and tci, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Dhulian, Moorshedabad dis^ B. 

Dhulkot, Umballa dis, P. 

Dhuma, Sconi dis, C. P. 

Dhumri, Etah, dis, N. W. P. 

Dhumwad, Dharwar dis^ Bo. P. 

Dhunat, Bogra dis^ B. 

Dhunat, s, a, Rungpore dis, B. 

Dhund, r. Teypore s, R. A. 

Dhundshi, Dharwar, dis. Bo. P. 

Dhuniakhali, Hooghly dis^ B. 

Dhupan, r. Sau^or dis^ C. P. 

Dhupguri, Jalpaiguri dis^ B. 

Dhurheta, Hazaribaeh </«, Chota-Nagpore, B. " 

Dhuria, Bhagalpqr dis, Behar, B. 

Dhuriaghata, beel, Jessore </»>, B. 

Dhuriapar, par^ Gorakhpur dis^ N. W. P. 

Dhurko, h. Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Dhurun^ Chittagong Hill TracU disy B. 

Dhurwai,/ Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Dhus, /ar, Benares dis, N. W. P, 

Dial, Lahore ^{>, P. 

Dialgarh, Umballa dis^ P. 

Diamond Harbour, s,d, &/^/, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Diara Ghiaspur, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Dibai, par, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Dibang, r. A. 

Dibhagiri, h, Kolar dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Dibni, r. Kamrup dis, A. 

Dibru, r. Lakhimpur dis, A. 

Dibrugarh, cant, and s. d, Lakhimpur dis, A. 

Dibva Singhaprasad, Pooree dis, Qrissa, B. 

Dichai, r. A. 

Dichkot, Jhang dis, P. 

Didarganj, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Didwana, Jodhpore x, R. A. 

Didwana, /./. Jeypore s, R. A. 

Dig, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Digalgram, Burdwan dis, B. 

Diganga, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Digaru, r. A. 

Digbijaiganj, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

I^iggi> Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

I>iggi, /./. Jeypore j. R. A. 

Digha, Patna dU, Behar, B. 

Digha, par, Rajshahye dii, B. 

Digha, khal, Rajshahye dis, B. 

I^ighapatiya, Raishahye dis, B. 

Digha Mohana, Midnapore dis, B. 

I>ighi, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Dighri, Hyderal^ad dh, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dighwara, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Dignagar, Burdwan dis, B. 

Digra, Hooghly dis, B. 

Digras, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Digsar, par, Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Digupudi, Gaajam dis, M. P. 



Digwara, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Dihang, r. A. 

Diharakpur, par^ Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Dihing, r. Nowgong dis, A. 

Dihingia Nikri, A. 

Diju, r. Nowgong di^, A. 

Dikhu, r. Sil^agar dis, A. 

Dikrai, r. A. 

Dikrang, r. Lakhimpur </;>, A. 

Diksal, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Dikthan, Gwalior j. C. I. A. 

Dilari, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 

Dilaud, par, Bhopal s. C. I. A. 

Dilawar, ft. Bahawalpur x. P. 

Dilawarpur, par, Purneah dis, Behar, B. 

Dilawarpur, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B, 

Dilbar, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Dildarnagar, Ghazipur <//>, N. W. P. 

Dilkosha, Lucknow dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Dilly, m, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Dil Murad, Upper Sind Frontier dis. Bo. P. 

Dilra, Rewah s. C. L A. 

Diluti, Jessore dis, B. 

Dilwara, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Dilwara, tern, Sirohee s, R. A. 

Dilyar, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Diman, r. Nowgong dis, A. 

Dimapur, Naga- Hills, dis, A. 

Dimla, Rungpore dis, B. 

Dlmruya,/.r. Kamrup dis, A. 

Dimwah, ca, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dina, r. Jubbulpore and Chanda dis, C P. 

Dina, Jhelum dis, P. 

Dinagepore, cap, and dis, B. 

Dinanagar, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Dinapore, cant, and s,d, Patna i/i>, Behar, B. 

Dinara, par, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Dinarpur, Sylhet dis, A. 

Dindamal, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Dindawad, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Dindigul, tcU, Madura dis, M. P. 

Dindori, tal, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Dinga, Gujrat dis, P. 

Dingan, ^a, or r. Thar and Parkar </ix, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dingarh Kiner, Sirmur s, P. 

Dingier, m, Khasi Hills dis, A. 

Dingra, Purneah dis, Behar, B. 

Dingraghat, Purneah dis, Behar, B. 

Dinnata, x. d, Cooch Behar o^. B. 

Dinhata, Rungpore dis, B. 

Dinhatti, san, Nilgiri dis, M. P 

Diodar, Radhanour j. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Diolia, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Dip, Bhopal s, C. L A. 

Dip, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dipalpur, Montgomery dis, P. 

Dipalpur, Indore, s, C. L A. 

Dipla, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dipota, r. A. 

Dirai, A. 

Dirghanagar, Burdwan dis, B. 

Dirju, r. A. 

Disai, r. Nowgong dis, A. 

Disang, r. Sibsagar 4/?>, A. 

Disaun, r. Bhopal x. C. I. A. 

Diu, /. and i, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 



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Google 



( xxxii ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



D. 



Diva, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Diva, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Divi Pt., Kistna dis, M. P. 

Diwala, Chanda dzs, C. P. 

Diwalgaum, Buldana dis^ Berar, H. A. D. 

Diwalghat, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Diwalwara, Wardha dit^ C. P. 

Diwanganj, Mymensingh dis^ B. 

Diwangiri, Kamrup dis^ A. 

Diwanmahalla, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Diyodanga, Ganjam dis^ M. P. 

Doab, d.c. N. W. P. and P. 

Doaba, Peshawar dis^ P. 

Dobaldhan, Rohtak dis, P. 

Dobi, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Dobuiji, Montgomery dis, P. 

Doda, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Dodako, Upper Sind Frontier, dis. Bo. P. 

Dodalata, h. Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Dodballapur, Bangalore dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Doderi, /a/, Chitaldroog ^i x, Mysore s. M. P. 

Dodho, h, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Dodwad, Sangli s. Bo. P. 

Dogachi, Pubna</tV, B. 

Dogra, Lahore dis^ P. 

Dohad, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Dohad, Panch Mahals dis^ Bo. P. 

Doharighat, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Doki, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Dokkalkonda, h, Kolar dis^ Mysore s, M, P, 

Dokoha, Jullundur dis^ P. 

Dolang, r. Midnapore </i>, B. 

Dolapur, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Dolasna, Ahmednagar dis^ Bo. P. 

Dolerara, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Dolhra, Rohtak dis, P. 

Dolsahi, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Doma, Chanda dis^ C. P. 

Domariagani, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Doracl, J. ^lergui dis, B. B. 

Doraeli, Jhelum, dis, P. 

Domjurh, Hooghly dis, B. 

Dommankurchi, «. Salem </ij, M. P. 

Dompara, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Don, r. Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Donabyoo, Thonkhwa dis, B. B. 

Dondri, Gwalior j. C. I. A. 

Dongaon, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Dongara, Lalitpur ^iV, N. W. P. 

Dongargaon, Ahmednagar dis^ Bo. P. 

Dongargaon, Chanda dts, C. P. 

Dongargarh, Raipur dis, C. P. 

Dongargavigudd, Belgaum dis, Bo. P. 

Dongarpur, s. R. A. 

Dongartal, Seoni dis, C. P. 

Donka, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Donnayi, r, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Doonreng, h. Amherst dis, B. B. 

Doonran, cr, Thonkwa dis, B. B. 

Doonthamie, r. Mergui dis, B. B. 

Doonwon, Amherst dis, B. B. 

Doora, Amherst dis, B. B. 

Doorengabho, Prome dis^ B. B. 

Dootiyakhareng, Amherst dis^ B. B. 

Dopdar, A. 

Dora, Rewah s, C. I. A. 



D. 

Doraha, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Doramarg, Sawantwari s. Bo. P. 

Doranda, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Dorangla, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Dor^dda, h. Tumkur dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Doriganj, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Dorishah, Upper Sind Frontier, dit. Bo. P. 

Doro, par, Midnapore dis, B. 

Dosa, ca, or r. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dostpur, Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Double Island, i. and Z/. fumse, Amherst dis, B. B. 

Doungboon, Prome dis, B. B. 

Dounggyee, Henzada dis, B. B. 

Doungmana, Prome dis, B. B. 

Dowlaishweram, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Draksharamam, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Drigri, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Dronagiri, Kolaba^/w, Bo. P. 

Dronagiri, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Drug, /. and s.d, Raipur dis, C. P. 

Drummondganj, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Duabo, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Duar, s,d, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Duar Khaling,/r. Darrang^i>, A. 

Duars, Extern, Goalpara dis, A. 

Duars, Western, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Dub, /. P. 

Dubalhati, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Dubari, Azamgarh, dis, N. VV. P. 

Dubchanchia, Bogra</2>, B. 

Dubera Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Dublana, Boondee s, R. A. 

Dubrajpur, s.d, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Dudakar, h, Oodeypore s. R. A. 

Dudhai, Cutchx. Bo. P. 

Dudhai, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P, 

Dudhani, Kurandwad s. Bo. P. 

Dudhara, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Dudhganga, r, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Dudhi, par, Mirzapur dis, N, W. P. 

Dudhi, r. Chhindwara dis, C. P. 

Dudhia, Baria s, Rewakanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Dudhmala, «. Chanda dts, C. P. 

Dudhnai, r. Garo Hills and Goalpara dis, A. 

Dudhnath, A. A. 

Dudhpur, «. Sankhera Mewas, Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

Dudpatli, Cachar dis. A, 

Dudu, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Dudua, r. Jalpaiguri dis, B, 

Duduya, r. Jalpaiguri diSy B. 

Dugarazpatnam, port, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Dugari, Tonk j. R. A. 

Duggoralla, Kistna dis, M. P, 

Dugni. par, Singhbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Duhalia, h. Sylhet dis, A. 

Duhia, k. Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Duhosaho, Chumparan dis, Behar, B. 

Dujah, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dujana, s. P. 

Dukario, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Dukhin Shabazpore, s.d, Backeigunge dis, B. 

Dulai, Pubna dis, B. 

Dulete, Bhopal s, C. I. A. 

Dulalgunj, Pumeah dis, Behar B. 

Dularia, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Dulia Dashgan, haf, Midnapore dis, B. 



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( xxxiii ) 
Alphabetical Index 



Dumagudem, Bhadrachallam, Godavari dis^ M. P. 

Duman, Thelum dis^ P. 

Dumardih, Lohardugga dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Dumarichati, Haziribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Dumarkunda, par, Manbhoom dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B . 

Dumdum, p, Kashmir s. P. 

Dumdum, Lakhimpur dis^ A. 

Dum Dum, cant, and s,d, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Dumka, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Dumkal, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Dumraon, Shahabad dis, Bebar, B. 

Dumri, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Dumurda, Hooghly dis, B. 

Dumuria, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Dumuria, Jessore dis, B. 

Dumuria, Singhbhoom dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Dun, h. Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Dunal, p, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Dundwaraganj, Etah dis, N. W. P. 

Dunera, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Dunga /, and/. Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Dungagali, Hazara dis, P. 

Dungarpur, s, R. A. 

Dungram, Moorshedabad dis^ B. 

Dungri, Surat dis^ Bo. P. 



E. 

Eastern Duars, t,c, Goalpara dis, A. 
Echibul, Kashmir s. P. 
Echrano, h, Jodhpore s, R. A. 
Edalabad, par, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 
Edar, 1. Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 
Eddawana, Malabar dis, M. P. 
Edenwah, r. Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Eklmonstone, 1. 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 
Edwardesabad, cant, Bannu dis, P. 
Edyenkudi, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 
Egatpura, Madras town, M. P. 
Egmore, Madras city, M. P. 
Egra, Midnapore dis, B. 
Eka, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 
Ekala, Chanda, dis, C. P. 
Ekamba, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 
Ekdala, pat, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 
Eklingji, /./. Oodeypore s, R. A. 
Ekma, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 
Ekruk. Sholapur dis. Bo. P. 
Ekteshwar,y&i>, Bankoora^V, B. 
Ekvira, Poona dis. Bo. P. 
Elamanur, Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 
Elamlulai Mallai, m, Malabar dis, M. P. 
Elavanasur, South Arcot dis, M. P. 
Elavarasanavdal, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 
Elengial, A. 

Elephanta, i, and caves Bombay, Bo. P. 
Eliyankudi, Madura dis, M. P. 
Elk Hill, Nilgiri dis, M. P. 
Ellamanchili, Godavari dis, M. P. 
Ellamanchili, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 
Ellarampuni, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 
Ellattur, r. Malabar dis, M. P. 
Ellenabad, Sirsa dis, P. 
Ellichpur, cant, cap, and dis, Berar, H. A. D. 



D. 

Duni, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Dunyapur, Mooltan dis, P. 

Dupara, Gwalior s,C, I. A. 

Duraiha, par, Bhopal s, C. I. A. 

Durbhunga, cap, and dis, Behar, B. 

Durduria, ft, Dacca dis, B. 

Durgapur, Burdwan dis, B. 

Durgapur, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Durgapur, r. Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Durgapur, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Duigapur, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Durgarazapatnam, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Durgauti, Shahabad dis, B. 

Durgawati, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Duijanpur, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 

Durshanigudda, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Duzan, m. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Dwamkadhish, sh, Tonk s, R. A. 

Dwarakanathji, p.p. Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Dwarband /. Cachar dis, A. 

Dwarhatta, Hooghly dis, B. 

Dwarka, /. and^. Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Dwarka, Okhamandal dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Dwarka, r. Beerbhoom and Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Dwarkeshwar, r. Midnapore dis, B. 



E. 

Ellinga, Mjmjensingh dis, B, 
Elliotganj, Tipperah dis, B. 
Ellora, caves, H. 
Ellore, tal, Godavari dis, M. P. 
Ellomad, Malabar ctis, M. P. 
Eminabad, Gujranwala dis, P. 
English Bazar, c,s, Maldah dis, B. 
Engbawngay, Prome dis, B. B. 
Engbhettaw, Thayetmyo dis, B. B. 
Engdaing, Toungngoo dis, B. B. 
Enggabho, Henzada^w, B. B. 
Enggaboo, Thonkwa dis, B. B. 
Enggaloon, Hanthawaddy dis, B. B. 
Enggoon, r. Prome dis, B. B. 
Enggoon, Thayetmyo dis, B. B. 
Enggyee, Prome dis, B. B. 
Enggyeerwabwa Thayetmyo dis, B. B. 
Enggyeng, Kyoukhpyoo dis, B. B. 
Englay, Thayetmyo dis, B. B. 
Engmaonyoma, Prome, dis, B. B. 
Engrai, Bassein, dis, B. B. 
Engraigyee, /. Bassein dis, B. B. 
Engroon, r. Prome dis, B. B. 
Engthanwot, /. Henzada dis, B. B. 
Engtsouk, Tavoy dis, B. B. 
Engwon, /. Toungngoo dis, B. B. 
Engwon, Tavoy dis, B. B. 
Engwongyee, /. Henzada dis, B. B. 
Engzaya, Thonkwa dis, B. B. 
Ennur, Chingleput dis, M. P. 
Enral, beel, Jessore dis, B. 
Enriadaha, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 
Entally, sub, Calcutta, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 
Epurpolliem, Kistna dis, M. P. 
Eran, Saugor dis, C. P. 
Erandgaon, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 



E 

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( XXXIV ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



E. 

Erandol, /a/, Khandesh dis. Bo. P 
Erao, r. Partal^rh s, R. A. 
Erawan, h, Oodeypore s, R. A. 
Erayan, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 
Eri, m. Karachi dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 
Erinpura, c<mt, Sirohee s, R. A. 
Ernad /a/, Malabar diSy M. P. 
Ernakolam, Cochin s, M. P. 
Emial, Travancore s, M. P. 
Erode, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 



E. 



Erragondapalem, Kumool dis^ M. P. 
Ersama, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Eniiiiaipati s. Salem dis, M. P. 
Esarda, Jeypore s, R. A. 
Etah, cap, and dis, N. W. P. 
Etaiyapuram, «. Tinnevelly dis, M, P. 
Etarsi, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 
Etawah, cap, aad dis, N. W. P. 
Ettiyapuram, «. Tinnevelly dftj, M. P. 
Everest, m. Himalayas, Nepal. 



Faiiabad, far, Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Faizpur, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Fakhrabadj^r, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Fakhrpur, par, Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Fakiragaon, A. 

Fakirer Takia,y2if>, 24-Pergaimahs dis, B. 

Fakirganj, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Fakireanj, Goalpara dis, A. 

Fakirhat, Jessore dis, B. 

Falcutta, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Faljur, A. 

False Point, It. lumse and cape, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B, 

Falta, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Faradnagar, Noakholly dis, B. 

Farah, Gwalior j. C. I. A. 

Farah, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Farashganj, Noakholly dis, B. 

Faridabad, Delhi dis, P. 

Faridcanj, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Faridkot, Mooltan dis, P. 

Faridkot, /. P. 

Faridnagar, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Faridpur, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Farmkhabad, cap, and dis, N. W. P. 

Farrukhpur, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Farukhnagar, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Fatahabad, Hissar dis, P. 

Fatahgarh, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Fatahjang, Rawalpmdi dis, P. 

Fatahpur, Delhi m, P. 

Fatahpur, Montgomery dis, P. 

Fatahpur, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Fatahulla, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Fatehabad, Gwalior /. C. I. A. 

Fatehabad, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Fatehabad, Chittagong i/tf, B. 

Fatehganj, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Fatehgarh, cant, Farrukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Fatehgarh, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Fatehgarh, Kerowlee s, R. A. 

Futehgarh, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Fateh^h, Kishengarh x. R. A. 

Fatehiangpur, Rungpore, dis, B. 

Fatehkhedla, Buldana dis, H. A. D. 

Fateh Panjal, h, Kashmir j. P. 

Fatehpur, Rungpore dis, B. 



F. 

Fatehpur, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Fatehpur, cap, and ctis, N# W. P. 

Fatehpur, Gya dis, B^iar, B. 

Fatehpur, /or, Unao dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Fatehpur, Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Fatehpur, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Fatehpur, s.d, Bara Banki dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Fatehpur Sikri/./. Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Fatehpur Singhia, par, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Fatikchera, Chittagong dis, B. 

Fatuha, Patna dis, Behar, 6. 

Fazal-jo-Tando, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Fazilka, Sirsa, dis, P. 

Fadlpur, Dera Ghad Khan dis, P. 

Fadl Shah, Mooltan dis, P. 

Fenchuganj, Sylhet dis, A. 

Feni, Noakholly, dis, B. 

Fenoa, Chittagong </i>, B. 

Fenny, r. Chittagong dis, B. 

Ferangipur, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Ferozepore, cap, cant, and dis, N. W. P. 

Firinghi Bazar, Dacca dis, B. 

Firinghi Pett, South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Firoz, Lahore dis, P. 

Firozabad, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Firozabad, par, Kheri du, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Firozpur, Backergun^e dis, B. 

Firozpur, Gurgaon dts, P. 

Firozpur, topes, Bhopal j. C. I. A. 

Firozshah, b,f, Ferozepore dis, P. 

Fordwah, ca, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Fort Bara, Peshawur dis, P. 

Fort Gamett, Kohat dis, P. 

Fort Gloster Howrah dis, B. 

Fort Saint George, Madras dis, M. P. 

Fort William, y?, Bengal Pres. division, Calcutta, B. 

Foul-Island, t. Sandoway dis, B. B. 

Fraserpet, Coorg, M. P. 

French Rocks, Mysore dis, Mysore /. M. P. 

Fuleli, r. Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo, P. 

Fulihuri, Backergunge dis, B. 

Fulkumar, Rungpore dis, B. 

Furreedpore, cap, dis, and /. d, B. 

Futwah, Patna i/w, Behar, B. 

Fyzabad, cap, cant, and dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 



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Google 



( XXXV ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



Gabat, Ahmedabad dis^ Bo. P. 

Gabbaxu, f. A. 

Gabhaiu Parbat, h, A. 

Gabknnda, Pooree du^ Orissa, B. 

Gachero, Hyderabad disj Sind, Ba ?• 

Gadadhar, r. Jalpa^ri dis^ B. 

Gadadhar, r. Goalpara, dis, A. 

Gadag Betigeri, tal^ Dharwar dis^ Bo. P. 

Gadahsand, par^ Durbhunga dis Behar, B» 

Gadai, r. Rajshahye </t>y B. 

Gadarpur, Tarai du, N. W. P. 

Gadarpur, Kumaon dis N. W. P. 

Gadarwara, s.d, NarsiDghpur dis, C. P. 

Gaddakhel, Kohat dis, P. 

Gadhairi, r. Saogor dii, C. P. 

Gadhra, Gohelwad dii, Kattywar» Bo. P. 

Gadhali bazar, A» 

Gadilam, r. Soath Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Gadinad, hob, Coor^, M.P. 

Gadkball, Tessore dts, B. 

Gadnadi, Sawant Wari x. Bo. P. 

Gadnadi, r. Ratnagiri ^ir, Bo. P. 

Gadpada, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Gadra, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P» 

Gaeghat, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Gaiiirgaon, M3anensingh dis, B. 

Gagan Baura, Kolhapur x. Bo. P. 

Gaggar Majra, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Gagla, Rungpore dis, B. 

Gagra, par, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Gagrami, ft, J[hallawar x. R. A. 

Gagret, Hoshiarpor dis, P. 

Gahmar, Ghazipar dis, N. W. P. 

Gahrauli, /. zjiapar, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Gahri, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Gaibandha, Rungpore dis, B. 

Gaighata, Nuddea dis, B. 

Gaini, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Gaipura, Mirzapor dis, N. W. P. 

Gaisabad, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Gaisal, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Ga|, r. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Gaiapatinaw, Vlzagapatam dis, M. P. 

Gajargota, Rajpipla x. Rewakanta, Gujarat Bo. P. 

Gaiariya, r. A. 

Gajburu, h, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Gajendragad, Kaladgi dis, Bo. P. 

Gajendragad, Mjrsore x. M. P. 

Gajera, Broach dis. Bo. P. 

Gajghanta, Rungnpore dit, B. 

Gainandi, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Gajikhali, r. Dacca dis, B. 

Gajner, Bickaneer x. R. A. 

Gainer, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Gairaula, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 

Gakhirkhoa, A. 

Galadia, h, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Galgali, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Gali^hasia, r. 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Gabakot, Dungarpur x. R. A. 

Gallu, r. Sind, Bo. P. 

Galna, /ar, Nasik dis, Bo. P. 

Galsakhali, Backergunge dis, B. 

Galsi, Burdwan dis^ B. 

Galwa, r, Tonk x. R. A, 

Gambhar, r. P. 



Gambheri, r, Oodeypore x. R. A. 
Gambhir, r. Malwa, C. I. A. 
Gambhiri, r. Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. F. 
Gambhirpur, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 
Gambila, r. Bannu dis, P. 
Gamoonaing, Shwegyeng dis, B. B. 
Gamph, Ahmedabad ^ix. Bo. P. 
Ganakgaon, A* 

Ganapuram, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 
Gandai, s. Raipur dis, C. P. 
Gandak, r. N. W. P. 
Gandaki, r. Sarun dis, Behar, B. 
Gandamanayakanur, s. Madura dis, M. F, 
Ganda Singhwala, Lahore dis, P. 
Gandevi, Baroda x. Gujarat, Bo. P. 
Gandgaih, h, Rawalpindi tHs, P. 
Gandhamadan, h, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B» 
Gandharragad, Belgium dis. Bo. P. 
Gandharvakota, i. Tanjore dis, M. P. 
Gandher, /. Partabgarh x. R. A. 
Gandheshwari, r. Bankoora dis, B. 
Gandhra, Rohtak dis, P. 
Gandiaur, Kohat dis, P. 
Gandikot, h, Cuddapah dis, M. P. 
Gandito, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Gandlakamma, r. Kumool dis M. P. 
Gandwara, Pumeah dis, Behar B, 
Ganehar, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 
Ganesganj, Seoni dis, C. P. 
Ganeshgarh, Bickaneer x. R. A. 
Ganesh Khind, Poona dis, Bo. P. 
Ganeswari, r. Garo Hills dis, A. 
Ganga, r, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 
Ganga Bal, /. Kashmir x. P. 
Gangad, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 
Gangadhar, r. Goalpara dis, A. 
Ganga^hat, Unao d%s, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Gangaikondan, Tinnevell^ dis, M. P. 
Gangaikundapur, Um, Tnchinopoly dis, M. F, 
Gangajalghati, Bankoora </}x, B. 
Gangakhair, Hyderabad (Nizams). H. 
Gangamula, h, Kadur dis, Mysore x. M. P» 
Gangan, r. N. W. P. 
Gangani, Midnapore dis, B. 
Gangani, Nuddea dis, B. 
Gangapada, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 
Gangapat, r. Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 
Gangapur, dis, Teypore x. R. A, 
Gangapur, Nasik dis, 60. P. 
Gangapur, Gwaliorx. C. I. A. 
Gangapur, par, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 
Gangarampur, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 
Gangarampur, Dinagepore dis, B. 
Gangasagar, fair, 24-Pergannahs dis, B. 
Gangatya, M3nmensingh dis, B. 
Ganga wali, r. Kanara dis. Bo. P. 
Gangayavalle, Cuddapah dis, M. P. 
Ganges, r. N. W. P. and B. 
Ganghiri, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 
Gangia, r. Goalpara dis, A. 
Gangiru, Muzaffamaear ^ix, N. W. P. 
Gangli, Tonk x. R. A. 
Gangnagar, Rungpore dis, B. 
Gangni, Nuddea ^tx, B. 
Gangoh, par, Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 
Gangoli, par, Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 



Digitized by 



Google 



( xxxvi ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



G. 

Gai^otri, /. p, Garhwal dis, N. W. P. 

Gangpur, s, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Gangrar, par^ Thallawar s, R. A. 

Gangsara, Nuddea dis, B. 

Gangua, r. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Ganguli, South Canara dis, M. P. 

Gangupiya Mahadeo, /./. Sirohi J. R. A. 

Gangur, Burdwan dis^ B. 

Gangura, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Gangwana, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Gangwara, Rewah j, C. I. A. 

Ganjal, r., Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Ganjam, cap^ and dis, M. P. 

Ganjam, Mysore s, M. P. 

Ganjbahar, r. Shikarpur dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Ganjibho^ara, o,n.d, , Ahmednagar </i>, Bo. P. 

Ganjinadi, r. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Ganjo, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Ganod, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Ganrapota,, /air, Nuddea dis, B. 

Ganre, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Gansar, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Gantang, /. Bashahr x. P. 

Ganthiol, s. Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Ganutia, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Ganwan, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Garadaha, Pubna dis, B. 

Garadwara, Dehra Dun dis, N. W. P. 

Garag, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Garaghat, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Garaghat, r. Raipur dis, C. P. 

Garal, r. Furreedpore and Jessore dis, B. 

Garariya, Banda dis, N. W. P, 

Garaspur, Gwalior, s, C. I. A. 

Garaut, par, Indore s, C. I. A, 

Garbeta, s. d, Midnapore dis, B. 

Garden Reach, sub, Calcutta 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Gardeshwar, Rajpipla s, Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

Gardo, Cutch s, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Gardwasi, Jeypore x. R. A. 

Garerhat, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Gargaja, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Gargariba, Maldah dis, B. 

Gargoti, Kolhapur x. Bo. P. 

Garha, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Garha, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Garha, par, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 

Garha, //. Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Garhakota, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Garhakota Ramna,/. r, Saugor dis, C, P. 

Garhamur, A. 

Garh Cbawand, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Garhani, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Garhbori, t, and ft, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Garhchapa, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

GarhcMtoli. Chanda, dis, C. P. 

Garhdiwala, Hoshiarpur dis, P. 

Garhgaon, Kamrup dis, A. 

Garhguchha, par, Dewas x. C. I. A. 

Garh Hinglaj, ft, Kolhapur x. Bo. P. 

Garhi, Banswara x. R. A. 

Garhi, Dang x. Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Garhi, C. I. A. 

Garhi, par, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Garhi, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Garhi Ambapaip, par, Bhopal x. €• !• A« 



a 

Garhi Habibulla, Hazara dis, P. 

Garhi Harsaru, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Garhi Hassan, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Garhi Kalla, Delhi dis, P. 

Garhi Khera, Upper Sind Frontier ^tx, Sind, Bo. P, 

Garhi Kotaha, Umballa dis, P. 

Garhi Yasin, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Garhjat, states in C. P. and ChoU Nagpore, B. 

Garh Maharaja, Jhang dis, P. 

Garhmau, Jharsi dis, N. W. P. 

Garhmuktesar, p,p, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Garhoi, r, C. P. 

Garh Pihra, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Garhshankar, x.^., Hoshiarpur dis, P. 

Garhvi, r. Chanda dis, C. r. 

Garhwal, dis, and x. N. W. P. 

Garhwa, Lohardugga dis, ChoU Nagpore, B, 

Garia, 24-Pergunnah5 dis, B. 

Gariajan, r, Lakhimpur dis, A. 

Garkano, r, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Garkha, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Gamemetta, Cuddapah dis, M. P. 

Garo Hills, h, and dis, A. 

Garola, i, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Garotha, x.^. Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Garra, r, N. W. P. 

Garrauli x. Bundelkhand, C. I. A* 

Gam, Kohat dis, P. 

Garudangiri, h. Mysore x. M. P. 

Garuman, f, r, Darrang dis, A. 

Garwa, Lohardugga dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Garwar, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 

Gaih, r. Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Gatonga, Sibsagar dis, A. 

Gaubachwa, h, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Gaudhalli, Coorg, M. P. 

Gauhari, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Gauhati, cap, Kamrup dis, A. 

Gaunder, /./. Jeypore x. R. A. 

Gaunikia, h, Pooree dts, Orissa, B. 

Gaur, r. Maldah dis, B. 

Gaur, r. Mandla dis, C . P. 

Gaur, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Gaura, fair, Midnapore dis, B. 

Gaura, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Gaura Jamun, par, Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N.W.P, 

Gaura Badshapur, Jaunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Gaurandi ; Manbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Gaurang, r, Goalpara dis, A. 

Gaurangdihi ; Manbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Gaurihar, / Bundelkhand, C. I. A« 

Gauripur, Goalpara dis, A. 

Gauripur, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Gaurjhamar, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Gaumadi, Backergunge dis, B. 

Gaumagar, Jessore, dis, B. 

Gauti, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Gavipur, tem. Bangalore dis, Mysore, M. P. 

Gaw, r. Amherst dis, B. B. 

Gawen, Mooltan dis, P. 

Gawhali, Mewas x. Bo. P. 

Gawilgurh, h, and ft, Ellichpur dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Gawtamaw, Prome dis, B. B. 

Gayabari, Darjeeling dis, B. 

Gayanghat, Sylhet dis, A. 

Gayhatta, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 



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Google 



( xxxvii ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



A. 
A. 



Gazirhat, fair^ Midnapore, dis^ B. 

Gazol, Maldah dis, B. 

Geb Sagar, /. Dungarpur s, R. A. 

Gela Bil, 

Geleka, 

Genguti, r. Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Genokhali, (Cowcolly) Lt.house, Midnapore dis, B. 

Georgegarh, ft, Gurgaon dis^ P. 

Gersappa, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Gersoppa, Shimoga dis^ Mysore s, M. P. 

Gewarda, z. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Gbadwara, s, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Ghagar, r. Backergunge dis^ b. 

Ghaggar, r. Umballa^tV, P. 

Gh^, r, Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Ghagri, n Bhagalpur, dis, Behar, B. 

Ghagra, r. Lakhimpur dis, A. 

Ghagra, r. Cachar flft>, A. 

Ghagradamarpur, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B, 

Ghaibi Dero, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Chairatganj, par, Bhopal, s, C. I. A. 

Ghakkhar, Gujranwala dis, P. 

Ghal, Ferozepore dis, P. 

Ghalampur, par, Unao dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Ghalib, Ludniana dis, P. 

Ghalkhurd, Ferozqpore, dis, P. 

Ghan, r. Berar, H. A. D. 

Ghanauli, Umballa dis, P. 

Ghanerao, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Ghansor, /. and tern, Seoni dis, C. P. 

Ghapni, Jhang dis, P. 

Ghar, r, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Ghara, r. P. 

Gharaunda, Kamal dis, P. 

Gharenda, Amritsar dis, P. 

Ghargaon, Ahmednagar, dis. Bo. P. 

Gharo, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Gharo, cr, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Gharrial, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Gharuta, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Ghatal, s,d, Midnapore dis, B. 

Ghatampur, par, Cawnpore dis, N. W, P. 

Ghatbile, beel, Jessore dis, B. 

Ghatbori, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D» 

Ghateshwara, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Ghat^har, Poona ^iV, Bo. P. 

Ghatigaon, Gwalior, s, C. I. A. 

Ghati Subramanya, /./. Bangalore, Mysore s. M. P. 

Ghatkul /. and/ar. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Ghat-Lahchora, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Ghatol, Banswara s, R. A. 

Ghatprabha, r. Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Ghats, Eastn. and Westn., Bo. and M. P. 

Ghatsila, Singhbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B, 

Ghaunwo, h. Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Ghauspur, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Ghazi, Hazara dis, P. 

Ghaziabad, j. d,, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Ghazipur, s.d. Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Ghazipur, cap, and dis, N. W. P. 

Ghaziuddinnagar, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Ghazni, /. and /?. A%hanistan. 

Ghazni Khel, Bannu dis, P. 

Ghegal, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Ghera Karsarilingana, Kolaba, dis. Bo. P. 

Ghera Killa Sagargarh, Kolaba dis^ Bo. P. 



Q. 

Ghera Surgarh, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Gheria, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Gheria, b. f» Mooishedabad dis^ B. 

Ghes, «. Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Ghiar, Dacca dis, B. 

Ghiaspur, /ar, Patna</i>, Behar, B. 

Ghiladari, r. Darrang dis, A. 

Ghiror, /ar, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Ghirwan, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Ghisri, r, Balaghat dis, C. P. 

Ghiswa, Jaunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Ghizri, san. Karaehi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Ghodnadi, r. Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Ghoga, Bha^pur dis, Behar, B. 

Ghogwa, r, Raipur, dis, C. P. 

Gholwad, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Ghora, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Ghorabari, Karachi dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Ghoradar, s. Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Ghoraghat, Dinagepore dis, B. 

Ghoramara, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Ghoramara, Rungpore dis, B. 

Ghoramara, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Ghoranji, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Ghorapachhar, r. C. I. A. 

Ghorasahan, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Ghorasar, s, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Ghora Utra, r., Mymensingh ^£r, B. 

Ghorbari, tal, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Ghordia, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Ghoregaon, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Ghonghat, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Ghoriwala, Bannu dis, P. 

Ghorkat, Rewah x. C. I. A. 

Ghosala, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Ghose, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B* 

Ghosganw, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Ghoshpara, fair, Nnddea dis, B. 

Ghosi, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Ghot «. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Ghotan, Ahmednagar dis, Bo. P. 

Ghotana, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Ghotgewari, Belgaum dis, Bo. P. 

Ghoti, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Ghotki, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Ghotru, Jeysulmere s, R. A. 

Ghughri, Mandla dis, C. P. 

Ghugus, tern, and t, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Ghufamnabi, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Ghungijuri, A. 

Ghunsla dis, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Ghunwara, Rewah, s, C. I. A. 

Ghurawal, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Ghurpur, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Ghusal, j>. Bashahr s. P. 

Ghusar ; Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Ghutku, Bilaspur dis, C, P. 

Gidhaur, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Gidhaur Gali, /. Peshawar dis, P. 

Gidn Bandar, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Gidujo Tando, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Gihalpur, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo, P. 

Gilgaon, z, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Gilghit, Kashmir s,, P. 

Gillanwali, Gurdaspur, dis, P, 

Gingee, h. South Arcot, dis^ M. P. 



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Google 



( XXXVlll ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



Q. 

Gir, Kattywar Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Gir, Sorath dis, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Girar, Wardha dis, C. P. 

Giraur, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

Girdabadi, h, Ganjam, dis^ M. P. 

Giria, b,f, Moorshedabad dis^ B. 

Gir^um, Bombay town, Bo. P. 

Gindih, Hazariba^h dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Giriyak, Gya dis^ Behar, B. 

Girjasthan, /. p, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Gima, r. Nasik dis^ Bo. P. 

Gimar, Sorath dis^ Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Gimi, Dera Ismail Khan dis^ P. 

Girod, Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Giroli, Basim dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Girwai, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Girwan, Banda dis, N. W. P, 

Girwardi, s. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Gnapootaw, Bassein dis, B. B. 

Gnathaingkhyoung, Bassein dis, B. B« 

Gnyoungbeng, Rsmgoon dis^ B. B. 

Gnyoungbeng, Prome dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungbenggyee, Prome dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungbenghla, Kyoukhpyoo dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungbengrwa, Henzada dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungbengtha, Toungn^oo dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungbengtha, Prome dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungbengtha, Henzada dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungbengtshiep, Thayetmyo dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungbengtshiep, Amherst eUs, B. B. 

Gnyoungdan, Prome dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungdoon or Yandoon, Thonkwa dis, B. B. 

Gnyounggoon, Amherst dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungkhyoung, Henzada dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungkhyoung, Thonkwa dis, B. B. 

Gnyounglebeng, Shwegyeng </t>, B. B. 

Gnyoungrwagyec, Henzada dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungtsare, Prome dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungtseng, Tavoy dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungtsenggyee, Prome dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungwaing, Shwegyei^ dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungwon, Prome dis, B. B. 

Gnyoungwon, Thayetmyo dis, B. B. 

Goa, Portuguese Settlement, Bo. P. 

Goalpara, cap, and dis, A. 

Goalundo, s, d, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Gobardanga, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Gobardhan, f.p, Muttra dis, N. W. P. 

Gobardhangiri, fi, Shimoga dis, Mysore J. M. P. 

Gobarhat, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Gobichetti Palyam, Coimbatore, dis, M. P. 

Gobindaganj, Rungpore dis, B. 

Gobindapur, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Gobindganj, Sylhet dis, A. 

Gobindganj, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Gobindganj, Bogra dis, B. 

Gobindgarh, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Gobindgarh, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Gobindpur, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Gobindpur, s. d, Manbhoom dis, Cbota Nagpore B. 

Gobindi, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Gobindpur, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Gobri, r. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Goda Aunada, Burdwan dis, B. 

Godagari, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Godahaddo, r. Ganjam dis, M. P. 



a 

Godavari, r. and dis, M. P. 

Godawari, h, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Godda, s,d, Sonthal Peigunnahs dis, Bdiar, B. 

Godhra, cap. Panch BiahiUs dis. Bo. P. 

Godhra, Cutch s. Bo. P. 

Godna, fair, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Godoli, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Goela, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Gogawa, Indore x. C. I. A, 

Goghat, Burdwan dis, B. 

Gogo, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Gogra, r. N. W. P. 

Gogra, r. Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Gogri, Mon^hyr dis, Behar, B. 

Gogunda, dts, Oodeypore x. R. A. 

Goh, par, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

GohaA,ft. Gwalior f. C. I. A. 

Gohail, Bogra dis, B. 

Gohaltor, Midnapore dis, B. 

Gohan, Jalaun du, N. W. P. 

Gohana, RohUk dis, P. 

Gohela, Kamal dis, P. 

Gohelwar, dis, Kattjrwar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Gohira, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Gohpur,Darrang dis, A. 

Gohram Mari, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Gohuan, r. Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Goi, r. C. I. A. 

GoiUah, Backeigunge dis, B. 

Gokak, ted, Belgaum dis, Bo. P. 

Gokam, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Gokama, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Gokaru, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Gokh, Dajjeeling dis, B. 

Gokhiya, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Gokul, /./. Muttra dis, N. W. P. 

Gola, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Gola, petr, Hazaribagh dis, Cbota-Nagp«re, B. 

Gola, s.d, and dis, Pklanpur s, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Gola, s.d. Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Gola Gokamath, Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Golaghat, /. and s,d, Sibsa^ dis^ A« 

Golandi, r. Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Golap, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Golapgani, Sylhet dis, A. 

Golcondan ft, and ru, H. 

Goldinganj, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Goler, Kangra dis, P. 

Golgeri, Ksdadgi dis. Bo. P. 

Golgonda, tal, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Gollaprol, s. Godavan dis, M. P. 

Gollagudem, Upper Godavari dis, C. P. 

Gorahat, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Goma, Goalpara dis, A. 

Goma, r, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Goma, r. Mewas s, Rewakanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Gomai, r. Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Gomastapur, Maldah dis, B. 

Gomati, r. Tipperah dis, B. 

Gomia, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Gomti, r, Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Gon, r. Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W, P. 

Gona, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

Gonal, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Gonasika, r, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Good, r. Kolaba dis^ Bo. P. 



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( xxxix ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



Gonda, cap, and dis, Oadh, N. W. P. 

Gondt, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Gondal, Hallar ^t>, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Gondal, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Gondi, Hamirpui dis, N. W. P. 

Gondlanwala, Gujranwala dis, P. 

Gondumri, e, Bhajidaia, dis, C. P. 

Gondwana, d, c. C. I. A 

Gondwarai, Purneah dit, Behar, B. 

Goomsur, tal, Gan^m dis, M. P. 

Goona, cant, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Gooty, /. and tal, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Gop, h, Midnapore dis, B. 

Gop, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Gopala, Chumparun dit, Behar, B. 

Gopalawanagudd, Belgaam dis. Bo. P. 

Gopaganj, s, d, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

GopaiganL Farreedpore dis, B. 

Gopalgani, Partab^urfa dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Gopalgarh, dis, Bhurtpore s, R. A. 

Gopalnagar, Bankoora dis, B. 

Gopalnagar, Nuddea dis, B. 

Gc^pur, par,, Durbhonga dis, Behar, B. 

Gopalpnr, Bordwan dis, B. 

Gopalpnr, Cnttack eUs, Qrissa, B. 

Gopalpor, Furreedpore ais, B. 

Gopalpur, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Gopalpur, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Gopalpor, Jalaon dis, N. W. P, 

Gopalpur, par. Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Gopalpur, Ganjam</i>, M. P. 

Gopalpur, Rungpore dis, B. 

Gopalpur, s. Godavari dis, M. P. 

Gopalpura, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Gopalpura, Bickaneer s. R. A. 

Gopamau,/ar, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Gopat, r. Rewah s. C. I. A. 

Gopiballabhpur, Midnapore dis, B. 

Gopijanj, Midnapore dts, B. 

Gopijanj, Mirzaprar dis, N, W. P. 

Gopinathpur, fair, Bogra dis, B. 

Gopinathpur, par, Rajshabye dis, B. 

Gopshitta, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Gor, If. II. Sylbet dis, A. 

Gora, Rajpiplaj. Rewakanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Gora, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Goraghat, ru, Bogra dis, B. 

GoraC Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Gorai, r. Nuddea dis, B. 

Gorakhpur, cap, and dis, N. W. P. 

Goramji, h. and jA. Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Goranari, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Goraora, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Gorchani, Hyderadad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Gordhanpur, par, Muiaffiuuagar dis, N, W. P. 

Goregaon, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Goregarh, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Gorha, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Gori, p, p. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Goria, far, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Goribidnur, Kolar dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Goriganga, r. N. W. P. 

Gormin, /?. Gwalior /. C. I. A. 

Gorura, r. Singhbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

GosaiO'Durgapur, Nuddea dis, B. 

Gosainmath, /. p, Patna dis, Behar, B. 



Q. 

Gosalpur, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Goshainganj, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Goshainganj, Lucknow dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Goshainsar, Bickaneer j. R. A. 

Gostanadi, r. Godavari dis, M. P. 

Gosthani, r. Vizagapatam ^i>, M. P. 

Goswami Durgapur, y2w>, Nuddea ^w, B. 

Gotardi, «. Mewasi. Rewakanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Gothkhola, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Gothna, Ratnagiri dis^ Bo. P. 

Gothni, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Gotio Ambo, /./. Banswara s, R. A. 

Gotra, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Gottarao,y?. Sind, Bo. P. 

Goungtsekywon, i. Amherst dis, B. B. 

Gouriganj, Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Govindgarh, Ulwur s, R. A. 

Govindgarh, ft, Amritsar dis, P. 

Govindgarh, ft, Rewah j. C. I. A. 

Govindpur, s,d, Manbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Gowa, par, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Gowali, Rajpipla s, Rewakanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Gowan, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Gowan, Budaun dis, N. W. P. 

Goyainghat, A. 

Goyas, Moorshedabad^/i>, B. 

Goyathwa, r, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Gramang, Bashahr s. P. 

Gram-Kaina, Burdwan dis, B. 

Guadur, Mekran Coast, Baluchistan. 

Gualpukhar, Purneah dis, Behar. B. 

Guasuaba, r, 24-Peigunnahs dis, B. 

Guatali, Nuddea dis, B. 

Gubbi, Tumkur dis, Mj^sore /. M. P. 

Gubchani, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Gubraiya, r, Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Gudalur, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Gudalur, Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Gudalur, r.s, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Guddelam, r. South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Gudgeri, Miraj s. Bo. P. 

Gud^ddapur, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Gudibanda, Kolar dis, Mysore s, M. P, 

Gudicherla, ». Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Gudivada, tal, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Gudiyatam, tai. North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Gudur, par, and z, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Gudur, tal, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Guduvancheri, Chingleput dis, M. P. 

Gugera, Montgomery ais, P. 

Gugor,^?. Tonk j. R. A. 

Gugupara, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Guhi^ar, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Gujainli, Bashahr ;. P. 

Gu]arkhan, Rawalpindi </i>, P. 

Guindy, Chingleput dis, M. P. 

Gujranwala, cap, and dis, P. 

Gujri, Dhar s, C. I. A. 

Gujrat, cap, and dis, P. 

Gulabibagh, Lahore dis, P. 

Gulaothi, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Gulbui^ah, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P, 

Guldaha, beel, Maldah dis, B. 

Guledgudd, Kaladgi</ix, Bo. P. 

Guleri,/. P. 

Gulgaon, par, Bhopal s, C. I. A. 



Digitized by 



Google 



{ XL ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



Gull, r. Nimar (its, C. P. 

GuHstan-Karez, Kelat or Baluchistan. 

Gulma, r. A. 

Gulmarg, h. and san^ Kashmir s. P. 

Gul Muhammadwah, ca^ Shikarpur dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Gultanganj, Sarun, dis^ Behar, B. 

GuIshaSi, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Gulzarbagh, Patna dis^ Behar, B. 

Gulzarganj, Jaunpur</i>, N. W. P. 

Guma, duar^ Goalpara dis^ A. 

Gumal, Dera Ismail Khan dis^ P. 

Gumai, Midnapore dis^ B. 

Gumani, r. 5onthal Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Gumanpur, Gwaliorj. C. I. A. 

Gumar, Mandi, s, P. 

Gumaria, r. Raipur dis^ C. P. 

Gumatti, Bannu^t^, P. 

Gumbat, Kohat dis, P. 

Gumgaon, //. and tern. Nagpur dis. C. P. 

Gumear, far, Midnapore dts^ B. 

Gumiya, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Gumnaya Kanpalya, /a/, Kolar</rj, Mysore i. M. P. 

Gumon, par, Hazaribagh dis^ Chota Nagpore, B. 

Gumon, Hazaribagh dU^ Chota Nagpore, B. 

Gumti, r. N. W. P. 

Gumti, r. Tipperah dis, B. 

Gumas, /. Bashahr s, P. 

Gund, s, P. 

Gundar, r. Madura dis, M. P. 

Gundardehi, z. Raipur dis, C. P. 

Gnnder, r. Nellore dis, M. P. 

Gundlakamma, r. Nellore dis, M. P. 

Gundlamau, par^ Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Gundluhole, r, Mysore s, M. P. 

Gundlupet, Mysore s. M. P. 

Gundoj, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Gundoiao, /. Kishengurh s, R. A. 

Gunduk, r. Sarun and Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Gundwa, par, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Gungaur, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Gum, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Gunir, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Gunjana, r. Cuddapah dis, M. P. 

GunjewsJii. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Gunji, A. Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Gunnaur, Budaun dis, N. W. P. 

Gunnavaram, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Gunri, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Guntakal, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Guntasoma, r. Bellary dis, M. P. 

Gunthno, h. Banswara s, R. A. 

Guntiakhali, r. 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Guntur, tal, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Gunwant, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Gunwantgarh, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

H. 

Hab, r. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Habiganj, Sylhet dis, A. 
Habra, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 
Habur, Jeysulmere s, R. A. 
Hadalgeri, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 
Hadalsang, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 
Hadargeri, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 
Hadoti, Kerowlee s, R. A. 



Q. 

Gupta, r. Bellary dis, M. P. 

Gupteshwar, /&iV and /./. Shahabad </i>, Behar, B. 

Guptipara, Hooghly</iV, B. 

Gur, r. Rajshahye dis, B. 

Gura, Jodhpore s. R. A. 

Gurai, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Guraiya, r. Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Gurari, par, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Gurbakahganj, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Gurdaspur, cap, and dis, P. 

Gurdhoi, r. Unao dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Gureh, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Gurehalli, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Gurgaon, cap, and dis, P. 

Gurha, ReWah s, C. I, A. 

Gurhni, Sarun dis, B. 

Guriani, Gurgaon //w, P. 

Guriani, Rohtak dis, P. 

Guriya, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Gurjama, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Gurjipara, Rungpore dis, B. 

Gurjogania, A. 

Gurramkonda, h. Cuddapah dis, M. P. 

Gursahaiganj, Farrukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Gursahaiganj, Fatehgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Gursarai, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Gurua, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Gurul-Husur, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Gurupura, r. Sou& Canara dis, M. P. 

Guruva)rur, Malabai dis, M. P. 

Gurwali, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Guskara, Burdwan dis, B. 

Gutala, «. Godavari dis, M. P. 

Guttal, Dharwar dis. Bo. P, 

Guwarich, par, Gonda dis, Oudh N. W. P. 

Guyabala, r. Jodhpore j. R. A. 

Guyai, r. Manbhoom //«>, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Guynd, Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Guzerat, or Gujarat, pr. Bo. P. 

Gwalior, cap, ft. and s, C. I. A. 

Gwarighat, ford, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Gwekhyo, r. Prome dis, B. B. 

G)ra, cap, and </m, Behar, B. 

Gyabnu, h, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Gyaing /. and r. Amherest dis, B. B. 

Gyaing Attaran, Amherst dis, B. B. 

Gyaingthanweng, Amherst dis, B. B. 

Gyaraspur, par, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Gyobeng, Prome dis, B. B. 

Gyobengtha, Prome dis, B. B. 

Gyogoon, Thayetmyo dis, B. B. 

Gyowa, Thayetmyo. dis, B. B. 

Gyoyatha, Prome dis, B. B. 

Gywondoung, Thayetmyo dis, B. B. 



H. 

Hadgali, Bellary dit, M. P. 
Hadianw, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 
Hadrakh, Jalaun dis, N. W. P. 
Hafizabad, Gujranwala dis, P. 
Hafizganj, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 
Haguria, beeL Rajshahye dis, B. 
Haidarabad, par, Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Haidarabad, Dera-Ismail-Khan dis, P. 



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( xli ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



H. 

Hagari, r. and r,s, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Hauttpur, Maldah dis, 6. 

Haidaurgarh, s.d. Bara Bank! dis, Oudb, N. W. P. 

Haidar jo Tando, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Hail Haor, A. 

Hailakandi, Cachar dis, A. 

Hajameo, cr, Karachi dis, Sind, Ba P« 

Hajamri, r. Sind, Bo. P. 

Hajeepore, x. d, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Hajiganj, Tipperah dis, B. 

Hajipur, Hoshiarpur dis, P. 

Haji Sanwan, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Haji Shah, Rawalpindi, dis, P. 

Hajo^ tem» and /./. Kamrup dis, A. 

Hakaluki, A. 

Hala, tal, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Halani, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Halda, r. Chittagong dis, B. 

Haldaur, Bijnor dis, N. W. P. 

Haldharpur, Azamgarh, dis, N. W. P. 

Haldi, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 

Haldi, r. Midnapore dis, B. 

Haldibari, s,d. Cooch Behar dis, B. 

Haldipada, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Haldipur, r. Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Haldwani, Kumaun, dis, N. W. P. 

Halebid, Hassan dis, Mysore j. M. P. 

Halena, Bhurtpore s, R. A. 

Haleri, /.A.I. Coorg, M. P. 

Halgen, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Hahsahar, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B, 

Haliya, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Haliyal, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Halla, Lahore dis, P. 

Hallar, dis, Kattywar, Gnjarat, Bo. P. 

Halol, Panch Mahals dis. Bo. P. 

Holon, r. Mandia dis, C. P. 

Halsa, Nnddea dis, B. 

Halsangi, par, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Halshi, Belgaum, dis. Bo. P. 

Haiti, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Haluaf hat, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Haluanati, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Halur, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Halwad, Jhalawad dis, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Hamdampur, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Hamidpur, par, Durbnunga dis, Behar, B. 

Hamirgarh, Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Hamirpur, ciip, and dis, N. W. P. 

Hamirpur, Kangra dis, P. 

Hamp, r. Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Hampasagar, Bellaiy dis, M. P. 

Hampi, tem, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Handi, m, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Handia, AUahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Handia, ft, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Handial, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Handiapur, Gwalior s, C. I. A« 

Handiyal, Vyxhm. dis, B. 

Handugujjar, Lahore dis, I*. 

Handwa, par, Sonthal Peigunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Hanga, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Hangal, tal, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Hango, Bashahr s, P. 

Hangrang, /. Bashahr x. P. 

Hangu, s,d, Kohat dis, P. 



K 

Hanjarwal, Lahore dis, P. 

Hanmantgad, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Hanmantghat, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Hansaleshwar, e, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Hansera, Bickaneer x. R. A. 

Hansi, Hissar €Hs, P. 

Hanskhali, Nuddea dis, B. 

Hansot, Broach dis. Bo. P. 

Hansuwa, Gy^ dis, Behar, B. 

Hantra, Nuddea dis, B. 

Hanumana, Rewah x. C. I. A. 

Hanumanganj, Allahal)ad //tx, N. W. P. 

Hanumanganj, Partabgarh dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Hanwasbhavi, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Haodabil, /. Mymensingh dis, B. 

Haoragang, r, Tipperah dis, B. 

Haors, marshes, Sylhet dis, A. 

Hapa, e. Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Hapur, s.d. Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Harahadi, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Haraf, r. Panch Mahals dis. Bo. P. 

Harai, «. Chhindwara dis, C. P. 

Haramak, m, Kashmir x. P. 

Harang or Juhang, m, Cachar dis, A. 

Harankashi, r. Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Haranpur, Jhelum dis, P. 

Harappa, Montgomery dis, P. 

Harat, Damoh dis, G. P. 

Harauni, Lucknow dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Harbang, Chittagong dis, B. 

Harchaka, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Harchandpur, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P» 

Harda, /. and s.d. Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Hardah, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Hardauli, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Hardi, r, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Hardoi, cap, and dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Hardoi, Jalaun dis, N. W. P. 

Hardoi, par, Rae Bareli, dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Harduaganj, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Hardwar, t, and /./. Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Hargam, par, Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Harha, par, Unao dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Hari, r. Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 

Haria, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Hariagadi, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Hariana, /. c, Hissar and Sirsa dis, P. 

Hariana, Hoshiarpur dis, P. 

Harichandranadi, r. Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Harida, r. Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Harida Manda, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Haridravati, r. Mysore x. M. P. 

Harigaon, Garo Hills dis, A. 

Harihar, p,p, Chitaldroop^ dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Harihara, Chumparun du, Behar, B. 

Harihareshwarabetta, h, Kolar dis, Mysore x. M.P, 

Hariharganj, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B» 

Hariharpara, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Hariharpur, Kadur dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Hariharpur, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Harike, Lahore dis, P. 

Harinakunda, Jessore dis, B. 

Haringhata, r. Jessore dis, B. 

Harinia, beel, Jessore dis, B, 

Haripal, Hooghly dis, B. 

Haripani, r, Goalpara cUs, A. 



Digitized 



ly Google 



( xHi ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



H. 

Haripur, h,s, Sonthal Pergtmnahs dis^ Behar, B. 

Haripur, Pubna^/ex, B. 

Haripur, Kangra </ij, P. 

Haripur, s.d. Hazara dis, P. 

Haripur, Kashmir s, P. 

Harishankarpur, Jessore dis^ B. 

Harishchandragarh, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Harishchandragarh, m. Poona dis^ Bo. P. 

Harishchandrapur, Maldah dis^ B. 

Harishchandranadi, r. Tanjore dis^ M. P. 

Harispur, t,s» Cuttack dis^ Orissa, B. 

Hariya, Midnapore dis^ B. 

Hariya, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Harka, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Harkia, /. C. I. A. 

Harlakhi, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Harmara, Ajmere dis^ R. A. 

Hamai, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Hamau, r. Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Hamaut, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Harnhalli, Hassan dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Haro, r. Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Haro, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Haroa, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Harol, e» Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Harowtee, group of States, R. A. 

Harpanahalli, tal, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Harpur Goanar, p.p, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Harrand, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Harsar, Poona, dis. Bo. P. 

Harsol, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Harsul, Peint s, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Harur, Salem dis, M. P, 

Haiun, Rawulpindi dis, P. 

Harwdli, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Hasanabad, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Hasan Abdal, cant, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Hasangarh, par, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Hashanpur,/flr, Moradabad dis, N. W. P, 

Hasanpur, Gurgaon, dis, N. W. P. 

Hasara, Dacca dis, B. 

Hasanpura, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Hasanpur Maghar, /./. and r, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Hashtnagar, s, d, Pesnawur dis, P. 

Hasilpur, par, Indore s. C. I. A. 

Hassan, cap, and dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Hassananammapet, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Hassanpur, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Hassanur, ghat, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Hastinapur, par, and r. Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Haswa, Gya dis, Behar B. 

Haswa, par, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Hata, Akola du, Berar, H. A. D. 

Hata, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Hatandha, par, Pumeah dis, Behar, B, 

Hatauri, Durbhunga dis, Behar B. 

Hatgarh, Nasik dis, Bo. P. 

Hathazari, Chittagong dis, B. 

Hathgaon, par, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Hathibari,/. r. Bilaspur //w, C. P. 

Hathichangi, A. 

Hathimura, A. 

Hathiya, Noakholly </iV, B. 

Hathkeshwar, Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Hathmati, r. Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Hathmati, r. Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 



H. 

Hathras, s. d, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Hathuwa, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Hati, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Hatianadi, r, Noakholly dis, B. 

Hatiapahar, h. Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Hatimanda, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Hatipawa, h, Rewah J. C. I. A. 

Hatni, r. C. I. A. 

Hatni, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Hatri, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Hatta, /. and s,d, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Hatta, z, Balaghat dis, C. P. 

Hattar, Hazara dis, P. 

Hattian, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Hattimattur, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Hattin, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Hattugatnad, hob, Coorg, M. P. 

Hatur, Yedenalknad tal, Coorg, M. P. 

Hatwa, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Hautghnr, z. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Haved, Bannu dis, P. 

Haveli, Baria s, Rewa Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P, 

Haveli, par, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Haveli, o,n,d, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Haveli, Jaunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Haveli, par, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Haveli, Montgomery dis, P. 

Haveri, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Havi, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Havinhudgalli, tal, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Hawala Mohanpur, Darrang dis, A. 

Hawalbagh, /. Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Hawanur, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Haweli, Chumpanm dis, Behar, B. 

Haweli, par, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Haweli, par, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Haweli Oudh, par, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P, 

Haweli Durbhunga, p>ar, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Hazara, dis, P. 

Hazaribagh, cap, and dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Hazar-Pir, Afghanistan 

Hazarpur, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Hazartakki, par, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Hazradi, /ar, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Hazrat, Budaun dis, N. W. P. 

Hazro, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Hebbur, ft, Tumkur dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Hebli, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Hebsur, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Heggadadevankot, Mysore x. M. P. 

Hegra, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Helak, Bhurtpore x. R. A. 

Hemadevarabetta, h, Tumkur dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Hemavati, r. Mysore x. M. P. 

Hemda, r. Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Hemtabad, Dinagepore dis, B. 

Henria, Midnapore dis, B. 

Henzada, cap, and dis, B. B. 

Heran, r. Chota Udepur x. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Heranwah, ca, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo, P. 

Herat, cap, and/r. Afghanistan. 

Here, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Heshla, par, Manbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Hetimganj, A. 

Hidaipur, Nuddea dis, B. 

Hijalna, Burdwan dis, B. 



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( xliii ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



H. 

Hila, beelf Rajshahye dis, B. 

Hili,y5M>, Bogra r/iV, B. 

Hilna, be^ly Rajshahye dis, 6. 

Hilsa, Patna disy Behar, B. 

Hilsamari, r, Dacca dis^ B. 

Himadgopalbetta, h. Mysore dis^ Mysore s, M. P. 

Himalaya, m,r. Northern India 

Himalgarh, ft, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Himmatsar, Bicknaneer s, R. A. 

Himsagar, j'Sif r, 24-Pergunnahs ^/ j, B. 

Himseparvata, h, Kadur dts, Mysore s, M. P. 

Hinauta, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Hinauti, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Hindan, r. N. W. P. 

Hindaun, /. and dis, Jeypore j. R. A. 

Hindiganalu, Bangalore dis^ Mysore s, M. P. 

Hindol, t.s, Cuttack dis^ Orissa, B. 

Hindoli, Tonk s, R. A. 

Hindoria, Damoh dis^ C. P. 

Hindri, r. Kumool dis^ M. P. 

Hindupatti, Shajahanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Hindupur, /a/, Bellary dis^ M. P. 

Hindur, (Nalagaih) s, Simla dis, P. 

Hingajiya, Sylhet dis, A. 

Hinganghat, /. and s. d, Wardha dis^ C. P. 

Hingla, r. Beerbhoom dis^ B. 

Hinglajgarh, ft, Indore s. C. I. A. 

Hingni, ft, Wardha dis, C. P. 

Hingoli, canty Hyderabad x. H. 

Hingona, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Hippaigi, paty Kaladgi dis^ Bo. P. 

Hirahalu, Bella^^ dis, M. P. 

Hiran, Hallar dis^ Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Hiran, r. Jubbulpore </«>, C. P. 

Hirangaon, /ar, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Hiran Phal, rapid in the Nerbudda r. C. I. A. 

Hiranyakeshi, r. Kolhapur 5. Bo. P. 

liirapur, Saus^or </iV, C. P. 

Hirapur, %, Bhopal s. C. I. A. 

Hirdnagar,^?. Mandla ^V, C. P. 

Hirebendigeri, Dharwar dis^ Bo. P. 

Hireeutti, Kanara dis^ Bo. P. 

Hirekal, h, Hassan dis^ M)rsore s, M. P. 

Hirekerur, Dharwar dis^ Bo. P. 

Hirekummigudd, Belgaum dis^ Bo. P. 

Hiriyur, /./. Chitaldroog dis^ Mysore s. M. P. 

Himi, /ar, Durbhunga Ji>, Behar, B. 

Hirod, (French Rocks) cant^ Mysore s. M. P. 

Hisampur, par^ Bahraich dis, Oadh, N. W. P. 

Hissai, capy div^ and dis^ P. 

Hiswal, Nasik dis^ Bo. P. 

Hiwarkhed, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

HIaing, Hanthawaddy dis^ B. B. 

Hodal, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Hodwara, p, h, i, Sawantwari s. Bo. P. 

Holala, fairy Mysore dis, Mysore j. M. P. 

Holalugunda, fair^ Tumkur dis^ Mysore j. M. P. 

Holang, par^ Hazaribagh dis^ Chota Nagpore, B. 

Holavanhalli, Tumkur dis^ Mysore s, M. P. 

Holongapur, A. 

Homl^I, Dharwar dis^ Bo. P. 

Honawar, /a/, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Hongal, Belgaum </m, Bo. P. 

Honnali, Shimoga dis^ Mysore s, M. P. 

Honnavalli, /a/, Tumkur dis^ Mysore j, M. P. 

Honnuhole, r. Mysore x. M. P. 



Honwad, par^ Belgaum dis^ Bo. P. 

Hooghly, capy dis^ and r. B. 

Hooghly Point, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Hope Town, Darjeeling dis^ B. 

Horsleykonda, h, Cuddapah dis^ M. P. 

Horti. par^ Kaladgi dis, Bo. P. 

Horumurokkal, h, Mercara taL Coorg, M. P. 

Horurnurokkalnad, hob^ Mercara /«/, Coorg, M. P. 

Hosdroog, South Canara dis^ M. P. 

Hosdurga, Chitaldroog dis^ Mysore s, M. P. 

Hoshangabad, cap^ and dis^ C. P. 

Hoshiarpur, cap^ and dis^ P. 

Hoskote, Bangalore dis^ Mysore s, M. P. 

Hospet, tal, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Hosritti, Dharwar dis^ Bo. P. 

Hosur, Dharwar dis^ Bo. P. 

Hosur, Salem diSy M. P. 

Hothiyan, h. Karachi diSy Sind, Bo. P. 

Hoti, Peshawur diSy P. 

Howrah, /., r.x. and s. d. Hooghly diSy B, 

Hubli, taly Dharwar diSy Bo. P. 

Hudgi, Sholapur disy Bo. P. 

Hudikeri, Kiggatnad taly Coorg, M. P. 

Hudikeri Kantmumad, hoby Mercara, Coorg, M. P. 

Hudli, Belgaum diSy Bo. P. 

Hugri or Vedavati, r, Bellary diSy M. P. 

Hujra, Montgomery diSy P. 

Hukeri, Belgaum disy Bo. P. 

Hukitola, see False Point 

Hukkeri Prant, paty Belgaum disy Bo. P. 

Hukligudda, Kanara diSy Bo. P. 

Hulaganmoradibetta, /. Mysore s, M. P. 

Hulasganj, Gya diSy Behar, B. 

Hulgur, Dharwar Vij, Bo. P. 

Huligad, Belgaum disy Bo. P. 

Hulikal, Bangalore disy M)rsore s, M. P. 

Hulikaldurga, h. Bangalore diSy M3rsore s, M, P. 

Huliyar, Chitaldroog diSy Mysore s. M. P. 

Huliyurdurga, h, Tumkur diSy Mysore s, M. P. 

Hulkopp, I)harwar diSy Bo. P. 

Hullur, Dharwar diSy Bo. P. 

Humar, Pooree disy Orissa, B. 

Humayun, Shikarpur diSy Sind, Bo. P. 

Humcha, Shimoga diSy Mysore s, M. P. 

Hundia, Hoshangabad disy C. P. 

Hungund, taly Kaladgi diSy Bo. P. 

Hunsur, Mysore diSy Mysore t, M. P. 

Hunterganj, Hazaribagh disy Chota Nagpore, B. 

Hurka, Kuchi A. 

Hussain, Aligarh diSy N. W. P. 

Husainabad, 24-Pergunnahs diSy B. 

Husainabad, Lohardugga diSy Chota Nagpore, B, 

Husainganj, Fatehpur disy N. W. P. 

Husaingam, Pumeah diSy Behar, B. 

Husainshahi, /ar, Mymensingh diSy B. 

Husri, Hyderabad diSy Sind, Bo. P. 

Hutridurga, h. Tumkur disy Mysore, s, M. P. 

Huvinahadgalli, Bellary diSy M. P. 

Huzurapur, pary Rajshahye disy B. 

Huzur Tahsil, quarter of Agra, Agmdisy N. W. P. 

HuzurTahsil, qr. of Benares, Benares diSy N. W. P. 

Hyderabad, cap, and diSy Sind, Bo. P. 

Hyderabad, cap, and s. Nizam*s Dominions, H, 

Hyderghar, /. Shimoga dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Hyderganj, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 



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( xliv ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



I. 

Icha, par^ Singhbhoom dis^ Chota Nagpore, B. 

Ichagar, Manbhoom dis^ Chota Nagpore, B. 

Icha^arh, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Ichak, Hazaribagh dis^ Chota Nagpore, B. 

Ichapur, Ganjam dis^ M. P. 

Ichawapur, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Ichchhamati r. 24 Pergunnahs and Nuddea dis^ B. 

Ichhapur, fairt Burdwan dis^ B. 

Ichhapur, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Ichhawar, par, Bhopal s, C. I. A. 

Ichra, Lahore dis, P. 

Indaiyangudi, Tinnevelly dis^ M. P. 

Idaiyankota, t, Madura dis^ M. P. 

IdguDJi, Kanara dis^ Bo. P. 

Idrakpur, Rungpore dis^ B. 

Idrupa, r. Berar, H. A. D. 

Igatpuri, talf Nasik dis^ Bo. P. 

Iggutappakund, h, Padinalknad /«/, Coorg, M. P. 

Iglas, s. d. Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Ikasira Mahadeo, /./. Tonk j. R. A. 

Ikauna, par, Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Ikbalpur, 24- Pergunnahs ^t>, B. 

Ikhtiyarpur, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N, W. P. 

Ikil, /ar, Gya, dis, Behar, B. 

Ikkeri, /. h, 1. Shimoga dis, Mysore /. M. P, 

Ikran, Bhurtpore s, R. A. 

Iksari, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Ila, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Ilahipur, Hooghly dis, B, 

Ilambazar, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Ilao, Broach dis, Bo. P. 

Ilayangudi, Madura dis, M. P. 

Ilkal, Kaladgi dts, Bo. P. 

Ilol, z, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Ilpur, Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 

Ilsa, r. Backergunge dis, B. 

Ilsoba, Hooghly dis, B. 

Iltafatganj, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Iluppur, Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 

Imadpur, par, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Imamgunj, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Imamwah, ca, Shikarpur dis, Sind, B o. P. 

Imratpur, /. and par, Famikhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Inayati, Kerowlee s, R. A. 

Inayatnagar, /ar. Son thai Pergunnahs </iV, Behar, B. 

Inayatpur, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Inchalkaranji, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Inchalkaranji,y?. Pandu Mewas, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Inchauli, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Inchgeri, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Indapur, ia/, Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Indargarh, Tonk s. R. A. 

Indarpat, Delhi dis, P. 

Indas, Burdwan dis, B. 

Indi, /a/, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Indore, cap, and s, (Holkar), C, I. A 

Indrai, Nasik dis, Bo. P. 

Indrana, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Indravati, r. Upper Godavari dis, C. P. 

Indrayani, r. Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Indri, Kamal dis, P. 



I. 

Indukurpet, Nellore dis, M. P, 

Indurkhi, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Indupully, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Indus, r, P. and Bo. P. 

Indwara, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Ingleshwar, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Inglun, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Ingoi* Jalaun dis, N. W, P. 

Ingotha, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Inhauna, par, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Injeram, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Intally, sud, Calcutta, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Intwa, Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Ipurupalem, porf, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Iradatnagar, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Irasakanaiknur, Madura dis, M. P. 

Iravasen, Madura dis, M. P. 

Irich, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Irikur, /. s, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Iritti, ferry, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Irpu, Kiggatnad teU, Coo^, M. P. 

Irrawaddy, r. B. B. 

Irungalur, Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 

Isagarh,^^, and dis, Gwalior s, C, I. A. 

Isakapalli, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Isakhel, Bannu dis, P. 

Isan, r. N. W. P. 

Isauli, par, Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N, W. P. 

Ishakwari, «. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Ishwaripur, fair, 24-Peigunnahs dis, B. 

Iskapalle, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Islamabad, Chittagong dis, B. 

Islamabsul, Kashmir s, P. 

Islamcarh,y/. Bahawalpur j. P. 

Islamkot, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Islamnagar, par, Budaun dis, N; W. P. 

Islampur, Patna cUs, Behar, B. 

Islampur, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Islampur, Pumeah dis, Behar B. 

Islampur, par, Rungpore dis, B. 

Islampur, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Islur, Kanara r/ij. Bo. P. 

Ismailganj, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Isparsang, Peshawar dis, P. 

Isranwah, ca, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Isri, «. Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Iswargang, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Ita, A. 

Itaunja, Lucknow dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Itaura, par, Jalaun dis, N. W. P. 

Itauwan, r. Patna dis, Behar, B, 

Itawa, t, Saugor cUs, C. P. 

Itchapur, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Itimadpur, par, Agra dis, N. W, P. 

Itimadpur. Gwalioi s, C. I. A. 

Itinda, 24-Per^nnahs dis, B. 

Itkhori, Hazanbagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Ittamakala, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Itwad, «. Pandu Mewas, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

It wan, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

lyempet, Chingleput dis, M. P. 



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( xlv ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



J. 

Jabakhali, khal, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Jabarhcra, Saharanpur dis^ N. W. P. 

Jabbar, Rawalpindi dis^ P. 

tabbarali, khai^ Noakholly dis, B. 

Jabdi, /ar, Durbhanga, dis, Bebar B. 

Jabhera, Damoh dis^ C. P. 

Jabria Bhil, Bhopal s, C. I. A. 

Jabua, ^. C. I. A. 

Jacobabad, cant^ and dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Jadabpur, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Jadhau, Jodhpore x. R. A* 

Jael, Jodhpore x. R. A. 

Jafarabad, Chumparun dis^ Behar, 6. 

Jafarabad, Upper Sind Frontier </w, Sind, Bo. P. 

Jafarabad, s» Babriawar dis^ Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Jafarband, Cachar dis^ A. 

tafarganj, Tipperah dis, B. 

Jafarganj, Fatehpur dis^ N. W. P. 

Jafarganj, Dacca dis^ B. 

Jafling, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis^ A. 

iagadsdli, f, Vizagapataro dis, M. P. 
agadhri, /. and s,d, Umballa dis^ P. 
agadishpur, Hazariba^h dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 
agai, Balasore dis^ Orissa, B. 
Jagalbet, Kanara///j, Bo. P. 
Tagalur, Chitaldroog dis^ Mysore s, M. P. 
Jagamanpur, Jalaun dis^ N. W. P. 
Jaganathraj Chuttrum, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 
Jagannath, ietftf Pooree dif, Orissa, B. 
Jagannathdighi, Tipperah, dis^ B. 
Jagannathpur, Singhbhoom dir^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Jagannathpur, Cuttack dis^ Orissa, B. * 

Jagannathpur, fair^ Lohardugga^i>, Ch-Nagpore, B. 
Jagannathpur, Sylhet dis^ A. 
Jagapati, Chumparun dis^ Behar, B. 
Jagapur, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 
Jagatballabhpur, Hooghly dis^ B. 
Jagati, Nuddea, dis^ B. 

Jagatpur Tanghan, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N.W.P. 
Jagatsingpur, /. and /.</. Cuttack dis^ Orissa, B. 
Jagburi, r. Ratnagiri dis^ Bo. P. 
Jagdalpur, Bastar s.C P. 
Jagdispur, Sultanpur dis^ Oudh, N. W. P. 
Jagdispur, Shahabad dis^ B. 

Jageshwar, cave^ Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Bebar, B. 
Jaggammapet, 2. Godavari dis, M. P. 
Jaggayapet, Kistna dis^ M. P. 
Jaggiapetta, Kistna dis^ M. P. 
Jagipura, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 
Tagjiwani, Kaladgi dit. Bo. P. 
Jagmandal, f.r, Mandla dis, C. P. 
jagmer, h, Banswara x. R. A. 
Jagnahat, Rewah /. C. I. A. 
Jagner, Agra dis^ N. W. P. 
Jagnur, Belgaum dis^ Bo. P. 
Jagraon, Ludhiana dis^ P. 
Jaguli, Nuddea dist B. 
Jaguli, 24-Pergunnahs d&V, B. 
Jaguli, Nuddea dis, B. 
tahajgarh, Hissar dis^ P. 
Jahanabad, Bareilly dis^ N. W. P. 
Jahanabad, Shahabad dis^ Behar, B. 
Jahanabad, Gya dis^ Behar, B. 
Jahanabad, Burdwan dit, B. 
Jahanabad, Fathepur <///, N. W. P. 
Jahanganj, Azamgarh dis^ N. W. P. 



Jahangira, /ar, Bhagalpur dis^ Behar, B. 
Jahangirabad, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 
Jahangirabad, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 
Jahangirpur, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 
Jahankheri, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 
Jahazpur,^?. Oodeypore s, R. A, 
Jaidebpur, Dacca dis^ B. 
Jaikistopur, Dacca dis, B. 
Jainagar, 24-Pergunnahs disf B. 
Jainagar, Mozufferpore </i>, Behar, B. 

iaini, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 
aini, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 
'ainkondasholapuram, Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 

aintia Hills, s.d, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 

aintiapur, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 

aintipur, Shahjahanpur dis, N. W. P. 

aipur, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

aipur, cant, and s,d. Lakhimpur dis, A. 

aipur, m. Jeypore s, R. A. 
Jaipur, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B, 
Jaipur, r. Vizagapatam dit, M. P. 
'airaj, m. Sirohee J. R. A. 

ais, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P, 

aisamand, /. Oodeypore x. R. A. 

aisinghnagar, Saugor dis, C. P. 

aisinghpur, Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Jait, Muttraafix, N. W. P. 
Jaitapur, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 
Jaitpur, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 
Jaitsar, Bickaneer x. R. A. 
Jaitwar, Rewah x. C. I. A. 
Jajmau, par, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 
Ja^pore, /. and s.d, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Jajpur, Oodeypore x. R. A. 
Jakaichuk, A. 

iakhali^ur, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 
akhani, r. Oodeypore x. R. A. 
~akhar, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

akhauda, Rohtak dis, P. 

akhawu, Cutch x. Kattjrwar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

akhlabandha, A. 

akhlaun, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

akhora, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

akhwara, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

akkatala, m, Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

ako, h, Simla dis, P. 

akro, /, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

ala, Mozufiferpore dis, Behar, B. 

alalabad, Afghanistan. 
Jalalabad, Farrukhabad dis, N. W. P, 
Jalalabad, Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 
^alalabad, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

alalabad, Muzaffamagar dis, N. W. P. 

alalabad, Shahjahanpur dis, N. W. P. 

alali, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

alalkhera, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

alalpor, tal, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

alalpur, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

alalpur, Gujranwala dis, P. 

alalpur, Gujrat dis, P. 

alalpur, faunpur dis, N, W. P. 

alalpur, Jhelum dis, P. 

alalpur, Mooltan dis, P. 

alalpur, par, Shahjahanpur dis, N. W. P. 

alalpur, s,d, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

alamb, Akola dis^ Berar, H. A. D. 



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( xlvi ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



J. 

Jalamutha, par^ Midnapore dis, 6. 
'alanga, par^ Balasore dis^ Orissa, B. 

alantra, z, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

alapahar, canif Darjeeling dis, B. 

alarpet, r.s. Salem dis, M. P. 

alaun, cap^ and disj N. W. P. 

aldhaka, Rungpore dis^ B. 
Jaldhaka, r. Rungpore, and Jalpaiguri dis^ B. 
Jaldi, Chittagong diSf B. 
Jalesar, t.s,d. SLudp.p, Agra dis, N. W. P. 
Jaleshwar, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 
Jaleshwari, dee/, Jessore dis, B. 
~a]gaon, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D, 

algaon, Nasik dis, Bo. P. 

algaon, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 

algaon, Wardha dis, C. P. 
^algun, Barwani s. C. I. A. 
Jalhaganw, Chumparun dis, Behar B. 
Jalhupur, par, Benares dis, N. W. P. 
Jallo, Lahore dis, P. 
Jalna, Hyderabad (Nizam's). H. 
Jalod, par, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 
jalor, Jodhpore s. R. A. 
Jalori, m. Kangra dir, P. 
Jalowali, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 
Jalpai, A, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 
Jalpaiguri, cap, cant, and dis, B. 
Jalpesh, /. and tern, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 
Jalwar, r. Patna dis, Behar, B. 
Jam, r. Chhindwara dis, C. P. 
jamadi, h. Salem dis, M. P. 

amal, Sirsa dis, P. 

amalabad, /. and m. South Canara dis, M. P. 
amali, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
amalkhera, Jeypore s, R. A. 
amalpur, Banda dis, N. W. P. 
amalpur, Burdwan dis, B. 
amalpur, t. and s,d. Mymensingh dis, B. 
amalpur, Monghyr dis, Behar B. 
amaniya, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 
amboti, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 
ambu, ca. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
ambugam, Chota Udepur x. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 
ambughora, cap, Narukot s. Panch Mahals ^iV, Bo. P. 
ambulghata, Chanda dis. C. P. 
ambur, Nanjarapatna tal, Coorg, M. P. 
ambusar, tal. Broach dis. Bo. P. 
ames and Mary, sands, Hooghly river, B. 
amgaon, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 
amgod, Dewas s, C. I. A. 
amhauli, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 
ami Masjid, sh. Tonk s. R. A. 
amira, r. Nuddea dis, B. 
] ^amjo-Tando, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Jamkhandi, s. South Maratha Agency, Bo. P. 
Jamkhed, tal, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 
Jamki, Sialkot dis, P. 
amiera, Montgomery dis, P. 
amli, Bheel Agency, C. I. A. 
ammalamadugu, tal, Cuddapah dis, M. P. 
amna, Burdwan dis, B. 

amnagar, Hallar</{V, Kattywar, Giyarat, Bo. P. 
amner, Goonah dis, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 
amner r, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 
amner, t. and tal, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 
amnotri, p.p, Garhwal dis, N. W. P. 



Jamni r. C. I. A. 
Jamni, Chanda ^ix, C. P. 
Jamnia, s. Bheel Agency, C. I. A. 
Jamod, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 
Jamooee, s,d, and r.s. Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 
Jamoona, or Jamuna r, B. 
Jamor, /./. Gya dis, Behar, B. 
Jampui, «. Hill Tipperah /. B. 

iampur, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 
a mri, x. Bhandara dis, C. P. 
J amrud, ft. Peshawar dis, P. 
Jam Shoro, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Jamtara, c.s. Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 
Jamuna, r. Gya dis, Behar, B. 
Jamuna Mukh, r. Nowgong dis, A. 
Jamunhia, r. Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Jamuni, par, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B 
'amuni, r. N. W. P. 

amunia, par, Indore s. C. I. A. 

amurki, Mymensingh dis, B. 

amwaii, r. Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 
^ anagarh, ft, Partabgarh s. R. A, 

{anai, Hooghly dis, B. 
anak Tal, Gwalior s.C.l. A. 
Janala, Chanda dis, C. P. 
Janardanpur, Midna]x>re dis, B. 
Jand, Bannu dis, P. 
Jand, Rawalpindi dis, P. 
Jandanwala, Gujrat dis, P. 
Jandanwala, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

andiala, Jullundur dis, P. 

andiala Sherkhan, Gujranwala^/i>, P. 

andialah, Amritsar dis, P. 

anephal, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

angal Mahal, t.c. Midnapore dis, B. 
Janghi, Cutchj. Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 
Jangipur, /. and par, Nuddea dis, B. 
Jangrapara, A. 

Janthang, saltmine, Nowgong dis, A. 

Janibwa, ca, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
ani Dongar, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 
Jani-Khel, Bannu dis, P. 
Janipur, Nuddea dis, B. 
Janjgir, Bilaspur //;>, C. P. 
Janji, r. Sibsagar dis, A. 
Janjira, s. Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 
Jankia, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 
Jankinagai, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

ansath, Muzaflamagar dis, N. W. P. 

ant, Gurgaon dis, P. 

anumpet, Hyderabad (Nizam's), H, 

anuna, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

anyala, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

aora, s, C. I. A. 

apla,/flr, Gya dis, Behar, B, 
Tara, /.r. Kamrup dis, A. 
Jara, Midnapore dis, B. 
Jarada, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
"arain, r. Patna dis, Behar, B. 

arbari, Umballa dis, P. 

archa, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

arel, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

areshwar, Jhalawad dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

argaji, A. Oodeypore s. R. A. 

ana, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Jariari, Rewah s, C. I. A, 



Digitized by 



Google 



( xlvii ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



J. 



Jaridih, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Jaripada, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 
Tanya, Hamirpur dis, N. W, P. 
Jarra,/a>', Gya dtSf Behar, B. 
Jarra, par, Indore s. G. I. A. 
Janid, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 
Jarwal, Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Jasana, Bickaneer s, R. A. 

iasdao, x. and /«/, Kattywar dis, Gujarat, Bo. P. 
ashpur, s, Ghota-Nagpore, B. 
aso, J*. Bundelkhand, G. I. A. 
asol, Jodhpore s. R. A. 
asor, Palanpar s, Kattywar, Gujarat Bo. P. 
Jaspur, Banda dis, N. W. P. 
Jaspur, Tarai dis, N. W. P. 
Jasra, AUahabad dis, N. W. P. 
Jasrana, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 
Jasrasar, Bickaneer s, R. A. 
Jasrota,y. Kashmir s, P. 
Jassakhera, Ajmere dif, R. A. 
Jaswan Dun, valUy, Hoshiarpur dif, P. 
taswantnagar, Etawah dis, N. W. P. 
tat, Gwalior s, G. I. A. 
Jatari, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 
Jatepur, par, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 
Jateshwar, h. Guttack dis, Orissa, B. 
lath, s. Satara dis. Bo. P. 
Jati, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
tati, ial, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Jating, h, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Jatinga, r, Gachar dis, A. 
Jatli, Rawalpindi dis, P. 
Jatoi Muzaffargarh dis, P. 
Jatrapur, Rungpore dis, B. 
jatta, Dcra Ismail Khan dis, P. 
tatusana, Gurgaon dis, P. 
tatwara, Jejrpore s. R. A. 
taula Baleshwar, Ahmednagar dis, Bo. P. 
Jauli, tal, Satara dis. Bo. P. 
Jauli Jansath, par, Muzaffamagar dis^ N. W. P. 
Jaunpur, cap, and dis, N. W. P. 
Jaunra, Gwalior j. G. I. A. 

Jaunsar Bawar, s.d, Dehra Dun dis, N. W. P. 
aurasi, Saharanpur </f x, N. W. P. 
Jauri, Gurgaon dis, P. 
Javagal, tern, Kadur dis, Mysore s» M. P. 
Javaji Konda, h. Salem dis, M. P. 
Jawad, ft, Gwalior s, G. I. A. 
Jawaja, Aimere dis, R. A. 
Jawalamukhi, /./. Kangra dis, P. 
Jawalka, Basim dis, Berar, H. A. D. 
Jawalpur, t. and par, Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 
Jawar, h, Oodeypore s. R. A. 
jawar, par, Bhopal j. G. I. A. 
Jawari, Tonk s, R. A. 
Jawasia, Western Malwa Agency, G. I. A. 

Jawhar, j. Thana dis. Bo. P. 
ayagarh, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 
Jayamangali, r. Tumkur dis, Mysore, x. M. P. 
Jayankondacholapuram, Trichinopoly ^ir, M. .P 
Jayanti, r. Sonthal Pergunnahs dts, Behar, B. 
Jayapur, pat, Guttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Jayatapur, It. house, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 
Jaykhera, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 
Jaynagar, 24-Pcrgunnahs dis, B. 
Jaynagar, par, Manbhoom dis, Ghota-Nagpore, B. 



Jaypanda, r. Bankoora dis, B. 

Jaypur, par, Manbhoom dis, Ghota-Nagpore, B. 

jaypur, Bankoora dis, B. 

Jaypur, Bogra dis, B. 

Jaypur, Manbhoom dis, Ghota-Nagpore, B. 

Jayragi, Lohardugga dis, Ghota-Nagpore, B. 

Jayrampur, Nuddea dis, B. 

Jaytapur, r, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Jaytara,^r, Manbhoom dis, Ghota-Nagpore, B. 

Jeddya Gowden, h. South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Jehanabad, s,d, Burdwan dis, B. 

Jehanabad, s.d. Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Jehuli, Ghumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Jejuri, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Jelalabad, t, and dis, Afghanistan. 

IJelinghee, r. Nuddea ^w, B. 
Jelinghee, Moorshedabad dis, B. 
Jellasore, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 
emalavoi, h. Kistna dis, M. P. 
embukheshwaram, sh, Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 
enapur, Guttack dis, Orissa, B. 
enkalpetta, h. Hassan dis, Mysore x. M. P. 
Jerimalla, Bellary dis, M. P. 
Jerruck, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Jesar, «. Pandu Mewrs x. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 
Jessore, cap, and dis. B. 
'etaran, Jodhpore x. R. A. 

ethari, par, bhopal s. G. I. A. 

etpur, Ghota Udepur s. Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

etpur, tal, Kattywar dis, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

feur, Ahmednagar dis. Bio. P. 

ieur, Sholapur dis. Bo. P. 
^ewan, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 
Jewar, /. and/ar, Bulandshahr </i.f, N. W. P. 
Teypore, cap, and s. R. A. 

[eypore, z. Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

feysulmere, cap, and s. R. A. 

habua, s. G. I. A. 
;hadar, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 
Jhagaria, Rajpipla s, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 
Jhajhar, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 
Jhajja, P. 

Jhajjar, Rohtak dis, P. 
thak, Ajmere dis, R. A. 
Jhakraoda, G. I. A. 

Jhalakati, Backergunge dis, B. 
Jhalawad, dis, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 
Jhalda,/ar, Manbhoom dis, Ghota-Nagpore, B. 
Jhalera, Bhopal s. G. I. A. 
Jhali, Rewah s. G. I. A. 
Jhalki, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 
Jhallawar, s. R. A. 
Jhalod, Panch Mahals dis. Bo. P. 
Jhalokhar, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 
Jhalotar, Unao dts, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Jhalrapatan, cap., Jhalawar s, R. A. 
thalu, Bijnor du, N. W. P. 
Jhaluachara, A. 
thanda, Gurdaspur dis, P. 
Jhandaha, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 
Jhang, ccip, and dis, P. 

Jhangal, p.p. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Jhanidah, t. and s. d. Jessore dis, B. 
Jhanjhana t. and/ar, Muzaffamagar dis, N. W- P. 
Jhanjharpur, Mozufferpore </«>, Behar, B. 
Jhanpa, Jessore dis, B. 



Digitized by 



Google 



( xlviii ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



J. 



ihansi, canif cap, and dis^ N. W. P. 
haosi, Nawabad. cap, Jhansi dis, N, W. P. 
hapan, Tonk s, R. A. 
harar Ghat, ferry, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 
Jhargrram, Midna|x>rc dis, B. 
Jharapapra, s. Chanda dit, C. P. 
Tharhi, r, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 
Jhari Garkhari, Dang x. Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 
Jharia, par, Manbhoom cUs, Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Tharpat, Chanda fl'w, C. P. 
Jharta, Balasorc dis, Orissa, B. 
Jhawarian, Shahpur dis, P. 
Jhelum, cant, cap, r. and dis, P. 
jhenidah. s,d. Jessore dis, B. 
Jhiko, h. Jodhpore s, R. A. 
Jhil, Kamal dis, P. 

Jhilka-bara, marsh, Bhartpore s. R. A. 
Thilmila, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 
J him. r. Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 
Jhimpir, Karachi di^, Sind, Bo. P. 

Jhinai r. Dacca dis, B. 
hinjhak, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 
Jhinjuwara, Jhallawad dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 
Jhira r, Sambalpur dis, C. P. 
Jhiri, r. Cachar dis, A. 
Jhiri, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 
Jhodga, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 
Jhok Bodo, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 
Jhol, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Jhoro, dis, Sirohee s. R. A. 
Jhugga-ki-baori, /./. Jeypore /. R. A. 
Jhunjhnu, Sheikhawati, Je3rpore x. R. A. 
Jhusi, AUahabad dU, N. W. P. 
Jia Dhaneshwari, r, Danang dis, A. 
Jiaganj, Moorshedabad dis, 6. 
Jia Sindu, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 
Jibannagar, Nuddea dis, B. 
Jigargunda, Bastar, x. C. P. 
Jigni,y. Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 
Jigni, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 
Jimukti r. Bellary dis, M. P. 
tinagi-halla, r. Mysore s. M. P. 
Jinari, r. Goalpara dis, A. 
Jind s. P. 

Jind Pir, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Jindoli, h, Oodeypore x. R. A« 
Jinjira, port. Bo. P. 
Jinjiram, r. Goalpara cUs, A. 
Jira, duar, Garo Hills dis. A, 
Jiral, Sankhera Mewas s, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 
Jiran, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 
Jirang, x. Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 
Jirat, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 
Jiri, r. Naga Hills dis, A. 
Jirighat, A. 

Jirota, dis, Kerawlee x. R. A. 
tisod, /./. Jeypore x. R. A. 
Jithwara, Partabgarh dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Jiudharchaunr, btel, Durbhunga dis, Behaz, B. 
Jiwachh, r. Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 



J. 

{oari, Rajshahye (&s, B. 
obat, X. C. I. A. 
Tobner, Je3rpore x. R. A. 

[obra, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

odh, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

odhka, Sirsa dis, P. 

[odhpore x. R. A. 

fodhpur, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Gujaiat, Bo. P» 

[oga ; wat€ffaU Shimoga dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

[ogeswar ; Hazaribagh dis, Chota-NagporCy B. 

ogewala, Ferozepore, dit, P. 

ogigopha, Goalpara dis, A. 

[ogigarh, yS*. and i. Gwalior x. C. I. A. 
Johi, Karachi dis, Sind^ Bo. P. 
Johila, r. Rewah x, C. I. A. 

Ioinshar, Dacca dis, B. 
ojri, r, Jodhpore x. R. A. 
olakab Mallai, h, Malabar dis, M. P. 
ollarpet, Salem dis, M. P. 
TomamaUe, h, Coorg, M. P. 
Jonha, Lohaxdugga <Us, Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Jonk, r. Raipur dis, C. P. 
Jonkar, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 
Jorarganj, Noakholly dis, B. 
Jorbuigala, Daijeeling clis, B. 
Jorhat, s,d, Sibsagar dis, A. 
Jorya, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Ba P. 
Joshimath,. Garhwal //fx, N. W. P. 
tatampati, z, Coimbatore ^/ix, M. P. 
Jotdar, e, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Jowai, X. d, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 
Towaro, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

[ubbal, X. P. 

[ubbulpore, cant, and dis, C. P. 

uda, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

u|[iadhala, h, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

[mn Mataji, /./. Jeypore x. R. A. 

[uihar, Damoh dis, C. P. 

ulcchi, Rewah x. C. I. A. 

ulaguri, fair, Nowgong dis, A. 

ullundnr, ccutt, and dis, P. 

[ullundur Doab, n.d.c, P. 

ulwana, Barwani x. C. I. A. 

umkha, z. Pandu Mewas x. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

[ummoo, Kashmir x. Punjab. 

umna, r. N. W. P. 

unagarh, x. Sorath dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

ungshahi, Karachi dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

unprpore, s,d. Moorshedabad dis, B, 

uniadah, Nuddea </fx, B. 

funian, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

unnar, tal, Poona dit. Bo. P. 

unona, Chanda dis, C. P. 

xmpntfair, Midnapore dis, B. 

un, r. A, 

ussakhera, Ajmere^, R. A. 

utogh, cant, Simla dis, P. 

walangi, r, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

wolibuida, Midnapore <Ax, B. 



Digitized by 



Google 



( xllx ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



K. 



Kab, r. Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Kabada, /a/, Tumkur diSf Mysore, s. M. P. 

Kabar, par^ Gya dis^ Behar, B, 

Kabar, /. Mongh]rr dif, B. 

Kabbaldurga, A. Mysore s, M. P. 

Kabbinad, Shimoga dis^ Mysore, x. M. P. 

Kabilpur, Rungpore dis^ B. 

Kabir, Montgomery dis^ P. 

Kabirpur, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kabirwala, Mooltan dis P. 

Kabrai, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Kabul, cap, and r, Afghanistan. 

Kachai, Kohat dit, P. 

KachaKhuh, Mooltan, dit^ P. 

Kachaoda, Gwalior f. C. I. A. 

Kachaura, Etawah dis^ N. W. P. 

Kacbfaral, A. 

Kachhalan, /. Chittagong Hil] Tracts dis, B. 

Kachhalan, TIang, h, Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Kachhandan,/ar. Hardoi </i>, Oudh, N. VV. P. 

Kachhi Baroda, €. Bheel Agency, C. I. A. 

Kachhona, Hardoi dis, Ottdh, N. W. P. 

Kachi, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kachla, Budaon dis, N. W. P. 

Kachneha, Jhansi dis, N, W. P. 

Kachner Sarai, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Kachna, Jessore dis, B. 

Kachuya, r. A. 

Kachwa, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P, 

Kada, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Kadaba, tal, Tumkur dit, Mysore s. M. P. 

Xadaiyur, «. Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 

Kadaladi, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Kadamba, r, Mysore J. M. P. 

Kadambatur, Chingleput dis, M. P. 

Kadambur, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Kadamgachhi, 24-Pergunnahs dis B. 

Kadamrasul, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kadam, r. Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo P. 

Kad^na, r. Mosuflcrpore dis, Behar, B. 

Kadarma, Hazaribagn dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kadatur, «. Salem dis, M. P. 

Kadaura, Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Kadavur, z. Trichinopoly dit, M. P. 

Kadayam, Tinnevelly a^w, M. P. 

Kaddayanallur, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Kadgaon, Kolhapur, s. Bo. P. 

Kadcodi, Bangalore dis, Mysore, s, M. P. 

Kadnan, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kadi, Baroda s, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Kadian, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Kadihati, 24-Pergunnahs dit, B. 

Kadipur, s.d. Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kadirabad, Gujarat dis, P. 

Kadirganj, Etah, dis, N. W. P. 

Kadirpur, Jhang dts, P. 

Kadin, tal, Cuddapah, dis, M. P. 

Kadra, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Kadur, cap, and dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Kadus, Poona dis, 60. P. 

Kadwa, /. s.d. znd par, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Kadwa, r. Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Kadwal, Chota-Udepur s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Kadyatnad, Aod, Padinalknad ial, Coorg, M. P. 

Kaema, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kafirkot, m. Bannu dis, P. 



K. 



Kagal,^?. Kolhapur J. Bo. P. 

Kagaraul, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Kaggodlnad, had, Mercara /^/, Coorg, M. P. 

Kagmari, pdr, Mymensingh dis^ B. 

Kagnelli, Dharwar^ij, Bo. P. 

Kagwad, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Kahan, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kahi, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kahlur, (Bilaspur) s, P. 

Kahngarh, Amritsar dis, P. 

Kahnuwan, /. Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Kahror, Mooltan dis, P. 

Kahtan, Tonk /. R. A. 

Kahuta, /. and s.d, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Kaidala, Chitaldroog dis, Mysore /. M. P. 

Kaigram, Burdwan^tV, B. 

Kaikalur, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Kailaji, /./. Kerowlee s. R. A. 

Kailang, Kangra dis, P. 

Kailashar, x, d. Hill Tipperah, /. B. 

Kaim, Jhang dis, P. 

Kaimankolam, /. Cochin x. M. P. 

Kaimganj, Farrukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Kaimganj, Farukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Kaimkolam, /. Travancore, f. M. P, 

Kaimpur, Bahawalpur s, P. 

Kaimur, m.r. Rewah s. C. I. A. 

Kaimuri, Jubbulpore dit, C. P. 

Kainda Tan, A, Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Kainjuwa, A, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Kain Tan, ^, Chittajgong Hill Tracts dit, B. 

Kaipara, Cuttack dis, Oriasa, B. 

Kaira, oap, and dis. Bo. P. 

Kairana, par, Muzafiamagar dis, N. W. P. 

Kairi, Banda dis, N. wTP. 

Kairu, Hissar dis, P. 

Kaisarganj, Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W, P. 

Kaisla, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Kaisar-jo-Tando, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kaitala, Tipperah dis, B. 

Kaitha, Hamirpur dit, N. W. P. 

Kaithal, s.d, Karnal dis, P. 

Kaiti, Burdwan dis, B. 

Kaiti, Nilgiri dit, M. P. 

Kajai, bed, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Kaittar, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Kajgaon, Khandesh i//>. Bo. P. 

Kajibacha, r. Jessore dis, B, 

Kajiranga, Sylhet dis, A. 

Kajirda, k, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Kajirda, g/ta/, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Kajirhat, Rungpore dis, B, 

Kajlagarh, Midnapore dis, B. 

Kajn, par, Monghyrdis, Behar, B. 

Kakai, r. A. 

Kakand, r, Bhurtpore j. R. A. 

Kakar, /a/, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kakarbai, Jhansi //«, N. W. P. 

Kakarkhen, e. Bhopal s. C. I. A. 

Kakaikhila, Baria s. Rewa Kanta, Gujarat, 60. P. 

Kakatpur, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Kakaun, Cawnpore, dis, N. W. P. 

Kak Donga, A. 

Kakhandki, Kaladgi dit. Bo. P. 

Kakharipara, Goalpara dis, A. 

Kakhri, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 



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( 1 ) 



Alphabetical Index, 



K. 

Kakhri, r. Khasi and Taintia HilU dis, A. 

Kakila, r. A. 

Kakina, Rungpore dist E. 

Kakkarhatti, Simla diSy P. 

Kako, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Kakol, r, Shikarpur dis, Smd, Bo. P. 

Kakori, par, Lucknow dis, Oodh, N. W. P. 

Kakowari, /. Thar and Parkar dii, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kakpara, Singhbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kakrachor, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Kakradaha, khal^ Rajshahye dis^ B. 

Kakrala, Budaun dif, N. W. P. 

Kaksa, Burdwan dir, B. 

Kaktigaon, A. 

Kakwagiri^ Garo Hills dis, A. 

Kal, r. Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Kala, r. A. 

Kalabagh, Bannu diff P. 

Kalacaud, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Kaladarni, r. Goalpara dts, A. 

Kaladhungi, Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Kaladgi, cap, and dis. Bo. P. 

Kalagachhia, or Diamond Harbour, 24-Pergh5s B. 

Kalagatta, TumkurflVx, Mysore r. M. P. 

Kalahandi, or Karond s, ^mbalpor dis, C. P. 

Kalahasti, z. North Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Kalai, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Kalaigaon, Darrang^ij-, A. 

Kalain, Cachar</wv A. 

Kalakad, Tinnevelly //w, M. P. 

Kalakar, L Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kalakot, p.h.i. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kalakurchi, tal, South Arcot dit, M. P. 

Kalakusi, r. Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Kalalia, h. Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Kalalwala, Sialkot dh, P. 

Kalam, Rajshahye </2>, B. 

Kalamb, Wun </i>, Berar, H. A. D. 

Kalanaur, Gurdaspur </2j, P. 

Kalanaur, Rohtak dis, P. 

Kalang, r. Nowgong dis, A. 

Kalanidhigad, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Kalapadar, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Kalaroa, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Kalas, Dharwar dir. Bo. P. 

Kalasa, tern, Kadur dis, Mysore j. M. P. 

Kalasaparvata, h. Kadur dis, Mysore /. M. P. 

Kala Shahkaku, Lahore dis, P. 

Kalashi, Shimoga dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Kalasi, r. A. 

Kalaskati, Backergunge dis, B. 

Kalasmuhan, p.p. Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kalatiya, Dacca dis, B. 

Kalavaganga, r. North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Kalavai, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Kalavara-betta or Skandagiri, h, Mysore s. M. P. 

Kal Bhairon, /./. Benares dis, N. W. P, 

Kaldiva, r. Kamrup dis, A. 

Kaleji, beel, Jessore dis, B. 

KaJengode, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Kalerro, h. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo P. 

Kalesar,/.r. Umballa dis, P. 

Kalghatgi, tal, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Kalha, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Kalhali, Bangalore dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Kalhatti, falU, Nilgiri dis, M. P. 



K. 

Kali, f . Kumool dif, M. P. 

Kali, r. N. W. P. 

KaVia, /air, 24-Pergunnahs dVx, B. 

Kaliabar, Nowgong dit, A. 

KallaChak, Maldab, dis, B. 

Kaliaganj Purneah dis, Behar, B. 

Kaliaganj, Dinagepore ^li, B. 

Kaliakheri, /ar, Bhopal ./. C. I. A. 

Kaliakheri, Hosbangabad, dis, C. P. 

Kaliana, Kamal dis, P. 

Kaliani, r. Nowgong dis, A. 

Kalianpur, s.d. Fatehpur^/w, N. W. P. 

Kali Baori, e C I. A. 

Kalibhanj, i. Cuttack dis, Orisss, B. 

Kalibhit,/.r. Hosbangabad dis, C. P. 

Kalidohar, Ghat, Rnngpore dis, B. 

Kaliganj, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Kaliganj, Dacca dis, B. 

Kaliganj, 24-Pergunnahs </i>, B. 

Kaliganp;, Backeigunge dis, B. 

Kaliganj, Jessore dis, B. 

Kaligang, Runepore dis, B» 

Kaliganj, Nuddea dis, B. 

Kaligaon Kalisafa par, Rajshahye fffs, 6. 

Kalighat, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Kalijai, A. Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Kalijori, Par, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Kalijra, banswara s. R. A. 

Kalikapur, Burdwan dis, B. 

Kalikapur, Singhbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Kalikatala, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Kalikot, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Kali Kumaun, par, Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Kalinadi, r, Kanara dir, Bo. P. 

Kalinadi, r. Rajshahye and 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Kalinagar, /. Midnapore dzs, B. 

Kalindi, r. 24-Pergunnahs and Rajshahye dis, B. 

Kalindi Balsai, par, Midnapore dis, B. 

Kalindri, r. Maldah dis, B. 

Kalinga, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Kalingapatam, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Kalingiya, A, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Kalinjar,}?. and p.p. Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Kalinpon, c.s. Darjeeling dis, B. 

Kalipit, par, Rajgarh /. C. I. A. 

Kali Sindh, r. Tonk s. R. A. 

Kaliya, Jalaun dir, N. W. P. 

Kaliyan, Shahjahanpur, dis, N. W. P. 

Kaljani, r, Cooch Behar and Jalpaiguri dir, B. 

Kalka, Simla dis P. 

Kal kala, f.s. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kalkaliya, r. A. 

Kalkeri, Kaladgi, dis. Bo. P. 

Kalladakurchi, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Kallakurchi, /. and /«/, South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Kallar, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Kallarkahar, /. Jhelum dis, P. 

Kallarkot, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Kaller, Upper Godavari dis, C. P. 

KaUigai, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Kalligudi, r, s. Madura dis, M. P. 

Kallikot, z. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Kallur, South Canara dis, M. P. 

Kallurkot, Dera Ismail Khan dif, P. 

Kalluwala, Mooltan dis, P. 

Kalmeshwar, Nagpur dis, C, P. 



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{ H ) 
Alphabetioal Index 



Kalmijor, /if>, Midnapore </ij, B. 

Kaini, r, Sylhet dis, A. 

Kalohi, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo P. 

Kalol, Baioda j. Bo. P. 

Kalol, Panch Mahals dit, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Kalolu, «. Mewas s. Rewa Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Kalolu Mokanu «. Mewas s, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Kalomel, Midnapore rtV/, B. 

Kalpatty, Malabar, dis^ M. P. 

Kalpi, t, and par^ Jalaun </w, N. W. P. 

Kalra, Gujarat dis, P. 

Kalrayan Malai A, Salem dis^ M. P. 

Kal5u, Dehra Dun dit, N. W. P. 

Kalsia, s, P. 

Kalsubai, Ahmednagar <///, Bo, P. 

Kalsubai, Nasik dis^ Bo. P. 

KalsuU, Sawant Wari x. Bo. P. 

Kaltigudda, Kanara </t>, Bo, P. 

Kalu, r, Garo Hills <//>, A. 

Kalu, r, Thana ^/i>, Bo. P. 

Kalubhar, Hallar dis Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Kaluk, diif Jejrporc j. R. A. 

Kaluhera, c. Western Malwa Agency, C. I. A. 

Kalumar, h, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Kalupol, Nuddea dis, B. 

Kalva, Kumool dit, M. P. 

Kalva, r. Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Kalwan, /. and tal, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Kalyan, /. and tal, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Kalyandrug, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Kalyanganj, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Kalyani, r. Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kalyanroal, par, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kalyanpura, Bheel Agency, C. I. A. 

Kalyanpur Kuwari, psir, Sarun dis, Behar. B. 
Kalyan Ralji, sh, Tonk s. R. A. 
Kalyatha, Indore s. C, I. A. 
Kama, Bhurtpore s, R. A. 
Kama, Thayetmyo dis, B. B. 
Kamakhya, h. and Um, Kamnip dis, A. 
Kamaksha, h. A. 
Kamalapur, Bellary dis, M. P. 
Kamalapuram, r. s, Cuddapah dis, M. P. 
Kamalasthan p,p, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 
Kamaldero, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Kamalganj, Farmkhabad dis, N. W. P. 
Kamalgani, ru, C. I. A. 
Kamaleani, Sylhet dis, A. 
Kamalia, Montgomery dis, P 
Kamalnath, k, Oodeypore j*. R. A. 
Kamalpur, 4. Bhopal s, C. I. A. 
Kamalpur, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 
Kamalpur, Kamnip dis, A. 
Kaman, Thana dis, Bo. P. 
Kaman or Kamhan, dis, Bhurtpore /. R. A. 
Kamardachor, /ar, Orissa, B. 
Kamardanga, 24-Pereunnahs dis, B. 
Kamargachi or Sija, Hooghly dis, B. 
Kamargaon, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 
Kamargaon, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 
Kamargaon, Sibsagar dis, A. 
Kamaijani, Rungpore dis, B. 
Kamarmashani, Bannu dis, P. 
Kamarpota, A. 

Kamasamodrftm, r. s. North A root dis, M. P. 
Kamasin , / and x. d, Banda dis, N. W. P. 



K. 

Kamatapur, Cooch Behar s. B. 

Kamatgi, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Kambaincllur, ». Salem dis^ M. P. 

Kamban or Kaman, dis, Bhurtpore s, R. A. 

Kambar, tal, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kambhu, h, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo, P. 

Kambra, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Kamdol, beel, Maldah dis, B. 

Kamen, r. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Kamil Laghari, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kamin r. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Kamla, r. Durbhunga cUs, Behar, B. 

Kamlabari, A. 

Kamona, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Kamonke, Giiiranwala dis, P. 

Kampil,/ftr, Farrukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Kampli, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Kampta, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Kamtara-nala/r. Raipur dis, C. P. 

Kamptee, cant, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Kamruddinnagar,Meerut dis, N. W, P. 

Kamrup, dis, A. 

Kamsoli s. Sankhera Mewas s, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Kamta Rajaula, Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Kamtaul, Durbhunga dis^ Behar B. 

Kamtha, s. Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Kamuti, Madura dis, M. P. 

Kan, n Gwalior j. C. I. A. 

Kanagur, h. Shahabad dis, Behar B. 

Kanahra, ft, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Blanaigiri,/?. Nellore </«>, M. P. 

Kanaipur, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Kanaisar, t,c, Midnapore dis, B. 

Kanaka, h, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kanakacha, Lahore dis, P. 

Kanamari, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Kanar, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Kanar, /ar, Jalaun dis, N. W. P. 

Kanara, cap, and dis. Bo. P. 

Kanara (Canara) South, dis, M. P. 

Kanarak, /. Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Kanash, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Kanasi, par, Nassik dis. Bo. P. 

Kanaud, Patiala s. P. 

Kanauj, /. and par, Farrukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Kanauta, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Kanchadia, Dacca dis, B. 

Kanchametia, r. Mymensingh dis, B. 

Kanchana, h, Sonthal Pcr^unnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Kanchannagar, Burdwan dis, B. 

Kanchanpur, Rewah, i. C. I. A. 

Kanchausi, Etawah dis, N. W. P. 

Kanchikhajida, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kanchili, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Kanchinjanga, peak, Sikkim s, B. 

Kanchipur, Chmgleput dis, M. P. 

Kanchrapara, 24-Perguunahs dis, B. 

Kandahar, Afghanistan. 

Kandapur, tal. South Canara dis^ M. P. 

Kandara, Burdwan dis, B. 

Kandara, s,d, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Kandarki, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 

Kandeli, Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

Kandgaon, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Kandhaula, Umballa dis, P. 

Kandhla, par, Muzafiiumagar dis, N. W. P. 



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( Hi ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



K. 

Kandi, /. and s.d. Moorshedabad dit^ 6. 

Kandiaro, tal^ Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kandili, Narsinghpur dis^ C. P. 

Kandiwal, Jhang dts, P. 

Kandkot, Upper Sind Frontier dis^ Sind, 60. P. 

Kandukur, /. and /a/, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Kandwa or Dahaara, r, Kheri dis^ Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kaneewara, Seoni dis^ C. P. 

Kanganpur, Lahore (Us, P. 

Kangayam, Coimbatore dis^ M. P. 

Kangniwala, Gujranwala dis^ P. 

Kangori Killa, Kolaba dis^ Bo. P. 

Kangra, ft, and dis^ B. . 

Kangundi, «. North Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Kangyam, Coimbatore dis^ M. P. 

Kanhachati, Hazaribagh dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kanhan, r, Nagpur dis^ C. P. 

Kanhar, r. N. W. P. 

Kanhaigaon, z, Bhandara ditt C. P. 

Kanhauli, /ar, Mozufferpore dis^ Behar, B. 

Kanheri. h, Bhandara dts, C. P. 

Kanheri, Thana dis^ Bo. P. 

Kanhiwara, Seoni dis^ C. P. 

Kanhur, Ahmednagar dis^ Bo. P. 

Kani, r, Gwalior r. C. I. A. 

Kanigiri, /. and /a/, Nellore dis^ M. P. 

Kanihari, Mymensingh dh^ B. 

Kanika, t,s. Cut tack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kaniyambad, North Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Kanjalia, c,s, Daijeeling dif, B. 

Kanjarpalli, Travankor s, M. P. 

Kanjarra, /ar, Indore x. C. I. A. 

Kaniia,^. Saugor ^t>, C. P. 

Kanjikovil, Coimbatore diSy M. P. 

Kanjri, Cawnpore dis^ N. W. P. 

Kankabati, Midnapore dis^ B. 

Kankai, r. Pumeah dis^ Behar, B. 

Kankanhalli, Bangalore dis^ Mysore, M. P. 

Kankarkhera, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Kankawli, Ratnagiri eUs^ Bo. P. 

Kankeli, f,s. Raipur dis, C. P. 

Kanker, s, Raipur dis^ C. P. 

Kankhal, Saharunpur dh, N. W. P. 

Kankiburi, h, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kankjaul, par, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Kankrakho, ravim, C. I. A. 

Kankrej, /./. C. I. A. 

Kankrej, Radhanpur x. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Kankroli, /. Oodeypore s. R. A. 

Kankuppa, fai, Chitaldroog dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Kannad, Hyderabad, (Nizams.) 

Kannada, Vizagapatam di?, M. P. 

Kannankurchi, z, Salem dit, M. P. 

Kannee, Toungngoo dis, B. B. 

Kannivadi, s. Madura dis, M. P. 

Kanoung, Henzada dis, B. B. 

Kansa, r, A. 

Kansai, r. Midnapore and Manbhoom dis, B. 

Kansaipar, par, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kansan, r. Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Kansat, Maldah dis, B. 

Kansbans, r. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kansho, bee/, Rajshahye r//>, B. 

Kant, Shahjahanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Kanta, Beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Kantabaria, fair Bnrdwan dis, B. 



K. 

Kanth, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 

Eantabia, deei, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Kantal, /. Kashmir s, P. 

Eantalia, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Kantaltala, 24- Pergunnahs //i>, B. 

Kantaphor, par, Indore s^ C. I. A. 

Kantapukur, ca, Midnapore dis, B. 

Kantha, Unao dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kanthal, Rajpipla s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Eanthalpara, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Kanthi, Cutch s. Bo. P. 

Kanti, Mozufferpore dis, Bdiar, B. 

Kanti, r. P. 

Kantilo, Orissa States, B. 

Kantit, par, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Kanu-Junction, r,s, Burdwan dis, B, 

Kanuparti, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Kanur, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Kanur, Jeysulmeer s. R. A. 

Eanwan, C. I. A. 

Kanyagir, A, Jodhpore s. R. A. 

Xanyagiri, /a/, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Kanyikod, r. s, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Kanzam, p, and A. Kangra dis, P. 

Kapadwanj, t and /a/, Kaira dis. Bo. P. 

Kapaldhara Kund, r. Tonk s, R. A. 

Kapaldurga, //. Bangalore dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Kapaigadi, A, Singhbboom dis, Chota-Nagpor, B. 

Kapasia, Dacca dis, B. 

Kaphala, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kapila or Kapini r. Mysore s. M. P. 

Kapilas, A, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kapileshwar, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kapileshwarpur, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Kapileshwarsthan, /. /. Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Kapili, r. Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 

Kapilmuni, /air, Jessore dis, B. 

Kapini or Kapila, r, Mysore s, M. P. 

Kapni, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kapotakha, r, 24-Pergunnahs and Jessore dis, B. 

Kappatguddj Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Kapsi, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Kapsi, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Kaptai, Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Kapurthala, cap, and s, P. 

Kapus Talni, Ellichpur dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Kara, Ahmednagar ^tV, Bo. P. 

Xarabgaon, AksUkotx. Bo. P. 

Karachi or Kurrachee, cap, and dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Karachmaria, Rajshahye dis, B. ' 

Karad, r, Panch Mahals dis. Bo. P. 

Karad, /. and /«/, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Karahi, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Karai, r. Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Karaibari, /, r. Garo Hills dis, A. 

Karaibaii, Rungpore dis, B. 

Karaibari, Goal para dis, A. 

Earaichuti, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Karaikudi, Madura tAs, M. P. 

Karaimadai, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Karaipatiyar, r. Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Karajgaon, Ellichpur dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Karajgi, /a/, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Karakat, Taunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Karali, Chota Udepur s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Karali, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 



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( Hii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



K. 

Karam, r, C. I. A. 

Karamadii Coimbatore dis^ M. P. 

Karamanayar, r. TiDnevelly dis^ M. P. 

Karambaldoho, r. Kolaba dis^ Bo. P. 

Karam Khan Jawali, Hyderabad dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Kanunnasa, r. Shahabad dif» Behar, 6. 

Karampudi, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Karampur, Upper Sind Frontier ///>, Sind, Bo. P. 

Karana, s. Balasinor x. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Karanda, Ghazipur dif, N. W. P. 

Karangapalli, Travancore s, M. P. 

Karangiya, r. A. 

Karanguli, Chinglepnt </<>, M. P. 

Karanja, Amraoti ais^ Berar, H. A. D. 

Karanja, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Karanja, Wardha</«>, C. P. 

Karanjadia, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Karanjali, Peint x. Bo. P. 

Karanjgaon, Poona dit. Bo. P. 

Karanjgawhan, Nasik dis. Bo. P, 

Karanpura, par, Hazaribagh dit, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Karanth, Shahabad dis, Behar. B. 

Karanthi, h, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Karaigaon, z, Bhandara dis^ C. P. 

Karan, par, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Karasgaon, Ellichpur dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Karatigaon, A. 

Karatoa, r. Rungpore, Bogra and Jalpaiguri dis^ B. 

Karaudia, e, Indore s. C. I. A. 

Karauli, Narsinghpur dif, C. P. 

Karchana, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Kardia, h, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kareh, r. Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Karekalgudda, h. Tumkur dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Karepathar, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Karchana, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Kargod, Bellary dit, M. P. 

Kareun, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Karha, r. Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Karhal, s.d. Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Karhans, Kamal dis, P. 

Karharbari, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Karhia, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Karianwala, Gujrat dis, P. 

Karidha, fair, BeerLhoom dis, B. 

Karigatta, h. Mysore dit, Mysore x. M. P. 

Karikal, French settlement, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Karikalgudda, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Karimganj, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Karimganj, Sylhet/^, A. 

Karimkluu), Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Karimpur, Nuddea dis, B. 

Karimul, /ar, Cuttack dis, Orisssa, B. 

Karinja, Omraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Kari Thul, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kaijan, r. Rewa Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Kaijat, tal, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Kaijat, ia(, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Karkal, South Canara dis, M. P. 

Karkam, Sholapur dis. Bo. P. 

Karkara, r. Raipur dit, C. P. 

Karkari, r. Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, 6. 

Karkul, South Canara dis,U. P. 

Karkur, /. Malabar dis, M. P. 

Karla, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Karli, t€m^ Poona dis. Bo. P. 



K. 

Karli, Sawant Wari /. Bo. P. 

Karmabai, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Karmala, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Karmala, tal, Sholapur dis. Bo. P. 

Karmatar, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Karmnasa, r. N. W. P. 

Karmoi, r. Oodeypore x. R, A. 

K arm pur, Moo) tan dis, P. 

Kamagarh, h. Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Karnal, cap, and dis, P. 

Kamaphuli, r. Chittagong dis, B. 

Kamatic or Camatic, pr, M. P. 

Kamaul, Mozuiferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Karnprayag, /./. Garhwal</rx, N. W. P. 

Kamsar, Jeypore x. R. A. 

Karo, r, Singhbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Karo, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Karodj^ar, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Karokhano, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Karoli, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Karon, r, N. W. P. 

Karond or Kalahandi, x. Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Karor, par, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Karor, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Karor, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Karra, par,- Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Karra, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Karrak, Saltmines, Kohat dis, P. 

Karsara, Rewah x, C. I. A. 

Karsod, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Karsuni, or, Krishni, r. N. W. P. 

Kartairi, r .Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Kartal, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Kartarpur, Jullundur dis, P. 

Kartikpur, Furreedpore flfex, B. 

Kartinad, x. Malabar dis, M. P. 

Karukalvadi, «. Salem dis, M. P. 

Karumanur Mitta, «. Salem dis, M. P. 

Karumattur, Madura dis, M. P. 

Karun, r. Raipur dis, C. P. 

Karunasagar, A. 

Karunguli, Chingleput dis, K. M. P. 

Karuntattamkudi Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Karur, r. x. and tal, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Karuwattampalli, Coimbatore ^ix, M. P. 

Karvetnagar, «. North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Karvir, Kolhapur x. Bo. P. 

Karwad, Kanara dis, Bo. P. 

Karwar, /. and tal, Kanara dif, Bo. P. 

Karwar, C. I. A. 

Karwi, /. and s,d, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Karya, h, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Karyala, Gujrat dis, P. 

Karyat Dost, Taunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Karyat Mendha, Jaunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Karyat Sikhar, par, Mirzapur <i/^, N. W. P. 

Kasai (Cossye,) r, B. 

Kasal, Sawant Wari x. Bo. P. 

Kasaini, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Kasalang, /. and r. Chittagong Hill Tracts dis^ B. 

Kasara, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Kasara, par, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Kasaraghat Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Kasaragod, South Canara dis, M. P. 

Kasari, Dewas x. C. I. A. 

Kasari, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 



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Alphabetical Index. 



K. 

Kasarkod, Kanara (iit^ Bo. P. 

Kasauli, cant, and tan^ Simla <^>, P. 

Kasba, Beerbhoom tiis, B. 

Kasba, Jessore dis, B. 

Kasba, Burdwan dis^ B. 

Kasba, Purneah dis^ Behar B. 

Kasba, h, Thar and Parkar dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Kasba, Tipperah dis^ B. 

Kasba, Amur Purneah dif^ Behar B. 

Kasba, Baniyachang, A. 

Kaseri, GwaJior x. C. I. A. 

Kasganj, /. and f.d, Etah dis, N. W. P. 

Kashab Kola Kheia, Tonk s. R. A. 

Kasheri, Ratnagiri </r/. Bo. P. 

Kashgar, cap^ and s. Central Asia. 

Kashijora, /ar, Midnapore </ir, B. 

Kashipur, Manbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Kashipur, Backergunge dit^ B. 

Kashipur, /. and par, Tarai dis, N. W. P. ' 

Kashipur, Kumaon dit, N. W. P. 

Kashipur, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Kashmir, cap, and s, P. 

Kashmor, /a/, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kashpur, Cachar dis, A. 

Kashti, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Kasia, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Kasiani, Furreedpore dif, B. 

Kasiari, Midnapore dis, B. 

Kasibugga, Ganjam dit, M. P. ' 

Kasijora, Midnapore dis^ B. 

Kasimabad, Ghazipur dit N. W. P. 

Kasimkot, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Kasimpur, Maldah dis B. 

Kasimpur, par, Purneah dis^ Behar B. 

Kasimpur, /ar, Raishahye </ix, B. 

Kasma, par, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Kasmar, pat , Sarun dis, Behar, B, 

Kasmar, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Kasna, Bulandshahr dis, N. \V. P. 

Kasimkota, z, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Kasta, par, Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kasur, /. and s.d, Lahore dis^ P. 

Kasurdi, Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Kaswar, p.p. Benares dis, N. W. P. 

Kata, Basim dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Katabali, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Katahra, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Katakhal, r, Cachar dis, A. 

Katalai, r,s» Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 

Katalgarh, Kumaun dis,li.Y^, P. 

Katambo, Ulwar s, R. A. 

Katangi, Jubbulpore db, C. P. 

Katangi, s.d, Seoni dis, C. P. 

Katangi, Balaghat dis, C. P. 

Katangi, s. Bilaspur dis, C. P, 

Katangi, /.r. Bctul dis, C. P. 

Kataigam, Surat dis, Bo. P. 

Katarmala, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Katas, Jhelum dis, P. 

Eatasahi, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Katauria, c.s. Bhagalpur dis^ Behar, B. 

Katdah or Porada, Nuddea dis, B. 

Katdaha, Nuddea <i/j^r, B. 

Kate, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Katchir, /./. Benares dis, N. W. P. 

Katha, r. N. W. P. 



K. 

Kathala, Gujrat dis, P. 

Kathali, Nuddea dis, B. 

Kathanian, Aroritsar dis, P. 

Katharigad, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Kathar Pahari, r. Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kathautia, r. Patna, dis, Behar, B. 

Kathe Puma, r. Berar, H. A. D. 

Kathi, Mewas s. Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 

Kathiar, par, Purneah dis, Behar, B. 

Kathirur, /. Malabar dis, M, P. 

Kathiwara, €, C. I. A. 

Kathjori, r. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kathle, ie^I, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Kathor, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Kathna, r. Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kathunangal, Amritsar dis, P, 

Eathunmar, Ulwar s, R. A. 

Kaiia, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Katian, par, Hardoi dir, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Katidi, Mymensingfa dis, B. 

Katigora, Cachar dis, A. 

Katipara, Jessore dis, B. 

Katiya, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Katjuri, r, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Katka, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Katkenwa, Chumparun dis, Behar B. 

Katkol, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Katkon, Rewah j. C. I. A. 

Katkut, par, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Katlang, Peshawar dis, P. 

Katmandu, cap, Nepal s, 

Katna, r. Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Katni, r. Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Katol, /. and sm. Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Katoria, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Katosan, Mahi Kanta, Bo. P. 

Katpadi, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Katra, Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Katra, Allahabad dis, N. \V. P. 

Katra, Shahjahanpur dis, N. W. P, 

Katra, Mozufferpore dis, Behar B. 

Katra, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Katraj, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Katras, par, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore B. 

Katuputur, «. Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 

Katur, Kanara dis, Bo. P. 

Kattywar, dis, and /r. Bo. P. 

Katyar, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kaukhali, Backergunge dis, B. 

Kaucha, r, Backergunge dis, B. 

Kaujalgi, Bel^um dis, Bo. P. 

Kaulana, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Kaulari, Dholpur s, R. A. 

Kaupur, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Kaure Shah, Montgomery dis, P. 

Kauria, z. Raipur dis, C. P. 

Kauria, Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

Kauria, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Kauria, par, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Kauriaganj, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Kauriala, r. Kheri dis, Oudh N. W. P. 

Kauriya, Bijnor flfiw, N. W. P. 

Kauta, Wardha dis. C. P. 

Kautha, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Kautha Yekand, Miraj s. Bo. P. 

Kautha, Basim dis, Beiar, H. A. D. 



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( Iv ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



K. 

Kauwakol, A. and sh, Gya dif, Behar, B. 

Kauwakol, A. Shahabad & Gya (tis, Behar, B. 

Kauyadighi, A. 

Kauyapasa, A. 

Kavai. Malabar dis, M. P. 

Kavaledurga, /a/, Shimoga ffis, Mysore /, M. P. 

Kavali, /a/, Nellore dit, ivl. P. 

Kavandapadi, Coirobatore dis, M. P. 

Kavarigudd, Belgaum disy Bo. P. 

Kaveri or Cauvery, r. Bo. and M, P. 

Kaveripak, North Arcot </ij, M. P. 

Kaveri patnam, Salem diSf M. P. 

Kaveripur, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Kavi, Broach dis^ Bo. P. 

Kavite, Ganjam </i>, M. P. 

Kavnaii Nasik dir. Bo. P. 

Kavvayi, Malabar diSf M. P. 

Kawach, r, Pandu Mewas s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Kawalwad, Kanara dtf. Bo. P. 

Kawant, Chota Udepur x. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Kawarda, x. Bilaspur dir, C. P. 

Kawgoon, cav€St Amherst dis, B. B, 

Kaya, A. Oodeyporc x. R. A. 

Kayalpatnam, Tinnevelly ^Vx, M. P. 

Kayamnagar, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Kayan or Ken, r. N. W. P. 

Kayar, Wun dir, Berar H. A. D. 

Kayatar, Tinncvelly diSf M. P. 

Kayatha, Indorex. C. I. A. 

Kayera, r. Jcssore dis^ B. 

Kazi Ahmad, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kazihata, par, Rajshahye dt's, B. 

Kazi para, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Kazipet, p.s, Caddapah dis^ M. P. 

Karipur, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Kazipura, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Kedar, par, Midnapore dlSf B. 

Kedareshwar, Surat dist Bo. P. 

Kedarganga, r. Garhwal dis, N. W. P. 

Kedarkanta, m. Garhwal dis, N. W. P. 

Kedarkunda. Midnapore dis, B. 

Kedamath, p.p. Garhwal dts, N. W. P. 

Kedarnath, fair, Goona Agency, C. I. A. 

Kedgaon, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Kedgaon, Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Kedgeree, I J, house^ Midnapore dis, B. 

Kekri, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Keladi, Shimoga dis, Mysore x. M . P. 

Kelapur, Wun dis, Berar, H, A. D. 

Kelaty cap, Baluchistan. 

Kelat, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Keliaghai, r, Midnapore dis, B. 

Keljhar. ft. Wardha dis, C. P. 

Kelnakushi. y2ifV, 'Bom dis, B. 

Kelod, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Kelshi, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Kelu, r. Sam^lpur dis, C. P. 

Kelva, Thana dis. Bo, P. 

Kem, Sholapur dis. Bo. P. 

Kemri, Je3rpore x. R. A. 

Ken r. Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Ken or Kayan, r. N. W. P. 

Kenchengod, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Kenda, z. Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Kendalo, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kendara, beel, Buiidwaa dis, B. 



Kendrapara, /. and x. d. Cuttack dis, Orifsa, B, 

Kendua, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kenduli, t. and /air, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Kendupatna, lana/ loc^, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kendur, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Kenduwa, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Ken5:eri, Bangalore dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Kenri,/tfr, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Kcobrang, p. Bashahr x. P. 

Keoladadar, f.r. Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Keoladeo, marsh, Bhurtpore x. R. A. 

Keolaree, Seoni dis, C. P. 

Keonjhar, /. x. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Keonrdachor, par, Balasore dis, <>issa, B. 

Keonthal, x. P. 

Kera, Cutch x. Bo. P. 

Kera, r. Satara</fx, Bo. P. 

Kera, par, Singhbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kera Mangraur, par, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Kerbana, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Kerowlee, cap, and x. R. A. 

Kerualkhanda, par^ Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kerur, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Kesanakurru, t. Godavari dis, M. P. 

Kesar, Thar & Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kesaria, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Kesarpura, z. Mewas x. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Keshabpur, Jessore dis, B. 

Keshiari, Midnapore dis, B. 

Keshlabori, tern, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Keshmi, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Keshnagar, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Keshnagarh, ruins, Singhbhoom dis, B. 

Keshni, Sultanpur dis^ Oudh, N, W. P. 

Kesho, r, Raipur dis, C. P. 

Keshora Patan, Tonk x. R. A. 

Keshpur, Midnapore dis, B. 

Kesod, Sorath dis, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Kesur, Dhar x. C. I. A. 

Kethri,//. Gwaliorx. C. I. A. 

Kcti Bandar, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Ketugram or Keugaon, Burdwan dis, B. 

Kewani, r. Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kewari, Backergunge dis, B. 

Khachraud, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Khadamba, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Khadda, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Khadro, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Khaga, Fatehpur <//x, N. W. P. 

Khagan, f. Hazara </fx, P, 

Khagaul Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Khagole, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Khagora, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Khagra, Purneah dis, Behar, B. 

Khagrabari, or Pratabganj, Goalpara dis. A. 

Khahi, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Khaibar,/. Afghanistan, N. W. Frontier, India. 

Khailar, Jhansi ^«x, N. W. P. 

Khair, s.d. Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Khairabad, par, Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Khairabad, Peshawar di^, P. 

Khairagali, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Khairagarh, /. Raipur dis, C. P. 

Khairagarhy par, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Khairagarh, par, Allahabad dis, N, W, P, 

Khairati, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 



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Alphabetical Index. 



Khairejikar, r. Shikarpur dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Khairi, s. Bhandara ^i^, C. P. 

Khairi, s. Bilaspur </m, C. P. 

Khairigarh, par, Khcri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Khairimurat, h, Rawalpindi dis^ P. 

Khaimagar, Farrukhabad dis, N. VV. P. 

Khairpur, Muzafiargarh <//>, P. 

Khairpur, Bahawalpur x. P. 

Khairpur, x. Sind, Bo. P. 

Khairpur Hyderabad dit, Sind, Bo. P. 

Khairpur Daharki, Shikaipur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Khairpur Natheshwar, Shikarpur dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Khairtal, Ulwur s, R. A. 

Khainikhel, Bannu dis, P. 

Khairwa, Mirzapur dir, N. W. P. 

Khairwa, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Khajauli, MozufTerpore dis, Behar, B. 

Khaini, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Khajoli, Durbhunga dis, Behar B. 

Khairi, Midnapore dis^ B. 

Khajri, s. Bhandara dis^ C. P. 

Khajuha, Fatehpur </i>, N. W. P. 

Khajura, Jessore dis, B. 

Khajurahu, C. I. A. 

Khajuri, Balasore^tx, Orissa, B. 

Khaluriya, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

Khakhatmau, par, Farrukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Khaki, Hazara dis, P. 

Khakreru, s.d, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Khaksis, Jalaun dis, N. W. P. 

Khal, Dhar x. C. I. A. 

Khalaighf^ora, A. 

Khalapur, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Khalari, /. and tern, Raipur dis^ C. P. 

Khalia, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Khaliajuri, par, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Khalilabad, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Khalra, Lahore dis, P. 

Khaira, par, Purneah dis, Behar, B. 

Khalsakhali, Backergunge dis, B. 

Khalthaun, e. Goona Agency, Gwalior x.- C. I. A. 

Khamaria, Saugor dis, C. T. 

Khamarpani Chhindwara dis, C. P. 

Khambhalia, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Khambarghat, Sylhet dis, A. 

Khamgaon, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Khamra, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Khan, Hyderabad dif, Sind, Bo. P. 

Khanakul, Hoogly dJs, B. 

Khanapur, par, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Khanapur, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Khanapur, tal, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Khanaut. r. N. W. P. 

Khanbaila, Bahawalpur x. P. 

Khand, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Khandaffhofth, Burdwan dis, B. 

Khandala, Poona^i'ix, Bo. P. 

Khandala, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Khandala Baura, Satara <^>, Bo. P. 

Khandansa, par, Fyiabad dis, Oudh N. W. P. 

Khandarpara, Furreedpore i^'x, B. 

Khandatam, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Khandauli, Agra dts, N, W. P. 

Khandauli, Bhagalnur dit, Behar, B, 

Khandeh, Banda dts, N. \V. P. 

Khandeha, Banda i^ix» N. W. P, 



Khandela, i. Jeypore x. R. A. 

Khandesh, dis. Bo. P. 

Khandghosh, Bardwan dis, B. 

Khandgiri, h. Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Khandhar, dis, Jeypore x. R. A. 

Khandi, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Khanditar, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Khand para, x. Orissa, B. 

Khandu, Banswara x. R. A. 

Khandu, Hyderabad dit, Sind, Bo. P. 

Khandwa, /. and i,d, Nimar dis, C. P. 

Khanewal, Mooltan dis, P. 

Khangah Dogran, Gujranwala dis, P. 

KhanganJ, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Khangarhy Muzaffargarh dis, P. 

Khangia, A. 

Khaniadhana, x. Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Khanikar, A. 

Khanjahanpur, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Khan Lund, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Khanna, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Khanna, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Khanpur, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Khan pur, Hazara dVx, P. 

Khanpur, Umballa dis, P. 

Khanpur, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Khanpur, Lunawara x. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Khanpur, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Khanpur, Shikarpur ^/x, Sind, Bo. P. 

Khanrraudhi, Rewah x. C. I. A. 

Khantapara, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Khanua, Bhurtpore x. R. A. 

Khanwah, ca. Lahore dis, P. 

Khanwahan, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo.- P. 

K banyan, Hooghly dis, B. 

Khaoyai, r. A. 

Khapa, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Khaparia, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Khaper-Khera, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Khaptiha, Banda <//x, N. W. P. 

Kharadihi, Rewah x. C. I. A. 

Kharagarh, A. 

Kharagdihaj/ar, Hararibagh^/ix, Chota-Ni^;pore, B. 

Kharaphora, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Kharaila, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Kharakdi, Furreedpore </£x, B. 

Kharakdiha, Hazanbagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kharakpur, Monghyr<7ix, Behar, B. 

Kharakpur, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 

Kharakwasia, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Kharal, Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Kharaoda, par, Indore x. C. I. A. 

Kharar, Midnapore dif, B. 

Kharar, /. and x. d. Umballa dis, P. 

Kharari, r. N. W. P. 

Kharba, Maldah dis, B. 

Kharba, par, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Kharbari, Biildana<^x. Berar, H. A. D. 

Kharda, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Kharda, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Khardaha, 24-Perguitnahs dis, B. 

Khardauli Mora, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Khardi, Thana dis. Bo. P. 

Kharedi, Hallar dit, Kattywar, Bo. P, 

Kharepatan, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Kharcia, Hamirpur dis^ N. W. P. 



Digitized by 



Google 



( Ivii ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



K. 



Khareri, Kattywar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Khargon, Indore x. C. I. A. 

Khargpur, par, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Khargram, Mooishe£ibad dts, B. 

Kharhi, r. Rae Bareli clis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Khari, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Khari, Bickaneer s, R. A. 

Khari, 24-Perguimahs dis, B. 

Khari, r. Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Khari, r. Burdwan iAsf B. 

Khari, r. Oodeyporej. R. A. 

Khari, r. N. W. P. 

Kharia, r. M3nnensingh dis, B. 

Kharian, Gujrat dis, r, 

Khariar, s. Raipur dis, C. P. 

Kharid, par, Gnazipnr dis, N. W. P. 

Khari Katia, A. 

Kharinasi, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kharindwa, Umballa dis, P. 

Kharir, Cutch s. Bo. P. 

Kharia Bijpura,/M>, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Khark, Rohtak dis, P. 

Kharkai, r. Singhbhoom </{V, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kharkala, VoonB, dis, Bo. P. 

Kharkari, Jejrpore s. R. A. 

Kharkati, Kishengurh s, R. A. 

Kharkhar, Hazaribagh dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Kharkhauda, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Kharkhauda, Rohtak dis,F. 

Kharod, r. Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Kharond, r, Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Kharora, /./. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo P. 

Kharranjan, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Kharsal, z, Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Kharsand, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar B. 

Kharsanwa, s,d. Singhbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kharsaud, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Khar Shahabaz Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Kharsi Jhalaria, €. Indore x. C. I. A. 

Kharsia, ^, Bhopal s. C, I. A. 

Kharsua, r, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kharturi, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Kharwa, Ajmere dis, R, A. 

Kharwandi, Ahmednagar dis, Bo. P. 

Khasa, Amritsar dis. P. 

Khaslw, Belgaum ais, Bo. P. 

Khasi, A. A. 

Khasi and Jaintia Hills, dis, A. 

Khassultak, Rungpore dis, B. 

Khas-taluk, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Khatau, fa/, Satara dis, Bo. P. 

Khatauli, par, Muzaflfarnagar dis, N. W. P. 

Khatbinsahi, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Khathar, Hyderbad dis, Sind , Bo. P. 

Khati, Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Khatian, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo, P. 

Khatkar Tonk s, R. A. 

K hat khari, Rewah s. C. I. A. 

Khatmandu, cap, Nepal, s. Northern India. 

Khatoal, A. 

Khatora, Chanda, dis, C. P. 

Khatu, Jeypore j. R. A. 

Khawasa, C. I, A. 

Khayrasol, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Khazana, Peshawar dis, P. 

Khed /a/, Ratnagiri dis, Bo. P. 



K. 



Khed, fa/, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Khed, Wun dis, Berar ,H. A. D. 

Khedbramha, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Khekra, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Khemat, Palanpurx. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Khemkam, Lahore dis, P. 

Kheora, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Khera, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Khera Bajhera, par, Shahjahanpur, dis, N. W. P. 

Kheralu, Baroda s, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Kherawara, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Kheri, Mandla dis, C. P. 

Kheri, cap, and dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kheri, Rohtak dis, P. 

Kherighat, Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kherkheria, Darrang dis, A. 

Khema, Thana</w, Bo. P. * 

Khemi, Nowgong dis, A. 

Khertal, UJwur s, R.A. 

Kherwah, can, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kherwara, canf, Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Kherwari, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Khetair, p/ain, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Kheta Sarai, Jaunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Khetlal, Bogra dis, B. 

Khetri, A. and s. Jeypore s. R. A, 

Khetupara, Pubna dts, B. 

Kheura, Jhelum dis, P. 

Khiaoda, Goona Agency, Gwalior, s, C. I. A. 

Khijaria, Kattywar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Khilchipur, s. C. I. A. 

Khimauna, Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Khimel, A. Banswara s, R. A. 

Khimlasa, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Khinswar, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Khipra, /a/, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P, 

Khirkhiria, A, Monghyr dis, Behar, B, 

Khirki, par, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Khiri, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Khiri, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Khiron, par, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Khirpai, Midnapore dis, B. 

Khirthar, m.r. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Khisor, A* Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Khiwa, Jhang dis, P. 

KhlsTsarai, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Khoaja Khizzar, Kohat dis, P. 

Khobragarhi, r. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Khoda, Umballa dis, P. 

Khoda Sarai, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Khohjhil, /. Bhurtpore s. R. A. 

Khohri, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Khokhar, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Khoksa, Nuddea dis, B. 

Khol, Gurcaon dis, P. 

Kholakhali, 24-Pcrgunnahs dis, B. 

Kholapur, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D, 

Kholpetna, r, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Khoolna, s.d. Jessore dis, B. 

Khorarianwala, Jhang dis, P. 

Khorda, c, and s.d. Poorce dis, Orissa, B. 

Khori, Lahore dis, P. 

Khorsi, r. Raipur dis, C. P. 

Khorwah, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Khot, Hissar dis, P. 

Khoth, Gujranwala dis, P. 



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( Iviii ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



K. 



Khudabad, Hyderabad dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Khudabad, /.i.i. Karachi </iJ, Sind, Bo. P. 

Khudaganj, Farnikhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Khudaganj, Shahiahanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Khudia, r. Manbnoom dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Khudian, Lahore dit^ P. 

Khuiji, «. Raipur dis, C. P. 

Khuiner, par^ Narsinghgarh s, C. I. A. 

Khuksia, beel, Jessore dis, B. 

Khumbra, Shikarpur dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Khundalu, /. Hindur s. P. 

Khuni, dis, Sirohee j. R. A. 

Khunichak, Gujrat dis, P. 

Khunta, Cuttack dis^ Orissa, B. 

Khunti, Lohardugga///j, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Khupi, Rungpore dis^ B. 

Khurchhuta, Hazaribkfh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Khurd Daithna, Ahmednagar dis^ Bo. P, 

Khurdi, C. I. A. 

Khurhand, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Khurja, s.d. Bulandshahr </ix, N. W. P. 

Khurpa Tal, Kumaun dis, N. VV. P. 

Khurrampur, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Khurtana, Rawalpindi dis^ P. 

Khushab, Shahpur dis^ P. 

Khushalgarh, Kohat dis, P. 

Khutar, par, Shahjahanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Khutgaon, z, Chanda dts^ C. P. 

Khutha, Rewah r. C. I. A. 

Khuyar, Balasore dis^ Orissa, B, 

Khuzakhel, Kohat dis, P. 

Khwa, /. and r. Sandoway dis^ B. B. 

Khwajakalan, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Khyrim or Nong-Krem, /. Khasi Hills, dis^ A. 

Khyrpur Dherki, Shikarpur dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Khyrpur Nathanshah, Shikarpur dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Kiamari, i. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kichaha, Kumaun disy N . W. P. 

Kichak,ya/>, Bogra ^iV, B. 

Kiching, Singhbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kidderpore, Calcutta sub^ 24-PergunDahs dis, B. 

Kiggatnad, tal, Coorg, M. P. 

KiKri, Mooltan dis, P. 

Kikvi, Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Kilacheri, Chingleput dis, M. P. 

Kila Didar Singh, (jujranwala dis, P. 

Kilaghat, Durbhunga disy Behar, B. 

Kilapalur, Trichinopoly disy M. P. 

Kilakarai, Madura dis^ M. P. 

Kilang, Kangra dis, P. 

Kila Sobha Singh, Sialkot dis^ P. 

Kiling, r. Nowgong dis^ A. 

Kiliyar, r. Travancore j. M. P. 

Kilkarai, Madura dis, M. P. 

Killa Agarkot, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Killa Heregandawagad, par, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Killa Kaema, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Killa Mangalpur, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Killa Mihan Singh, Gujranwala dis, P. 

K^'llapatna, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

KilH, 1' trozepore dis, P. 

Kili'^iwala, Montgomery dis, P. 

Kilp-^lawiir, Tricliiijopoly </w, M. P. 

Kilpuri, par, Tarai dis, N. W. P. 

Kim, r. and /. Sural dis. Bo. P. 

Kimari, Karachi, dis, Sind, Bo. P. 



Klmashpur, Delhi dis, P. 

Kimedi, «. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Kimlia, /. Bashahr s, P. 

Kingaon, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Kinhi, «. Balaghat dis, C. P. 

Kini, Basim dit, Berar, H. A. D. 

Kini, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Kinjar, Muzafl^garh dis, P. 

Kintali, %. Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Kiokradan, h. Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Kiolari, Seoni dis, C. P. 

Kiratpur, par, Bijnor dis, N. W. P. 

Kiri, r. Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Kirkee, cant, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Kirlampudi, %. Godavari dis, M. P. 

Kirli, Dang s, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Kimahar, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Kimapur, t. Balaghat dis, C. P. 

Kirpilian, Hazara dis, P. 

Kirran, r. Amritsar dis, P. 

Kirthal, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Kirtinasa, r. B. 

Kirtipasa, Backerfi:ange dis, B. 

Kiruri, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Kirval^dd, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Kirwatti, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Kishandas ka Talao, Delhi dis, P. 

Kishanganj, Damoh dis, C, P. 

Kishangarh, Teypore s, R. A. 

Kishangarh, Jeysulmere s, R, A. 

Kishangarh, Ulwur s, R. A. 

Kishanpur, Fatchpur dis, N. W. P. 

Kishanpur, p.p, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Kishengani, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Kishengurh, cap, and s, R. A. 

Kishnaghur, /. and s.d, Nuddea dis, B. 

Kishni, par, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Kishorganj, Rungpore </i>, B. 

Kishorganj, s,d, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Kishtwar, Kashmir s, P. 

Kisko, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kisoriah, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Kissengunge, /. and s,d, Purneah dis, Behar, B. 

Kistna, dis, and r, M. P. 

Kistnai>atam, port, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Kistnapur, Travancore s, M. P. * 

Kitha, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Kithor, par, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Kitipgarh, Bhor s, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Kittur, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Kittur Prant, ^ar, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Kivalur, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Kiwai, par, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Koamara, A. 

Kobra, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Kobragarhi, n Chanda dis, C. P. 

Kochas, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Kochi Bandar, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Kochila, beel, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Kod, C. I. A. 

Kod, tal, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Kodachadri, h, Shimoga dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Kodachi Parvat, h. South Canara dis, M. P. 

Ko(hgandapalle, r./. Cuddapah dis, M. P. 

Kodaikanal, Maidura dis, M. P. 

Kodamendhi, Nagpur dis^ C. P. 



Digitized by ^ 



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( lix ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



K. 

Kodanad, Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Kodarma, par, Hazaribagh dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B, 

Kodashiri, h. Cochin s. M. P. 

Koda Sbadri, k. Shimoga dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Kodaikanal, Madura dis^ M. P. 

Kodambakam, r.s, Chingleput du^ M. P. 

Kodavasal, Tanjore dis, M. P, 

Kodawuratd, r. Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Kodinar, Gohelwad dis^ Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Kodlihobli, hob, Yelsavirshime, /a/, Coorg, M. P. 

Kodlipet, Yelsavirshime, ial, Coorg, M. P. 

Kodumudi, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Kodumur, Kumool dis, M. P. 

Kodungalur, /. Travancore s. M. P. 

KoduDgalur, Cochin s» M. P. 

Kodur, Cuddapah dis, M. P. 

Kohala, Hazara dif, P. 

Kohara, Lndhiana dist P. 

Kohat, cap, and dis^ P. 

Kohat Tawi, r. Kohat dis, P. 

Kohima, Naga Hills dis^ A. 

Kohkhiraj, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Kohol, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Kohor, Peint j. Bo. P. 

Koil, /. and /. d, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Koil, r. Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Koilaghat or Kola, Midnapore dis, 6. 

Koilaman, beel^ Durbhunga </<>, Behar, B. 

Koilkuntla, tal, Kumool dis, M. P. 

Koilo, Cut tack dis, Orissa, B. 

Koilpatam, Tinncvelly dis, M. P. 

Koilpati, Tinnevclly <?i>, M. P. 

Koilsa, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Koilwar, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Koipur, /. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Kokarayanpet, z, Salem dis, M. P. 

Kokatnur, Kaladgi^iV, Bo. P. 

Kokatnur, par, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Kokpara, Singhbhoom dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kokuakhanda, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kola, Dacca dis, B. 

Kola, bed, Tessore dis, B. 

Kola, /. Midnapore dis, B. 

Kolalxi dis, and U, house, Bo. P. 

Kolabira, 2. Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Kolad, r. Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Kolair, /. Godavari dis, M. P. 

Kolak, Surat dis, Bo. P. 

Kolakambai, r. Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Kolambur, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Kolangod, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Kolanka, «. Godavari dis, M. P. 

Kolapur, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Kolar, cap, and dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Kolaras, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Kolarbetta or Shatashringaparvata, h, Kolar dis, 

Mysore s. M. P. 
Kolatur, Chingleput dis, M. P. 
Kolatur, Trichinopoly dis, M . P. 
Kola3rat, Bickaneer /. R. A. 
Kolebira, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Kolgaon, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 
Kolhan, par, Singhbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Kolhapur, cap, and s. Bo. P. 
Kolhar, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 
Kolbar, Kaladgi, dis^ Bo. P, 



Kolladam, r. Trichinopoly dis, M. P, 

Kollamallai, h. Salem dis, M. P. 

Kollegal, ial, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Kollurghat, /. Shimoga dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Kolshet, r, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Komalmer, /. and//. Oodeypur s. R. A, 

Komaralingam, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Komaramangalam, 2. Salem dis, M. P. 

Kombai, Madura dis, M. P. 

Kombakonam, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Kommaddi, Madura dis, M. P. 

Kon, Mirzapur dis, N. W» P. 

Konai, r, Rungpore dis, B. 

Konar, r. Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Konchikod, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Kondanoor, Madura dis, M. P. 

Kondapalli, Kistna dis, M. B* 

Kondapuram, Cuddapah dis, M. P^ 

Kondavir, Kistna dis, M. P, 

Kondhali, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Kondhanpur, Poona dis. Bo. F, 

Kondhiwata, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Kondka, ^. C. P. 

Kondotti, p.s. Malabar dis, M. P. 

Kondrapur, Azamgurh dis, N. W. P. 

Konganapuram, «. Salem dis M. P. 

Kongnoli, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Konityna, Tharrawaddy dis, B. B. 

Konkan, /. c. Bo. P. 

Konkandiva, Kolaba dis, Bo. P- 

Konnagar, Hooghly dis, B. 

Konnur, Dharwar dis. Bo. P» 

Konra, h. Bankoora dis, B. 

Konrakdi, Furreedpore dis, B, 

Koondum, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Koosee, r. Bhagalpur & Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Kooshtea, r. s, and s. d, Nuddea dis^ B. 

Kopa, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Kopaganj, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Kopai, r,, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Kopargaon, tal, Ahmcdnagur dis. Bo. P. 

Kopilas, h, Orissa, B. 

Koppa, Kadur, dis, Mysore, s, M. P. 

Kopra, r, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Kora, h, Manbhoom^w, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kora, /. and s, d, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Korabaga, «. Sambalpur dis. C. P, 

Koracha, s. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Korada, z, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Koradacheri, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Koradgaon, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. F, 

Korai, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Korai, r. Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Koraikela, z. Singhbhoom, dis, Chota-Nagpore, Bt 

Kora Jahanabad, Fatehpur dis, N, W. P. 

Koramdesar, Bickaneer j. R. A. 

Korame, Lohardugga, dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Korantadih, Ghazipur dis, N, W. P. 

Koraput, Jeypur «. Vizagapatam dis, M. P, 

Koratagere, Tumkur dif, Mysore s, M. P. 

Korba, z, Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Korea, s, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Koregaon, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Koregaon, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Korh, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Korhala, Ahmednagar dis^ Bo. P. 



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( Ix ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



K. 



Korhati, Dacca dist 6. 

Kori, Cutch T. Bo. P. 

Koringa, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Kori pur, Jaunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Korkani, Kanara dis^ Bo. P. 

Korlai, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Korlam, Chingleput dis^ M. P. 

Korlo, par^ Pooree dis^ Orissa, B. 

Kortalayar, r. Chingleput dis, M. P, 

Korungalaikudi, Madura dis, M P. 

Korwan, h, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Korwar, Kaladgi dis^ Bo. P. 

Eosa Nag, A. Kashmir s. P. 

Kosgai, h, Bilaspur, dis» C. P. 

Kosgi, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Kosi, par. Multra, dis, N. W. P. 

Kosi, r. N. W. P. 

Kosida, Cuttack dis^ Orissa, B. 

Kosigi, Bellary dis^ M. P. 

Kota, Nellore dts, M. P. 

Kota, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Kot Adu, 5, d. MuzafTargarh, dis^ P. 

Kotagiri, m, Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Kotah, capf and s. R. A. 

Kotaha, /. c. Amballa dis^ P. 

Kotaikarriar, r. Madura dis, M. P. 

Kotal, Kohat, dis, P. 

Kotaldi, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kotalpur, Burdwan dis^ B. 

Kotampati, z. Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Kotapakondah, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Kotapalle, Cuddapah dis^ M. P. 

KotapalU, s. d. Bastar, s, C. P. 

Kotapatam, Nellore dis^ M. P. 

Kotar, Travancore j. M. P. 

Kotaraikarrai, Travancore s, M. P. 

Kotayam, /a/, Malabar dis^ M. P. 

Kot Banawar, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Kot Bhai, Ferozepore dis^ P. 

Kotbhajani, Cooch Behar j. B. 

Kotchandpur, Jessore dis^ B. 

Kot Chutta, Dera Ghazi Khan dis^ P. 

Kotda Sangani, Hallar dis^ Katty war, Bo. P. 

Kotdi, Cutch, J. Bo. P. 

Kotdwara, Garhwal dis, N. W. P. 

Kotebetta, h, Nanjarajpatna, /a/, Coorg, M. P. 

Kotekisarai, Gwalior, j. C. I. A. 

Koteshwar, /. /. C. I. A. 

Kot Fatah Khan, Rawalpindi dis^ P. 

Kotgal, 2. Chanda dis^ C. P. 

Kotgarh, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh N. W. P. 

Kotgarh, j. Simla dis^ P. 

Kot gasht, Patna, dis^ Behar B. 

Koth, Ahmedabad dis^ Bo. P. 

Kotham z. Godavari dis^ M. P. 

Kothapet, Godavari dis^ M. P. 

Kothar, h. Karachi </*>, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kothar, Balasore dis^ Orissa, B. 

Kothara. Cutch J. Bo. P. 

Kothesri, r. Oodeypore s. R. A. 

Kothi, /. Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Kothibhar, Gorakhpur dis^ N. W. P. 

Kothide, e, C. I. A. 

Kothila, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Kothilwa, h, Shahabad (Us^ Behar, B. 

Kothimbra, Satara dis^ Bo. P. 



K. 

Kothri, par, Malwa, Indore s, C. I. A, 

Koti, Jubbulpore atfx, C. P. 

Kotila, par, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Kotipalli, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Kotitirth, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Kot Isashah, }hang dis, P. 

Kot Kadir. Bijnor dU, N. W. P. 

Kot Kamalia, Montgomery (Us, P. 

Kot Kapura, r, P. 

Kot Kasim, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Kot Khai, Simla dis, P. 

Kot Kasim, par, Jeypore s. R. A, 

Kot Khirgi, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Kot Khizri, Gujranwala dis, P. 

Kotla, Kangra, dis, P. 

Kotla Niha^, Umballa, dis, P, 

Kotli, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Kotli Loharun, Sialkot dis, P. 

Kot Moman, Shahpur dis, P. 

Kot Nasran, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Kot Putli, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Kotra, cant, Oodejrpore x. R. A. 

Kotra, Jalaun dis, N. W. P. 

Kotra, Rajgarh r. C. I. A. 

Kotrahang, Hooghly dis, B. 

Kotri, tal, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kotri Allahrakhyo, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kot Salbahan, par, Budaun dis^ N. W. P. 

Kot Somaba, P. 

Kot Sultan, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Kot Tagga, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Kottapalle, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Kottapatam, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Kottavalsa, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Kottur, Padinalknad tal, Coorg, M. P. 

Kotul, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Kotur, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Kotwal, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Kotwalipara, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Kot Zafar Khan, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Kovalong, Chingleput dis, M.P. 

Koviladi, Tanjore dis, M. P, 

Kovilamj Chingleput dis, M. P. 

Kovjlpatti, Tinnevelly <^, M. P. 

Kovilur, Madura dis, M. P. 

Kowad, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Kowarpur, A. 

Koyah, Cachar dis, A. 

Koyakhai, r. Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Koyar, Burdvran dis, B. 

Koychai, Burdwan dis, B. 

Koyna, r. Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Krishna, r. Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Krishna!, Rungpore dis, B. 

Krishnaganj, Nuddea dis, B. 

Krishnagiri, tal, Saiem dis, M. P. 

Krishnanandapur, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Krishnapatnam, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Krishni or Karsnni, r. N. W. P. 

Kristanagar, Hooghly dis, B. 

Krosur, Kistna cUs, M. P. 

Kshetrichapri, A. 

Kshira or Palar, r. Mysore s, M. P. 

Kuanpal, Cuttack dis, Orissa B. 

Kuarganj, Rungpore dis, B. 

Kub, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P, 



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Google 



( Ixi ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



K. 

Kubia Sangam, f,p, C. I. A. 

Kucnaikol, Bankoora disy B. 

Kuchaikore, Sarun dtSf Behar, B. 

Kuchaman, Jodbpore x. R. A. 

Kuchera, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Kuchha, r. Berar, H. A. D. 

Kudal, Sawant Wari s. Bo. P. 

Kudarimukh, h. South Canara dis^ M. P. 

Kudarkol, Etawah dis, N. W. P. 

Kuddapakum, Chingleput dis^ M. P. 

Kudikad, South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Kudli, /./. Shimoga dis, Mysore, a M. P. 

Kudligi, tal, Bcllary dit, M. P. 

Kudra, r. Shahabad dis^ Behar, B. 

Kuduremukha h, Kadur dis^ Mysore, /. M. P. 

Kuhira, r. Shahabad dis^ Behar, B. 

Kuhum Jognia, A. 

Kuhunda, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kuilapal, /ar, Manbhoom dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kujan, t,s, Cuttack dis^ Orissa, B. 

Kujhi, h, Bhagalpur dis^ Behar, B. 

Kukadra, Rajpipla s, Rewakanta, Bo. P. • 

Eukai, cr. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kukana, Ahmednagar dis, Bo. P. 

Kukari, r, Poona disy Bo. P. 

Kukarmunda, par^ Khandesh dis, 60. P. 

Kukkuluba, x. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Kukrahati, Midnapore dis, B. 

Kukra Mailani, par, Kheri </«>, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kukreshar, par, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Kukri, beely Rajshahye dis, B. 

Kukria, Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Kukrul, par, Rungpore dis, B. 

Kuksi, Dhar s, C. I. A. 

Kukomahi, r. Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Kulachi, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Kulaghat, Rungpore a'iT, B. 

Kulasekharapatnain, Tinnevelly dit^ M. P. 

Kuldunna, Rawalpindi dii, P. 

Kulghari, Ferozepore dis, P. 

Kulhawar, Rohtak dis, P. 

Kulia,/it>, Nuddea dis, B. 

Kulik, r, Dinacepore dis, B. 

Kulikarai, Tanjore dis^ M. P. 

Kulingram, Burdwan dis^ B. 

Kulltalai, /a/, Trichinopoly dis, M, P. 

Kulitora, Travancore s, M. P. 

Kullakamby, Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Kullar, Nilgiri disy M. P. 

Kullowad, Sialkot dis, P. 

Kullu, Kangra dit, P. 

KuUum, Amraoti dify Berar, H. A. D. 

Kollur, /. South Canara dis, M. P. 

Kulpahar, Hamirpur disy N. W. P. 

Kulpi, 24-Pergunnahs disy B. 

Kulsi, r. and /.r. Kamrup dis. A, 

Kultikri, Midnapore diSy B. 

Ku!u, s,d, Kangra diSy P. 

Kumadwati, r. Dharwar diSy Bo. P. 

Kumaira, Chitti4;ong diSy B. 

Kumalgarh, ft, Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Kumar, r. Furreedpore and Jessore, diSy B, 

Kumarapuram, Tinnevelly diSy M. P. 

Kumarganj, Rungpore diSy B. 

Kuman, beely Rajshahye diSy B. 

Kumari, r, Manbhoom 4is^ Chota-Nagpore, B, 



K. 

Kumarkharadhara, A. 

Kumarpur, par^ Purneah disy Behar, B. 

Kumbakamdroog, h. Chingleput disy M. P. 

Kumbakonam, Tanjore disy M. P. 

Kumbardegudd, Bel^um disy Bo. P. 

Kumbhardegudda, Kanara diSy Bo. P. 

Kumbhari, s.d. Bo. P. 

Kumbharli, h, Ratnagiri dity Bo. P. 

Kumbharwara, Kanara disy Bo. P. 

Kumbhoj, Kolhapur j. Bo. P. 

Kumbi, Upper Smd Frontier disy Sind; Bo. P. 

Kumbla, South Canara disy M. P. 

Kumharsain, s. Simla disy P. 

Kumher, dis, Bhurtpore s. R. A. 

Kumhrawan, pary Rae Bareli disy N. W. P. 

Kumhri, r. Patna diSy Behar, B. 

Kumiria, Chittagong diSy B. 

Kumra, pary Durbhunga diSy Behar, B. 

Kumraj, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Kumtia, A. 

Kumudvati, r. Mysore s. M. P. 

Kun, r. Pandu Mewas s, Rewakanta, Bo. P. 

Kunch, s.d, Jalaun disy N. W. P. 

Kund, Shahpur disy P. 

Kund, Cutch s. Bo. P. 

Kunda, r. Kurnool diSy M. P. 

Kunda, s,d. Partabgarh diSy Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kunda, par, Hazaribagh eUsy Chota Nagpore, B. 

Kundahit Kareya,/ar. Sonthal Pergunnsdis dis^ 

Behar, B. 
Kundahs, The, m,r,y Nilgiri dity M. P. 
Kundal, Gurgaon disy P. 
Kundal, Kanara dity Bo. P. 
Kun Daro, Hyderabad disy Sind, Bo. P. 
Kundal^aon, Nasik dity Bo. P. 
Kundalika, r., Kolaba diSy Bo. P. 
Kundallika Korbala, r., Kolaba disy Bo. P. 
Kundapur, r. South Canara diSy M. P. 
Kundar, r, Mysore s, M. P. 
Kundariya, Shahjahanpur diSy N. W. P. 
Kundgol, Jamkhandi /. 60. P. 
Kundgol, s,y Dharwar disy Bo. P. 
Kundi, r., Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 
Kundi, pary Cuttack diSy Orissa, B. 
Kundi, Rungpore diSy B. 
Kundla, Gohelwad disy Kattjrwar, Bo. P. 
Kundola, Beerbhoom disy B. 
Kundri, pary Sitapur disy Oudh, N. W. P. 
Kundu, r, Kurnool diSy M. P. 
Kundurapallimitta. s. Salem diSy M. P, 
Kunhiar, s. P. 

Kunigal, Tumk«r diSy Mysore s, M. P, 
Kunjabangar, Cuttack diSy Orissa, B. 
Kunja Ghoraghat, Rungpore diSy B. 
Kunjah, Gujrat dity P. 
Kunjpura, Kamal diSy P. 
Kunjrod, C. I. A. 

Kunnamangalam, North Arcot diSy M. P. 
Kunnandagudi, Tanjore disy M. P. 
Kuno, r. Gwalior s, C. I. A. 
Kunsa, Rae Bareli disy Ondh, N. W. P. 
Kunta, Surat diSy Bo. P. 
Kunti, r. Hoogly diSy B. 
Kunti3rana, Sorath dity Kattywar, Bo. P. 
Kunor r, Burdwan diSy B. 
Kupari, Balasore dis^ Orissa, B. 



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( Ixii ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



K. 

Kupasan, Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Kupgal, r. J. Bellary dis, M. P. 

Kupha, r., Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Kupi, Sawant Wari x. Bo. P. 

Kupla, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Kuppam, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Kuppelur, Dharwar//tf, Bo. P. 

Kuppili, «. Vizagapatam </w, M. P. 

Kura, Kolaba <//>, Bo. P. 

Kura, Jhallawad dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Kura, Jodhpore x. R. A. 

Kurai, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kurai, Jubbulpore dis^ C. P. 

Kurai, s.d, Saugor dis^ C. P. 

Kuraibhar, Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kurail, /. C. I. A. 

Kuraishi, Muzaffargarh dis^ P. 

Kuraishiwala, Mooltan dis^ P. 

Kurai, Sawantwari x. Bo. P« 

Kurali, Umballa dis, P. 

Kurali, r., Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Kuram, Amraoti dis^ Berar, H. A. D. 

Kurambranad, /a/, Malabar dit, M. P. 

Kurana, par^ Sitapur </w, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kurangasasan, Cuttack dis^ Orissa, B. 

Kurankhed, Akola dis^ Berar, H. A. D. 

Kuraoli, /ar, Mainpuri <//>, N. W. P. 

Kuraon, Ghazipur ah, N. W. P. 

Kuraon, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Kurar, r. Raipur dir, C. P. 

Kurara, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Kurasar, s,d, Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kurauli, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Kurchi, BeTgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Kurdu, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Kurduwari, Sholapur </«>, Bo. P. 

Kurgaon, Kerowleex. R. A. 

Kurha, Amraoti dity Berar, H. A. D. 

Kurhurbaree, x.^. Hazaribagh^cV, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kuri, Hissar dit^ P. 

Kurigram, Rungpore dif^ B. 

Kurikhai, par, Mymensingh dis^ B, 

Kurinjipadi, South Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Kurivikulam, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Kurji, Patna dis^ Behar, B. 

Kurla, «. Ganjam dis^ M. P. 

Kurmagad, Kanara dir^ Bo. P. 

Kurmingya, h, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Kurmatur, Travancore x. M. P. 

Kumool, capf and dis, M. P, 

Kuroli, Miraj x. Bo. P. 

Kurpa, Cuddapah dis, M . P. 

Kurrachee or Karachi, cap, & dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kurram, r. Bannu dis^ P. 

Kurresgaon, Ellichpur dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Kursad, par, Surat dis, Bo. P. 

Kursadatan, r., Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Kursat, Unao dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 



Labana, r. Cuttack dts, Orissa, B. 
Labdarya, /a/, Shikarpur dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 
Labhanga, beel^ Burdwan dis, B. 
Labhauwa, Mainpuri dis^ N. W* P. 



K. 

KuTseong, Darjeellng dis, B. 

Kursi, par, Bara Banki dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kurtha, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Kurtkoti, Dharwar disy Bo. P. 

Kuruagaon, Darrang dis, A. 

Kurudamale, h. Kolar dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Kurulgachhi, Nuddea dis^ B. 

Kurumbranad, Malabar, dis, M. P. 

Kurumi, r. Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Kurun, Amraoti diSy Berar H. A. D. 

Kurundwad, x. Bo. P. 

Kurupam, «. Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Kurur, r., Chanda dis, C. P. 

Kurwai, x. Bhopal x. C. I. A. 

Kurwandi, Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Kusalgarh, Banswara x. R. A. 

Kusapala, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Kushahata, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Kushai, beel, Rajshahye dis^ B. 

Kushambi, plains Rajshahye dis, B. 

Kushavati, r., Kolar dis^ Mysore x. M. P. 

Ku^bhadra, r, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Kusiyara, r. Sylhet dis, A. 

Kusmandal, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Kusmandi, Lucknow dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kusmara, Mainpuri dit, N. W. P. 

Kussora, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kusumbhi, Unao ^x, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kusumi, r. Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Kusur, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Kutabdia, i. and Lt. home, Chittagong dis, B. 

Kutahan, Jaunpur dis, N, W. P. 

Kutana, par, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Kutasa, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Kutbiwal, Jullundur dis, P. 

Kuthar, x. P. 

Kuthaund, Jalaun dis, N. W. P. 

Kuthiala Shekhan, Gujrat dis, P. 

Kutia, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Kutia Gunir, par, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Kuttipuram, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Kutku, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Kutlehr, Kangra dis, P. 

Kutradi, p. Malabar dis, M. P. 

Kuttalam, Tanjore//«x, M. P. 

Kuttalam, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Kuttaparamba, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Kuttiyadi, p, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Kutumba, par, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Kuturu, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Kuvesi, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Kuwana, r. Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Kuwari, r, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Kuwari, f. N. W. P. 

Kuyangerinad, hob, Padinalknad ttd, Coorg, M. P. 

Kydganj, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Kykaram, Godavari dis, M. P. 

KyoukhpyoOy cap, and dis, B. B. 



Labpur, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Laccadive, i, Indian Ocean, Sth. Canara dis, M. P. 
Lachhibag, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Lachhmangarh, Jeypore x. R« A. 



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( ixiii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



L. 

Lachhmanearii, Ulwur s. R. A. 

Lpachhmi Narayan, sh. Tonk s, R. A. 

Lachi, Kohat dis, P. 

Ladakh, dis^ Kashmir s, P. 

Ladara, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Ladha, h, Singhbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Ladhora, Gwalior /. C. I. A, 

Ladhran, Ludbiana dis^ P. 

Ladna, Burdwan dis^ B. 

Ladnum, Jodhpore j. R. A. 

Laduari, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Ladunia, /. Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Ladwa, Umballa dis, P. 

Ladwi, Hissar dis, P. 

Lagarghichcha, r, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Lagoa, h. Sonthal Pergunnsdis dis, Behar, B. 

Lahal, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Lahar, /. andy?. Gwalior /. C. I. A. 

Lahar, Peshawar dis, P. 

Laharpur, par, Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Lahiri, Dinacepore dis, B. 

Lahli, Rohtak dis, P. 

Lahoal, A. 

Lahore, cap, dis, and div, P. 

Lahori Bandar, Sind, Bo. P. 

Lahual, Lakhimpur dis, A. 

LahonI, valley, Kangra dis, P. 

Laichanpur, ft, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Laira, s. Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Laitmas-doh, h. Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis^ A. 

Lakadia, Cutch s. Bo. P. 

Lakaha, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Lakai, Sylhet dis, A. 

Lakda, par, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Lakh, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Lakha, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Lakhaitara, r. Kamrup dis, A. 

Lakhandih, r, Mozufferp>ore dis, Behar, B. 

Lakhanhati, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Lakhanjhir, Lalitpur dis, N. VV. P. 

Lakhanmajra, Rohtak dis, P. 

Lakhannath, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Lakhanpur, /ar, Bhagalpur <//>, Behar, B. 

Lakhanwah, Rewah j. C. I. A. 

Lakhanwara, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Lakhapadar, Kattywar dis, Kaitywar, Bo. P. 

Lakhat, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Lakhat, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 

Lakhi, /. and h, Skikarpur dis, Siad. Bo. P. 

Lakhimpur, cap, and dis, A. 

Lakhimpur, /. and s,d. Kheri dit, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Lakhipur or Lakshmipur, Cachar dis^ A. 

Lakhipur, Goal para dis, A. 

Lakhmia, r. Dacca dis, B. 

Lakhmipasa, Jessore <Us, B. 

Lakhraipur, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Lakhmipur, s,d, Noakholly dis, B. 

Lakhmirdona, r. Noakholly dis^ B. 

Lakhna, Etawah dis, N. W. P. 

Lakhnadon, 5,d. Seoni dis, C . P. 

Lakhnadon, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Lakhnauti, Saharunpur dis, N. W. P. 

irakhnesar, par, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 

Lakhni, Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Lakhpat, Cutch j. Bo. P. 

Lakhtar, tal, Jhalawad dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 



Lakhundar, r. C. I. A. 

Lakhundi, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Laki, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Laki, /. and s.d, Bannu dis, P. 

Lakkidi, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Lakkanwal, Gujrat dis, P. 

Lakoli, Gwalior r. C. L A. 

Laksam, Tipperah dis, B. 

Lakshmantirtha, r. Coorg, M. P. 

Lakshmeshwar, Miraj s. Bo. P. 

Lakshmipur or Lakhipur, Cachar, dis, A. 

Lakshmipur, /. Vizagapatam dis^ M. P. 

Laksin, Shahpur dis, P. 

Lakurdi, Burdwan dis, B. 

Lakvalli, tal, Kadur dis, Mysore /. M. P. 

Lalabazar, Sylhet dis, A. 

Lalamukh, Cachar dis, A. 

Lala Musa, Gujrat dis, P. 

Lalapet r.j. Trichinof>oly dis, M. P. 

Lalauli, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Lalbag, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Lai bag, Rungpore dis, B. 

Lalbag, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Lai Bagh, Nimar dis, C. P. 

Lalbara, Seoni dis, C. P. 

Lalbazar, s.d. Cooch Behar V. B. 

Laldarwaza, /. N. W. P. 

Lalganj, fair, Burdwan dis, B. 

Lalganj, Mirzapur dis, N . W. P. 

Lalganj, Mozufterpore dis, Behar, B. 

Lalganj, Partabgarh cUs, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Lalganj, s.d. Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Lalgarh, Bickaneer j. R. A. 

Lalgarh, e, C. I. A. 

Lalgola, Moorshedabad </<V, B. 

Lalgoshi, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Lalgudi, Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 

Lalia, Gonda</«J, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Lalian, Jhang dis, P. 

Laling, par, Khandesh dis. Bo. P . 

Lalitpur, cap, dis, & cant, N. W. P. 

Lai la, Ferozepore dis, P. 

Lallyan, h. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Lalmai, h. Tipperah dis, B. 

Lalpur, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Lalpur, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Lalpura, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Lalsot, dis, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Laluban, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Lai Udero, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Lalukdalani, A. 

Lamba, Jeypore /. R. A. 

Lamba^raon, Kangra dis, P. 

Lambai, par, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Lambdhar, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Lambi, Sirsa dis, P. 

Lambia/. Bashahr x. P. 

Lametaghat, /. Jubbulpore dis^ C. P. 

Lamhwa, Suftanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Lammi Khan, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Lamta, h. Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Landhaura, Saharunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Landhi, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Landi Khana, /. Khaibar, Afghanistan. 

Landour, san. Dehra Dun dis, N. W. P. 

Langai, r. and /. r. Sylhet dis, A. 



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( Ixiv ) 

Alphabetical Index 



Langaleshwar, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Langar Sarai, Muzaflfargarh dit, P. 

Langla, h, Sylhet dis, A. 

Langrin or Lyngkin, s. Ehasi and Jaintia Hills ^i>, A. 

Langulya, r. Ganjam dtt, M. P. 

Lanpur, ft, Kumaun ^ix, N. W. P. 

Lanja, Ratnagiri dis, Bo. P. 

Lanii, par, Bala^hat dis, C. P. 

Lankagar, ft, Midnapore dis, B. 

Lanktharai, h, Tipperah x. B. 

Lanwari, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Laober Sut, h. Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 

Laoboh, A, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 

Laosynnia, A, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 

Laowan, /ar, Durbhunga ^/t'x, Behar, B. 

Lapanga, Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Lapha, «. Bilaspur dis, C, P. 

Laphagarh, Yit, Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Lapli, r, Oodeypore x. R. A. 

Lar, Gorakhpur dis, N» W. P. 

Lar, Mooltan dis, P. 

Larawad, e. Bhopal s. C, I. A. 

Larkana, /a/. Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Larkhed, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Larsauli, Delhi dis, P. 

Lasalgaon, Nasik dis, B5. P. 

Lashkar, cap, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Lashkarpur, Sylhet dis, A, 

Laskarpur, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Lasnndra, Kaira dis, Bo. P. 

Laswaree, b./, Ulwur s, R. A. 

Laswina, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Lata, Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Latahur, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Lataki, Hazariba^^jx, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Latammar, cant, Bannu dis, P. 

Latehar, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Lathaban or De^, Bhurtpore x. R. A. 

Lathi, X. and /a/, Gohelwad dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Lathia, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 

Lat Masjid, ru, C. I. A. 

Latu, Sylhet dis, A. 

Latur, Hyderabad (Nizam's) 

Laun, t.c, Raipur dis, C. P. 

Laur, 0, n, d, Sylhet dis, A. 

Laur, Rewah x. C. I. A. 

Lauri, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Lauriya, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Lawa, X. R. A. 

Lawa, Jhelum dis, P. 

Lawada, Midnapore dis, B. 

Lawain, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Lawrencepur, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Laxmeshwar, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Layada, A. Singhbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Layari, r, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Laymayethna, Bassein dis, B. B. 

Lebong, /. Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Leda, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Leda, Umballa dis, P. 

Lego, Bankoora dis, B. 

Len, cap, Ladakh dis, Kashmir x. P. 

Leiah, /. and s,d, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Lemro, r, Akyab dis, B. B. 

Lena, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Lengitar Pahar, A. A. 



Lengjut, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis^ A. 

Leniya, /. and r, Mergui dis, B. B. 

Lesliganj, Lohardugga t/tx, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Lesraganj, Dacca <nx, B. 

Leteri, r. Nowgong dis, A. 

Lidar, r. Kashmir x. P. 

Lidhran, Jullundur dis, P. 

Likhi. X. Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Lilagar, r. Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Lilajan, r, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Lilajan, r, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Lilapur, Jhalawad dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Lilji, Rewah x. C. I. A. 

Lilwan, r, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Limn, ia/, j[halawad dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Linga, Persian Gulf. 

Lingagiri, e, Bastar x. C. P. 

Lingsugur, can/, Hyderabad (Nizams.) 

Lingti, Lahul x. Kangra dis, JP. 

Lio, Bashahr x. P, 

Lipu Kethan, /. Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Litar Gothra, /. Mewas x. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Little Baghmati, r. Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Little Conjevaran, Chingleput dis, M. P. 

Little Gandak, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Little Ranjit, r. Daijeeling dis, B, 

Liwali, Jeypore, x. R. A. 

Liwani, par, Indore x. C. L A. 

Lobha, par, Garhwal dis, N. W. P 

Lodhiica, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Lodhikhera, Chhindwara dis, C. P. 

Lodhma, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Lodhaganj, Dacca dis, B. 

Ix>dhran, Mooltan dis, P. 

Lodhrawala, Jhang dis, P. 

Lodikatra, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Loghasi, x. Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Lohagara, Jessore dis, B. 

Lohaghat, Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Lohajanga, r. Mymensingh dis, B. 

Lohara, par, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Lohara, z, Raipur dis, C, P. 

Lohara Sohaspur, «. Raipur, dis, C. P. 

Loharakandi, r, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Lohardugga, cap, and dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Lohargaon, Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Lohargarh, A, Jeypore x. R. A. 

Lohargarhji, p.p, Jeypore x. R. A. 

Loharu, x. P. 

Lohi, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Lohianwala, Gujranwala dis, P. 

Lohit, r, Sibsagar dis, A. 

Lohogarh, A, Jeypore x. R. A. 

Lahoner, par, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Lohraura, Rewah x. C. I. A. 

Lohughat, Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Lohwan, Jeypore x. R. A. 

Loisingh, «. Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Lokapavani, r, Mysore x. M. P. 

Lolan, A, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Lon, r, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Lonar, /./. and p.p, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Lonauli, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Loni, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Loni, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Loni, par, Meerutt^, N. W. P. 



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( Ixv ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



Loni Kalbhar, Poona dis. Bo. P« 

Loni Kandy Poona dis^ Bo. P. 

Lonjai, Nasik dis^ Bo. P. 

Lonsing, Furreedpore dis^ B. 

Lopoke, Amritsar dis^ P. 

Lora, Hazara dis^ P. 

Lonni, ial, Bilaspur </t>, C. P. 

Losal, Jeyi>ore s, R. A, 

Losar, Spiti s, Kangra dis^ P. 

Lotan, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Lotiy f.p, Radhanpur j. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Lovedale, san^ Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Lowaghar, h, Bannu dis^ P. 

Luckeeserai, r. s, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Lucknow, cap, dis, and div, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Ludana, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Ludania, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Luddan, Mooltan dis, P. 

Ludhiana, cap, cant, and dis, P. 

Ludurka, far, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Lughasi,^. Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Lugtana, Banda dis, N. W. P. 



Laeu, h, Hazaribagh^j, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Luha or Luka, r. Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis. A, 

Luhara, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Lukha Talao, Kohat dis, P. 

Luki, A. 

Lukmanpur, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Luliani, Lahore dis, P. 

Lumbaiyong, h, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 

Lnmsdenabad, Gjra dis, Behar, B. 

Luna, Rajpipla s» Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Lunawara, cap, and x. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Lund, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Lund], r. Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Lundikotal, Afghanistan 

Luni, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Luni, r. Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Lunmiani, Shahpur dis, P. 

Lunwa, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Lushai, h, Cachar dis, A. 

Lutana, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Ljrngkerdem, h. KhiBsi and Jaintia Hills dit. A* 



M. 

Mach, Kdat or Baluchistan. 

Machal, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Machalpur, par, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Madia Rewa, r. Seoni dis, C. P. 

Machher, Gwalior x. C. I .A. 

Madihid, h. Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Machhrehta, par, Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Machhu, Hallar dit, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Machhu Kanta, dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Machida, s. Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Madiigad, Belgaum </if. Bo. P. 

Madiiwal, Jhang dis, P. 

Maduwara,y^>, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Machknnd, p,p, Dholpur x. R. A. 

Machlishahr, Ja^^pur dis, N. W. P. 

Machna, r. Betul dis, C. P. 

Madirauli, Kamal dis, P. 

Madafadkere, Kadur dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Madakasira, tal, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Madalpur, Tumkur dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Madana, Rohtak dis, P. 

Madanapalle, /. and tal, Cuddapah dis, M. P. 

Madanganj, Dacca dis, B. 

Madanpur, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Madanpur, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

Madanpur, Monehyr dis, Behar, B. 

Madanpur, Nuddea dis, B. 

Madanpur, t. Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Madareepore, s,d. Furreedpore dis, B. 

Madarp;anj, RungpK>re dis, 6. 

Madan, par, Jalpaiguri dit, B. 

Madarkhat, A. 

Madarsa, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Madarpak, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Madbluivi, Belj^um dis. Bo. P. 

Maddagiri, h, Tumkur dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Madder, Upper Godavari dis, C. P. 

Maddur, Mysore dis, Mysore x. M. P. 



M. 

Madenad, Mercara tal, Coorg, M. P. 

Madh, h, Poona ^w. Bo. P. 

Madha, r. Fvzabad dit, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Madha, Sholapur dis. Bo. P. 

Madhanapalle, tal, Cuddapcdi dis, M. P. 

Madhavpur, Barda dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Madhawal, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Madhepur, Durbhimga dis, Behar, B. 

Madhi, Ahmednagar dit. Bo. P. 

Madhnagar, bed, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Madhoganj, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Madhogarb, /. and t,d. Jalaun dis, N. W. P. 

Madhogarh, Rewah x. C. I. A. 

Madhola, p,p, Teypore x. R. A. 

Madhoni, h, Bhurtpore x. R. A. 

Madhopur, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Madhorajpur, Jeypore x. R. A. 

Madhpuri, Mandla dis, C. P. 
Madhuban, Azamgarh dit, N. W. P. 
Madhuban, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 
Madhuban, /i2>, Hazaribagh //ix, Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Madhubani, Chumparun dit, Behar, B. 
Madhukhali, khal, Raishahye dis, B. 
Madhukhola, beel, Rajshahye dit, B. 
Madhumati, r, Furreedpore and Jessore dis, B. 
Madhupur, Bogra dit, B. 
Madhupur, Mymensingh dit, B.- 
Madhupur, Sonthal Pergunnahs dit, Behar, B. 
Madhupur, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Madhurantakam, tal, Chingleput dis, M. P. 
Madhu Tan, h, Chittagong Hill Tiacts dis, B. 
Madikerihalerinad, Mercara tal, Coorg, M. P, 
Madkotri, Bickaneer x. R. A. 
Madnapur, Shahjahanpur dis, N. W. P. 
Madni, Wardha dis, C. P. 
Madrani,y^>, C. L A. 
Madras, cap, dis, presidency and x, g, M. P. 
Madria, h, Banswara x. R. A. 



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( ixvi ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



M. 

Maduffnla, t. Viza^patam dit, M. F« 

Madukarai, r,s* Coimbatore <Aj, M. P. 

Madukarai, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Madura, cap^ and «/f>, M. P. 

Madurantakam, r,s Chingleput dts, M. P. 

Magadi, Bangalore dis, N^sore s. M. P. 

Magardaha, Kewah s, C. I. A. 

Magardha, Jubbulpore ^t>, C. P. 

Magarwara, Jhansi dit, N. W. P. 

Magdapur, far, Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Maghiana, Jhang dif, P. 

Maghra, /./. Patna ditf Behar, B. 

Magoora, /. and s.d, Jessore dis, B. 

Magori, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Magowa], Gujrat dis, P. 

Magra, dis, Sirohee s, R. A. 

Magra, Hooghly dis, B. 

Magrahat, 24-Pergunnah8 dis, B. 

Magraoli» Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Magrayar, /d:r, Unao dis, Oudh, N. W, P. 

Magroni, Jt, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Magsi, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Magura, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Mah,/ar, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Mahabal, A, Hazaribagh dis, Cfaota-Nagpore, B. 

Mahbal, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Mahaban, /./. Muttra dis, N. W. P. 

Mahabinayaka, A, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Mahableshwar, san, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Mahad, /a/, Colaba dis, Bo. P. 

Mahadayi, r. Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Mahadeo, A. and /./. Hoshangabod dis, C« P. 

Mahadeo, Nasik dis, Bo. P. 

Mahadeo, r. A. 

Mahadeogarh, /.^.i. Sawantwsuri s. Bo. P. 

Mahadevpur, Dinagepore dis, B. 

Mahadewa, par, Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mahag, "Dhsirw^r dis. Bo. P. 

Mahagaon, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Mahagaon, s. Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Mahagiri, A, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Mahanmadi>ur, Mymensingh ^ir, B. 

Mahajan, Bickaneer s. R. A. 

Mahakalidurga, A, Bangalore dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Mahal, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Mahalakshmi, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Mahalingpur, Mudhol s. Bo. P. 

Mahalla Sarkar Tirhoot, par^ Durbhui^ dis^ 

Behar, B. 
Mahal-masrud, par, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 
Mahal-shindogi, par, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 
Mahan, Akola dts, Berar, H. A. D. 
Mahanad, Hooghly dis, B. 
Mahanadi, or Mahanuddy, r. B. and C. P. 
Mahanadi, r. Ganjam dis, M. P. 
Mahanadi, n Rewah s, C. I. A. 
Mahanar, Mozufierpore dis, Behar, B. 
Mahane, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Mahanetanr, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Mahanga, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Mahanuddy, r. Jalpaiguri, Pumeidi and Maldah dis, B, 
Maharajdur^ ft, Hassan dis, Mysore s, M. P. 
Mahara^ganj, Gorakhpur dis, N. W, P. 
Maharajgan^, Patna dts, Behar, B. 
Mahara|ganj, Backergunge dis, B. 
Maharajganj, /./. Awungarh dis, N, W. P. 



M. 

Maharajganj, Rae Bareli dis, Oodh, N. W. P. 

Maharajganj, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Maharajpet, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Maharajpur, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Maharajpur, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Maharajpur, Mandla dis, C. P. 

Maharajpur, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Bdiar, B. 

Maharajpur, Maldah dis, B. 

Maharani, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Maharashtra, Bo. P. 

Maharowah, ca, Skikarpur dis, Sind, Ba P. 

Mahar Samod, A, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Maharua Gola, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mahasu, sui, of Simla, P. 

Mahata, Burdwan dis, B. 

Mahatpur, fair, Jullundur dis, P. 

Mahe, French Settlement M. P. 

Maheji, A, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Maheji, Ehandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Mahendraganj, Garo Hills dis, A. 

Mahendratanaya, r. Ganjam dis, M. P* 

Mahendru, Patna ^, Behar, B. 

Maher, A, and par, Gya dis, Behar, B, 

Maher, par, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Mahesar, //, Indore x. C. I . A. 

Maheshbathan, Nuddea dis, B. 

Maheshkhal, par, Chittasong dis, B. 

Maheshkhali, cAannel, Chitta^ong dis, B. 

Maheshmunda, Hazaribagh du, Chota-Ni^^pore, B. 

Maheshpur, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Maheshpur, Nuddea dis, B. 

Maheshpur, Umballa dis, P. 

Mahes Khali, r. A. 

Mahesro« Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Maheshtala, 24- Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Mahi, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Mahi, r. Banswara s, R. A. 

Mahi, r. Broach dis. Bo. P. 

Mahi, /. and r. Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Mahi, r, Sarun dis, Behar, B., 

Mahial, Mahikanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Mahidhar, /. Rajpipla s, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Mahidharpur, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Mahiganj, Rungpore dis, B. 

Mahiji, sA, Tonk s, R. A. 

Mahi Kanta, t,c, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Mahilpur, Hoshiarpur dis, P. 

Mahim, tal, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Mahinagar, par, Pnmeah dis, Behar, B. 

Mahind, par, Durbhanga dis, Behar, B. 

Mahirwa, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Mahishara, par, Bankoora dis, B. 

Mahiskhal, Chittagong dis, B. 

Mahldar Khan, Delhi dis, P. 

Mahjoi, Muttra dis, N. W. P. 

Mahm, Rohtak dis, P. 

Mahmudabad, par, SiUpor dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mahmud Kot, Muzafiargarh dis, P. 

Mahna, Ferozepore ^V, P. 

Mahnar, r. Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Mahoba, /. and s,d, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Mahoi, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Mahokhar, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Maholi, par, Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mahona, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Mahona, Jalaun dis, N. W. P 



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( Ixvii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



M. 

Mahona, par, Lucknow dis^ Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mahr, m, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Mahrabpur, Hyderabcid dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Mahrani, r, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Mahrauli, Delhi dis, P. 

Mahroni, /. and s,d. Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

Mahu, /or, Narsinghgarh s. C. I. A. 

Mahua-garhiy h, SonUial Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Mahud£^ Kaira dis. Bo. P. 

Mahul, par, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Mahuli, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Mahuli, Basti dir, N. W. P. 

Mahuli, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Mahuwa, Gohelwad du, Katt3rwar, Bo. P. 

Mahuwa, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Mahwa, dis, Jeypoie j. R. A. 

Maibelia, A. 

Maihar, s, Baghdkhand, C. I. A. 

Maikal, h. Mandla dis, C. P. 

Maikal,/.r. Mandla ^i>, C. P. 

Maikal, k, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Mailam, r.x. and A. South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Maileshvaram, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Mailog, s, Simla dis, P. 

Mailpati, North Arcot dit^ M. P. 

Mailsi, Mooltan dis, P. 

Maimara, Bnrdwan dis, B. 

Mainadahar, A. 

Mainadui, h, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Mainalli, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Maindai]|i, Kurundwad s. Bo. P. 

Mainpun, eap, and dis, N. W. P. 

Maira, Rawalpindi ^fj, P. 

Maira, Rewah x. C. I. A. 

Maivadi, s, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Maiyani, k, Chittagong Hill Tracte dis, B. 

Maiyar, r. Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Majali, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Majam, r. Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Maidighi, b€€l, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Ma^gaon, khal, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Mp.jham, r. Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P* 

Majhaoli, Delhi dis, P. 

Majhauli, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Majhaura, par, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Majhauwa, par, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Majhera, Muzaffamagar dis, N. W. P. 

Majhgawan, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Majhgawan, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Majhgawan, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Majhmban, Lohardugga dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Majhoi, r. Fytabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Majhua, par, Sonthal Peigunnahs dis, Behar, B, 

Majhuli, Rewah s, C. I. A. 

Majhwan, Cawnpore dis, N, W. P. 

Majida, Burdwan dis, B. 

Majidi, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Majigam, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Majitha, Amritsar dis^ P. 

Majoiganj, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Mapamutha,/ar, Midnapore <il^, B. 

Majra, Rohtak, dis, P. 

Majulipur, Sibsagar dis^ A. 

Makalpur, Hooghly dis, B. 

Makanpur, /./. Farrukhabad <fif, N. W. P, 

Makanpur, Cawnpou dis^ Nt W, P. 



Makanmdgarh, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Makardah, Howrah dis, B. 

Makarji, h, and tern. Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Makbaiah Paik, Delhi dis, P. 

Makh, Cutch s. Bo. P. 

Makhad, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Makhdumpur, Bara Banki dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Makhdumpur, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Makhdumpur, Mooltan dis, P. 

Makhdum Rashid, (air, Mooltan dis, P. 

Makhjan, Ratnagin dis. Bo. P. 

Makhla, Ellichpur dis, Berar, H. A. D, 

Makimpur, Jessore dis, B. 

Makhu, Ferozepore dis, P. 

Makrai, s, Hoenangabad dis, C. P. 

Makrain, par, Sonuial Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Makrandnagar, Farrukhabaid €iis, N. W. P. 

Maksudangarh, s, Bhopal s. C. I. A. 

Maksudan, Jullundur dis, P. 

Maksudo, r. Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Maksudo Rind, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Maksudpur, s. </. Furreedpore dis, B. 

Makundaprasad, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Mai, k, Surohee /. R. A. 

Malabar, dis and coast, M. P. 

Malabar-hiU, si^, Bombay city. Bo. P. 

Malaghat, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Mala^hat, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Malaipalaiyam, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Malakhera, Ulwur s. R. A. 

Malalin^pur, Mudhol s. Bo. P. 

Malambi, h. Yelsavirshime tal, Cooig, M. P. 

Malancha, r. 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Malanchi, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Malanga, Kungpore^f>, B. 

Malang Garh, Tanna dit. Bo. P. 

Malapahari, r. Belgaum dis, Bo. P. 

Malapuram, cant, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Malama, dis, Jeypore /. R. A. 

Malama, Chaur-ka, Jejrpore j. R. A. 

Malama, Dungar, Je]rpore s, R. A. 

Malatha, Colaba dis. Bo. P. 

Malaudb, far, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Malaut, Sirsa dis, P. 

Malawar, far, Rajgarh s, C. I. A. 

Malayagin, h, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Malda, par, Mon£h3nr dis, Behar, B. 

Maldachor, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Maldah, cap, and dis, Behar, B. 

Maldaha, Pubna dis, B. 

Maldwar, par, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Malegaon, Basim dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Mal^aon, Peint /. Bo. P. 

Malegaon, tal, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Malenpur, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Malekal Tirupati, h. Hassan dis, Mysore t, M. P. 

Malemana, ICanara dis. Bo. P. ' 

Maleni, r. C. I. A. 

Maler Kotla, s, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Malethu, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Malgi, Kanara dis^ Bo. P. 

Malgund, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Malhdasi, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo, P. 

Malhar, Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Malhargarh, Uwalior s. C. I. A. 

Malhaigarb, Jaora/. C. I. A. 



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( Ixviii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



M. 

Malhanr, Lacknow dif, Oudh, N. W. P. 

lAalhmgopaH, par, Bh£^par^i>,Behar, B. 

Mali, Mam Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Malia, Machhu-Kanta ^tj, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Malian, Amritsar </t>, P. 

Maliara, Burdwan </i>, B. 

Maliara, par, Bankoom dit, B. 

Malihabad, s,d. Lucknow dis, Ondb, N. W. P. 

Malikpur, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Malipota, Nuddea (fis, B. 

Malir, r, Karachi </«, Sind, Bo. P. 

Malirri, r. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Maliyapuram, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Malkapur, Buldana dis Berar, H. A. D. 

Malkapur, Slolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Malkhed, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Malki, pat, Mongh3rr dis, Behar, B. 

Mallanwala, Ferozepore dis, P. 

Mallanwan, par, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mallapur, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

MaUapuram, r,s. Salem dis, M. P. 

MaUayangudd, Belganm dis, Bo. P. 

Malochi, Pubna dTi^, B. 

Maloha, Umballa dis, P. 

Malpur, Khandesh dis Bo. P. 

Malpur, Mahi Kanta, Bo. P. 

Malpura, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Malpura, dis, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Malprabba, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Malprabha, r, Belgaum dis, Bo. P. 

Malsalami, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Malsej Ghat, A. Poona dif, Bo. P. 

Malsera, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Malsian, Jullundar dis, P. 

Malsiras, /a/, Sholapur dis. Bo. P, 

Malthon, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Maluchi, Dacca dis, B. 

Malud, j^r, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Malur, Kolar dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Malur, Mysore dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

MalvalIi,M ysore dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Malwa, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Malwa, t,c, Indore and Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Malwad, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Malwalli, K^ara dis. Bo. P. 

Malwan, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Malwa Tal, /. Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Malyapuram, Malabar dis, M, P. 

Mamandur, Chin£;leput dis, M. P. 

Mamandur, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Mamarpur, ferry, Delhi dis, P. 

Mamdapur, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Mamdapur, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Mamdipara, dee/, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Mamdot, Ferozepore dis, P. 

Mamoni, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Mamul, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Mamul, Upper Sind Frontier t^s, Sind, Bo. P. 

Man, Lahore dis, P. 

Man, Ludhiana^iV, P. 

Man, r. Berar, H. A. D. 

Man, r. Bheel Agency, C. I. A, 

Man, r, Sholapur </iV, Bo. P. 

Man, /a/, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Man, Tonk x. R. A. 

Mana, Amraoti^iV, Berar, H. A. D» 



M. 

Mana, Garhwal dis, N. W. P. 

Manabum* h, A. 

Manaf^oli, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Manai Maji, A. 

Manakmajra, Umballa dis, P. 

Manakwara, Elattywar dis, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Manamadi, North Arcot ths, M. P. 

Mana Madurai, Madura i£r, M. P. 

Manamalkudi, Taniore dis^ M. P. 

Manantoddy, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Mananwala, Gi^ranwala <^, P. 

Manaparai, Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 

Manas, r, Bpgra and Cooch Behar t^, B. 

Manas, r, A. 

Manasa, j^r, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Manatu, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Manauli, Umballa dis, P. 

Manauri, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Manawar, par, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Manbazar, s.d,, Manbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Manbha, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Manbhoom, par, and dir, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Manchar, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Manchar, Sholapur dis. Bo. P. 

Mancharda, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Ba P. 

Manchenhalli, Mysore dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Manchhar, r. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P« 

Manchikera, Kanara^, Bo. P. 

Mand, r, Aundh s, Satara dis, Bo. P. 

Manda, Rajshahye </ij, B. 

Mandad, Colaba dis. Bo. P. 

Mandakini, r, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Mandakini, r. N. W. P. 

Mandal, Ahmedabad dis, Bo. P. 

Mandal, Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Mandalay, cap, Burmah. 

Mandalgarh, ff, Oodeypore x. R. A. 

Mandangarh, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Mandaori, /./. Jeypore s, R. A. 

Mandar, A, Bhagalpur dis, Behar B. 

Mandar, Sirohee j. R. A. 

Mandar Mohana, estuary, Midnapore dis, B. 

Mandasa, m, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Mandauthi, Rohtak dis, P. 

Mandavgan, Ahmednagar dis, Ba P. 

Mandavgaon, Poona dts. Bo. P. 

Mandawa, Jeypore J. R. A. 

Mandawal, Jaora /. C. I. A. 

Mandawar, dis, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Manda war, par, Bijnor dis, N. W. P. 

Mandganw, Wardha dis, C. P. 

Mandhal, Nagpur</i>, C. P. 

Mandhardeo, Siatara dis. Bo. P. 

Mandhatta, Partabgarh dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mandhatta, i. Nimar dis, C. P. 

Mandheri, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Mandi s. P. 

Mandla, cap, and dis^ C. P. 

Mandladai, A, Seoni dis, C. P. 

Mandlesar, j{?. said par, Indore x. C. I. A. 

Mandleswari, /./. Shahabad dis, Behar. B. 

Mando, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Mandogarh, ru. and ft. Dhar s, C. I. A. 

Mandor, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Mandra, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Mandraet, dis, Keiowiee x. R. A* 



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( Ixix ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



M. 

Maodrak, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Mandnip, Sholapur dif, Bo. ?• 

Mandsaur, /. and dtt, Gwalior /. C. I. A. 

Mandu, Mahal Sirgira, s. Sambalpor dUf C. P. 

Mandvi, Cutch, s, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Mandvi, foA Surat dis, Bo. P. 

Madwa, e, Sankbera Mewas, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Mandya, Mysore diif Mysore s, M. P. 

Maneknatah, A, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Maner, par, Patna diSf Bebar, B. 

Mangd, Hazara dis, P. 

Mangal, s. Simla dis^ P. 

Man^a, r, Jessore dis, B. 

Mangalabetta, h, Mjrsore dis, Mysore s, M. P» 

Mangalagiri, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Mangalam, r,s, Coimbatore dis, M. V, 

Mangalawas, AJmere dis, R. A. 

Mangalbarl, /atr, Bogra dis, B. 

Mangaldai, s,d, Darrang dis, A, 

Mangalgiri, A. 

MangallawaSi Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Mangalkot, Burdwan dis, B. 

Mangalore, cap, and dis, M. P. 

Mangalpur, Burdwan dis, B. 

Mangalpur, Cawnpore dts, N. W. P. 

Mangalsi, par, Fyrabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mangalum, South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Mangalvedha, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Mangalvedha, Sangli, x. Bo P. 

Mangaon, Sawantwari s. Bo. P. 

Mangaon, /o/i.Colaba </fj, Bo. P. 

Mangarh, Colaba, dis. Bo. P. 

Mangari, Benares dis, N. W. P. 

Mangawan, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Mangja Tungya, A, Khand^h dis. Bo. P. 

Manglaur, par, Saharunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Mangli, Hazara dis, P. 

Mangor, y?. Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Mangroiy Sorath dis, Katt^war, Bo. P. 

Mangrotha, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Mangrol, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Mangrul Dastgir, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Mangrul Pir, /./. Basim dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Mangsuli, Belgaum dis, Bo. P. 

Mangtanwala, Lahore dis, P. 

Mannes, Gujranwala dis, P. 

Mania, Dbolpurx, R. A. 

Maniari, /./, Mozuiferpore dis, Bebar, B. 

Maniari, r. Bilaspur dts, C. P. 

Manil^[ar, Midnapore dis, B. 

Manickchak, Maldah dis, B. 

Manickgunge, s,d, Dacca dis, B. 

Manikaman, ieel, Durbhunga </i>, Bebar, B. 

Manikapur, par, Gonda. dis, Oudh N. W. P. 

Manikarayar, r. Madura dis, M. P. 

Manikar Char, A. 

Manikam, p,p, Kangra dis, P. 

Manikbazar, Burdwan dis, B. 

Manik Chak, par, Maldah dis, B. 

Manikchaura, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Manikpatna, par, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Manikpunj, par, Nasik dis, Bo. P. 

Manikpur, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Manikpur, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Manikpur, par, ParUbgarb dis, Oudb, N. W. P. 

Manikpur, /a/, Tanna dis, Bo. P. 



Maniktala, 34-Pergtimiahs </i>, 6. 
Manimajra, /air, and /./. Umballa dis, P, 
Manimukta, r. South Arcot dis, M. P. 
Manipur, cap, and s, A. 
Manirampur, Jessoie dis, B. 
Maniyachi, Tinnevell^ dis, M. P. 
Maniyar, Ghazipur dts, N. W. P. 
Manjaknppam, South Arcot dis, N. W. P. 
Maniarabad, ft, Hassan dis, Mysore s, M. P. 
Maniari, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 
Man^arkhed, Amrgoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 
Man^arsumba, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 
Man^ajrar, r. Tanjore dis, M, P. 
Man^eri, Malabar dis, M. P. 
Man^gvoii, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 
Man^hand, tal, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P, 
Man^hanpur, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 
Man^hi, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 
Manjhi, par, Sarun dis, Bebar, B. 
Manjiwala, Bannu dis, P. 
Manjri, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 
Maniut, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Manka, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Mankachar, Goalpara^iJ, A. 
Mankahri, Baghelkband, C. I. A. 
Mankali, Tonk s. R. A. 
Mankar, /air, Burdwan dis, B. 
Mankera, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 
Manki, Kanara ^t>, Bo. P. 
Mankulmanihari, Pumeah dis, Bebar, B. 
Manmad) Nasik dis. Bo. P. 
Mannalparai, Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 
Mannaigbat, p.s, Malabar dis, M. P. 
Mannaigudi, tal, Tanjore dis, M. P. 
Mannarkota, i. Tinnevelly dis, M. P* 
Mannarkudi, South Arcot dis, M. P. 
Manner, r, Nellore dis, M. P. 
Manohar, Kolhapur x. Bo. P. 
Manohar, /. A, t. Sawantwari s. Bo. P. 
Manoharpur, Jeyporex. R. A. 
Manoharpur, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 
Manohar Rai's Bazar, Furreedpore dis, B. 
Manoli, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 
Manoor, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 
Manora, Basim ^, Berar, H. A. D. 
Manora, /. Aou^e, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Manora, par^ Gva dis^ Bebar, B. 
Manorpar, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P* 
Manpur, British dis, C. I. A. 
Manpur, Chumparun dis, Bebar, B. 
Manpur, Teypore /. R. A. 
Manpur, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 
Manra, pai, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B, 
Mansa, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P> 
Mansai* r. Cooch Bebar x. B. 
Mansahra, Hazara dis, P. 
Manshai, Pumeah ^x, Bebar, B. 
Mansingh, A, Shahabad dis, Bebar, B. 
Mansarganj, Bhagalpur dis, Bebar, B. 
Mansuigai^, Goiakhpur dis, N. W. P, 
Mansumagar, Basti dis, N. W. P. 
Mansumagar, Lucknow dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Mansumagar, par, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W.P* 
Mantena, 1. Vizagapatam dis, M. P* 
Mnatesbwar, Burdwan dis, B. 
MantbOy Rongpore dis, B, 



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( Ixx ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



M. 



Mantir, Cnttack dis, OrisM, B. 

Manu, r, A. 

Manur, Ahmednagar dit, Bo. P. 

Man van, par, Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Manwar, r, Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Manwath, Hyderabcul (Nizam's.) 

Manyad, r. Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Mao, A. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Maoobin, Thonkwa dir, B. B. 

Maparwari, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Maraghat, /or, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Marai, Kohat du, P. 

Maramar Nadi, r. A. 

Maramutlu, Bowringoet or Kolar, r./. Mysore f. M.P. 

Marancapori, s. Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 

Marankari, A. 

Maraura, iar, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

Marda, Ghaopur</iV, N. W. P. 

Mardan, can/, Peshawur dir, P. 

Mardanpar, par, Bhopal s. C. I. A. 

Marehra, /ar, Etah dis, N. W. P. 

Marfi[alla, Rawalpindi dts, P. 

Marhal, par, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Mariadoh, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Mariahu, Jaunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Mariani, Sibsagar dis, A. 

Marichakandi, Tipperah dis, B. 

Marichap, r. 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Marichapali, Cuttack dir, Orissa, B. 

Marichpur, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Maridan, h, Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Mariyahan, Mirzapur ms, N. W. P. 

MarkBL, r. A. 

Marka, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Markacho, par, Hazariba^h dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Markanda, deel, Jessore dts, B. 

Markanda, r. Umballa dis, P. 

Markandeya, r. Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Markandi, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Markanum, South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Markapur, /ai, Kumool dis, M. P. 

Markuan, Jhansi, dis, N. W. P. 

Markundi, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Mar Nai, r, A. 

Maroth, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Marpha,^. Banda </w, N. W. P. 

Marsaghai, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Marsagram, Burdwan dis, B. 

Mam, Bili^ur dis, C. P. 

Marui, r. Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo, P. 

Marungapuri, m, Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 

Maruwalo, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P, 

Marwas, Ba^helkhand, C. I. A. 

Masalpur, dts, Kerowlee s, R. A. 

Masaurhi, par, Patna and Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Masdi, ^r, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Mashabil, plain, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B, 

Mashidwari, Colaba^^, Bo. P. 

Mashrak, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Masiidpur, par, Monghjrr dis, Behar, B« 

Maskan^ Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Maslandapur, Midnapore ^f/, B. 

Masnigudi, Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Masnudih, Hazaribagh dis, Cbota-Magpore, B« 

Massan, ySitr, Jhan^; dis, P, 

Masta, RuDgporci^, 6, 



M. 



Masn Bhhnrgari, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Ba P. 

Masuda, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Masulipatam, Kistna dir, M. P. 

Masur, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Masura, Ratniqriri dis, Bo. P. 

Masuwah, ca, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Mat, /ar, Muttra dis, N. W. P. 

Matabhanga, r. Nuddea and Moonhedabod dis, B« 

Matabhanga, s,d, Cooch-Behar 1. B. 

Matabhanga, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Mataji, sA. Tonk j. K. P. 

Matsikapura, Gwaliorx. C. I. A. 

Matamabari, r. Chittagong dis, B. 

Matanni, Peshawur dis, P. 

Matano Mad, Cutch s, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Matar, to/, Kaira dis. Bo. P. 

Matari, Hyderabad </t>, Sind, Bo. P. 

Mataundh, Banda //xV, N. W. P. 

Matberia, Backergunse dis, B. 

Matgoda, fair, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Math, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Matha, ^r, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore B. 

Mathania, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Matheran, Tanna <ft>. Bo. P. 

Mathesvara Malai A, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Mathra, Peshawur dis, P. 

Mathura,. Pubna dis, B. 

Mathuranathji, sA, Tonk s, R. A. 

Mathurapur, 24-Peigunnahs dis, B. 

Mathwar, e, C. I. A. 

Mati, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Matiar, A, A. 

Matiari, Pumeah</iV, Behar, B. 

Matiganj, Sylhet dis, A. 

Matigara, I>aijeelin^ dis, B. 

Matin, s. Bilaspur dis, C. P* 

Ma'tisiri, Salem dir, M. P. 

Matin Deva, A. Bilaspur i^, C. P. 

Matlabp^^ Tipperah dis, B. 

Matlakhali, Furreedpore ^tr, B. 

Matli, Hyderabad <&/, Sind, Bo. P. 

Mato, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Matri Kunrian, p,p, Oodeypore, «• R. A. 

Matta, Peshawur dis, P. 

Mattital, Mooltan dis, P. 

Matwad, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Mau, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Mau, Gwalioi /. C. I. A. 

Mau, Balaghat dis, C. P. 

Mau, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mau, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Mau, /. and s,d, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Mau, /. and s.d, Jhansi dir, N. W. P. 

Mau, Aima, Allahabad dis, N. W. P« 

Mau chibu, Banda ^, N. W. P. 

Maudha, /. and s.d. Hamirpui dis, N« W. P. 

Maudha, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Mauganj,/ar, Baghelkhand, C. I. A« 

Maugram, Burdwan dis, B. 

Mauhar, Fatehpur dis, N. W. P. 

Maulaganj, Gya dis, Behar B. 

Mau Mahoni, Jalaun dis, N. W. P. 

Maupur, Pubna dis, B. 

Mauranwan, par, Unao dis, Oudh N. W. P. 

Mau Nathbhanjan, Axamgarfa dis, N. W. P, 

Maushibai, Aundb #«^atitfE 1^1 Bo» P. 



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( Ixxi ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



M. 

MaTinkere betta, h, HasBan dis, Mysore x. If. P. 

Mavinkuma, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Mawai, Banda diSf N. W. P. 

Mawai, Unao //w, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mawai Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Mawai Moholara,/ar, BaraBanki</w, Oudh, N.W.P. 

Mawana, /.</. Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Mawaseka, Dungar, h, C. I. A. 

Maya, Fytabad ^w, Oudh, N, W. P. 

Mayadapur, ^ar^ Moorshedabad dif, B. 

Mayamantapur, RuD|gpore dis, B. 

Ma3ranachor, >0r, Midnapore diSf B. 

Mayapur, Burdwan dis, B, 

Mayavaram, to/, Tanjore dir^ M. P. 

Maygaon, Ahmednagar du. Bo. P. 

Mayna, Midnapore, dis, B. 

Mayna Mati, A, Tipperah dis, B. 

Maynaguri, s,d, JalpAiguri dis, B. 

Mayni, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Ma3nirakhi or Mayur, r. Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Mayurbhanja, Bailasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Ma3rureshwar, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Mazagon, Bombay ci/y, Bo. P. 

McDonald's Choultry, Salem dis, M. P. 

McLeodgani, BahaWalpur s. P. 

Medali, r. Oodeypore s, R, A, 

Medha, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Medhar, Surat dis, Bo. P. 

Medhasan, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Medleri, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Meeanee, d.f. Sind, Bo. P. 

Meean Meer, can/ and /air, Lahore dis, P. 

Meerut, can/, cap, and dis, N. W. P. 

M^hasani, A, Balasor^ dis, Orissa, B. 

M^hraj, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Meghwama, r. Colaba dis. Bo. P. 

Megna, r. B. 

Megnanapuram, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Megni, Jalaun dis, N. W. P. 

Menar, to/, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Mehdiganj, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Mehendiganj, Backerc^unge dis, B. 

Meherpore, s,d, Nuddea dis, B. 

Mehidpur, can/, Indore s. C. I. A. 

Mehkar, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Mehmadabad, /al, Kaira dis. Bo. P. 

Mehmangachhi, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Mehnagar, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Mehnar, /./. MoznfTerpore dis, Behar, B. 

Mehsi, par, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Mehunbara, par, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Meja, AUahabad dis, N, W. P. 

Mejarwali, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Mejia, Bankoora dis, B. 

Mekhali^^j s.d, Cooch Behar s, B. 

Mekliganj, Jalpai^ri dis, B. 

Mela^aiyam, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Melkotebetta, A, Hassan dis, Mysore /. M. P, 

Melpadi, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Melupaka, s. Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Melur, /./, Bangalore dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Melur /al, Madura dis, M. P. 

Men, r. Sankhera Mewas x. Bo. P. 

Mendki r, Kerowlee x. R. A. 

Menganapuram, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Meogarh, A, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 



M. 

Menshigndda, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Meppam, Malabar, dis, M. P. 

Merangi, s. Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Mercara, cap, and fal, Coorg, M. P. 

Mer£[ui, cap, and dis, B. B. 

Merkunad, s.d, Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Merta, Jodhpore x. R. A. 

Meruka, r. Dholpur x. R. A. 

Meruki, r. Dholpur x, R. A. 

Meruling, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Merkunad, t,c. Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Meruti, A, Kadur dis, Mysore x.M. P. 

Merwara, dis^ Ajmere, R. A. 

Mesana, Baroda x. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Mesri, r. Pandu Mewas x. Bo. P. 

Meswo, r, Ahmedabcul dis. Bo. P. 

Meswo, r. Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Metiaburui or Akra, 24-Pe^nnah8 dis, B. 

Metiari, Nuddea dis, B. 

Meting, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Metrathi, i. Coimbatore dis, M P. 

Mettupalaiyam, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Mewali, €. Pandu Mewas x. Bo. P. 

Mewat, Bhurtpore x. R. A. 

Mhais, r. C. I. A. 

Mhaladeyi, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Mhalungi, r. Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Mhasa, Ahmednagar dts, Ba P. 

Mhasa, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Mhasawad, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Mhasurli, Nasik dis, Bo. P. 

Mhaswa, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Mhhaswad, Satara dis. Bo, P. 

Mhesa, Chanda ^ix, C. P. 

Mhordan, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Mhow, cant, Indore x. C. I. A. 

Miagam, Baroda x. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Mianganj, Farrukhabad cUs, N. W. P. 

Miana Gondal, Shahpnr dis, P. 

Miani, Cutch x. Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Miani, Hoshiarpur, dis, P. 

Miani, Shidipur, dis, P. 

Miani, Sialkot dis, P. 

Mian Khel, Peshawur dis, P. 

Mianpur, Umballa dis, P. 

Mian wall, Bannu dis, P. 

Michamara, A. 

Midageshibetta, A, Tumkur 4^, Mysore x. M. 

Midh, Shahpur dis, P. 

Midnapore, cap, and dis, B. 

Mihan, r. Rewah x. C. I. A. 

Mihijan, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Mihndawal, Basti ^ix, N. W. P. 

Mikir, A, A. 

Milam, Knmaun dis, N. W. P. 

Milkipur, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mimisal, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Mina, r. Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Minachh, A, Jessore dis, B. 

Minakhan, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Minapur, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Mincninabad, Bahawalpur x. P. 

Mindha, Jodhpore x. R. A. 

Mindhala, r. Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Mindhawal, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Miradongar, Colaba dis. Bo. P. 



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( Ixxii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



M. 

Mlraj, s. Bo. P. 

Mira| Prant, par, Belganm dis, Bo. P. 

Mirajgaon, Ahmednagar ^i>, Bo. P. 

Mirak, Montgomery Sis, P. 

Miran, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

MiranChahaltan,/./. Tonk j. R. A. 

Miran Ghati, Kaiiial dis, P. 

Miran ki Sarai, Famikhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Miranpur, MuzafTarnagar dis, N. W. P. 

Miranpur Katra, par, Shahjahapur dis, N. W. P. 

Mirapara, Jessore dis, B. 

Mirawali, Ahmednagar dis, Bo. P. 

Mirganj iar, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Miignatn, Gwaliorj. C. I. A. 

Mirgoda/ar, Balasore </fV, Orissa, B. 

Mir Golam-Alijo-Tando, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P* 

Miri, Ahmednagar dis, Bo. P. 

Miri, A, A. 

Mirian, Bannu dis, P. 

Mirjan, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Minanhat, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Mirkadim, Dacca dis, B; 

Mirpur, Hazara dis, P. 

Mirpur, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Mirpur, Nuddea dis, B. 

Mirpur, tal, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Mirpur Batoro, /a/, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Mirpur Khas, tal, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P, 

Mirpur Sakro, tal, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Miro Mari, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Mir'ki-sarai, Chittagong dis, B. 

Mirwah, ca, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P* 

Mirya, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Mirzaganj, Backergunge dis, B. 

Mirzamurad, Benares dis, N. W. P. 

Mirzapore, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Mirzapur, cap and dis, N. W. P. 

Mirzapur, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Mirzapur, Shahjahanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Mirzapur Chauhari, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Misan, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Mishmi, k, A. 

Mishrikoti, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Mirsauliya, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Mbrikh, s, d. Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Missadaera, Rawalpindi <i&>, P. 

MitauU, Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

MithaKhan-jo-Tando, Thar and Parkar</{j,Sind, Bo. P. 

Mithalak, Shahpur dis, P. 

Mithakua, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Mthalak, Shahpur dis, P. 

Mithankot, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Mitha Tiwana, Shahpur dis, P. 

Mithri, Jodhporex. R. A. 

Mithrau r, iW and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Mitru Mooltan dis, P. 

Mitti, tal, Thar and Parkar dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Mittri, Kelat, or Baluchistan 

Miyanganj, Famikhabad dis, N, W. P. 

Mo, Gwalior s, C. I. A, 

Moar, Midnapore dis, B. 

Mochal Amritsar dis, P. 

Mochh, Bannu dis, P. 

Modalaipati, s. Salem dis, M* P. 

Modnimb, Miraj s. Bo. P. 

Moga, Ferozepore dis, F» 



Mogallur, Nellore dis, M. P* 

Mogaltur, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Moghal Sarai, Benares dis, N. W. P. 

Mogra, Jodhpore, j. R. A. 

Mohamdi, Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mohan, s.d. Unao dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mohan, r. Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mohan Auras, par, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P* 

Mohand, Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Mohanganj, par, Unao dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mohanganj, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Mohanganj, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mohan^h, Jeysulmere dis, R. A. 

Mohania, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Mohanka, Ferozepore dis, P. 

Mohanlalganj, s.d, Lucknow dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mohanpur, Etah dis, N. W. P. 

Mohanpur, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Mohanpur, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Ba P. 

Mohanpur, Midnapore, dis, o. 

Mohar, r, Kaira dis, Bo. P. 

Mohari, Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Moharli, Chanda^^, C. P. 

Mohbat Dero Jatoi, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Ba P. 

Moheshpur, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Moheshrakha, Howrah dis, B. 

Moh^on, Chhindwara dis, C. P. 

Mohipura, Barwani, s, C. I. A. 

Mohkher, Chhindwara dis, C. P« 

Mohol, Sholapur dis. Bo. P. 

Mohpa, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Mohpani, Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

Moj, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Gujarat, Ba P. 

Mokahmeh, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Mokamtala, Bogra dis, B. 

Mokandpur, Jullundur dis, P. 

Mokbhangi, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Mokhara, Tanna</t>, Bo. P. 

Mol, A, and r. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Molagul, A. 

Molan, Banswara, s. R. A. 

Molkalmuru, Chitaldroog dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

MoUarhat, Jessore dis, B. 

Mollarpur, Beerbhoom </w, B. 

Molong-kong, Naga Hills dis, A. 

Molpur,/wV, Beethhoom dis, B. 

Moman, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Mominabad, Hyderabad, (Nizam's.) 

Momna Musawwir, /./. Tonk s. R. A. 

Monair, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Mondha, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 

Mondha, Allahabad ^6V, N. W. P. 

Mondra, A, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Monghyr, cap, dis, ondpar, Behar, B. 

Moniat, Dacca dis, B. 

Monier Khal, cant. Cachar dis, A. 

Monihari, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Montgomery, caf, and dis, P. 

MooiS^ee, d,jf, Ferozepore dis, P. 

Moolky, South Kanara dis, M. P. 

Mooltan, cap, cant and dis, P. 

Moonsheegunge, s,d, Dacca dis, B. 

Moorshedabad, cap, and dis, B. 

Mor, r. Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Mora, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Morab, Dharwar dis, Bo. P. 



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( Ixxiii ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



M. 

Moradabad, cap, cant^ and flfiw, N. W. P, 

Moran, r. Hoshangabad dis^ C. P. 

Moran, r, Jeypore s. R. A. 

MorappuTi Salem dis, M. P. 

Morar, cant, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Morasa, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Mordhar, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Morel, r. Eerowlee j. R. A. 

Morelgang, Jessore dis, B. 

Morh^, r. Hazaribagh and Gja dis^ B. 

Mori, h, Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Morinda, UmbaJIa dis, P. 

Morkariman, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Morna, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Moraa, r. Aundh s. Satara dis^ Bo. P. 

Morna, r. Berar, H. A. D. 

Moml, Umballa <rVx, P. 

Moro, ial, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Morsi, Amraoti diSy Berar, H. A. D. 

Mortakka, /. and s,d, Nimar dis, C. P. 

Morthal,/ar, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Morvi, /a/, Machhu Kanta dis, Kattywar, Bo. P, 

Morwah kalan, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Morwah khurd, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar B. 

Morwara, Radhanpur s, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Mosam, r. Bo. P. 

Moshi, Sholapur dis. Bo. P. 

Mota, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Mota, Surat dif, Bo. P. 

Motala, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Motebennur, Dharwar dis, Bo. P. 

Moth, /. and s.d, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Motiganj, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Motigudda, Kanara ^2>, Bo. P. 

Motiharee, c,s. and s,d, Chumpanin dis, Behar, B. 

Motijhama, waterfall^ Sonthal Pergunnahs dis^ 

Behar B. 
Moti Jhil, /. Bhurtpore s. R. A. 
Motipur, Bahraich </w, N. W. P. 
Motipur, MozufTerpore dis, Behar, B. 
Moti TaJa, Sawantwari s. Bo. P. 
Motitalab, /. Mysore dis^ Mysore s, M, P, 
Motri, h, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Motur, h, Chhindwara <tf J, C. P. 
Moulmein, or Maulmain cap, Amherst dis, B. B. 
Mowar, Nagpur dis, C. P. 
Mowkhera, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 
Moyula Bhanja, h, Cuttack dis, Orissa B. 
Mozufferpore, cap, and dit, Behar, B. 
Mubarak Laghari, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P* 
Mubarakpur, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 
Mubarakpur, Hoshiarpurr/w, P, 
Mubarakpur, par, Umballa dis, P. 
Mubarakpur, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 
Much, Bannu dis, P. 
Much, Dera Ghazi Khan dis^ P. 
Muchia, Maldah dis, B. 
Mudakudore, Mysore s. M. P. 
Muddanur, Cuddapah dis, M. P. 
Muddebihal, tal, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 
Muddehpoora, c,s, Bhagalpur dis^ Behar, B. 
Mudgeri, Kanara dis. Bo. r. 
Mudhol, /. Bo. P. 

Mudhoobunnee, c,s, & s,d. Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 
Mudhoobunnee, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 
Mudimadagabetta A. Kols^ dis^ Mysore s, M. P. 



M. 

Mud-pointy 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 
Mufti-ka-purwa, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 
Mugdai, spring, Chanda dis, C. P. 
Mugger Peer, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Mughalbhim, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Mughalpur, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 
Mughalpura, Patna dis, Behar, B. 
Mughal Sarai, Benares dis, N. W. P. 
Mugud, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 
Mugur, Mysore dis, Mysore t. M. P. 
Mugutkhan Hubli, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 
Muhamdi, j.^. Kheri^iV, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Muhammadabad, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 
Muhammadabad, Fatehgarh dis, N. W. P. 
Muhammadabad, par, Farrukhabad dis, N. W. P. 
Muhammadabad, par, Sonthal Pergunnahs <Us, Be- 
har, B. 
Muhammadabad, s.d. Azamzarh dis, N. W. P. 
Muhammad Bazar, Beerbhoom dis, B. 
Muhammadgarh, s. Bhopal a., C I. A. 
Muhammad nagar, Balasore </iV, Orissa, B. 
Muhammadpur, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P, 
Muhammadpur, Jessore dis, B. 
Muhammadpur, /ar, Rajshahye ^eV, B. 
Muhammadpur, par, Bara Banki</{V, Oudh, N. W. P, 
Muhammadzai, Kohat dis, P. 
Muharanwala, Montgomery dis, P- 
Muharli, Chanda dis, C. P. 
Muhibb Alipur, Patna dis, Behar, B. 
Muhpa, Nagpur dii, C. P. 
Mujnai, r. Jailpaiguri dis, B. 
Mukarrabpur, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 
Mukerain, Hoshiarpur dis, P. 
Mukhai, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Mukhra, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B, 
Mukhthul, Hyderabad (Nizam's) 
Muktagacha, Mymensingh dis, B. 
Muktipur, Rungpore dis, B. 
Muktsar, Ferozepore dis, P. 

Mukundpur, par, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B, 
Mul /. and s,d, Chanda //ij, C. P. 
Mula, r. Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 
Mula, r. Poona dis. Bo. P. 
Mulagol, Sylhet dis, A. 
Mulaingiri, h. Kadur dis, Mysore f . M. P. 
Mulana, par, Umballa dis, P. 
Mulapal, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Mulazai, Bannu dis, P. 
Mulbagal, Kolar<//j, Mysoie J. M. P. 
Mulbagalbetta, h, Kolar dis, Mysore, /. M. P. 
Mulgan, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 
Mulgund, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 
Mulher, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 
Muli, tal, Jhalawad dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 
Muliapahar, h, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 
Mullazai, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 
Multai, /. and s.d, Betul dis, C. P. 
Multhan, Bhcel a. C. I. A. 
Mulwad, Kaladgi ^/j. Bo. P. 
Munanwan, Lahore dis, P. 
Mundargi, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 
MundgcS, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 
Mundia, Muzaffargarh dis, P. 
Mundahal, Hissar dis, P. 
Mundamuhan, /<r/ry, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Mundargi, Dhaiwar<//i, Bo. P. 



Digitized by 



Google 



( Ixxiv ) 



Alphabetical index. 



M. 

Mundeti, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Mundgod, Kanara dis, Bo. P. 

Mundharva, Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Mundi, Nimar dis^ C. P. 

Mundiagarh, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Mundikhel, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Mundka, Delhi dis, P. 

Mundlana, Rohtak dis, P. 

Mundra, Cutch s. Bo. P. 

Mundrani, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Mungalum, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Mungeli, /. and s,d. Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Mungra Badshahpur, Jaunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Mungrul Pir, Basim dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Mungus, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Munjeshwar, South Kanara dis, M. P. 

Muniyar, r. Nellore, dis, M. P. 

Muniyer, r. Kistna dis, M. P. 

Munjpur, Radhanpur s. Bo. P. 

Munj Sagar, /. Bheel a. C. I. A. 

Munshiganj, Nuddea^tV, B. 

Munshihat, Noakholly dis, B. 

Muradi, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Muradnagar, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Muradnagar, Tipperah dis, B. 

Muragachha,y&/r, Nuddea ^ij, B. 

Muraligunj, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Muralgi, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Muramgaon, s, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Murappanad, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Murarai, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Murarai, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Murassarpur, Partabgarh dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Muratganj, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Murawad, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 

Murbad, /a/, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Murdeshwar, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Murghai, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Murgiyatongari, Ilazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagporei B. 

Murgod Prant, /ar, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Muridke, Lahore <//j, P. 

Mumad, Mercara (a/, Coorg, M. P. 

Murree, san, and cani, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Mursan, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Murtaza, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Murtazapur, Amraoti dis, Berar, II. A. D. 

Murthal, Delhi dis, P. 



Murud, Ratnaguri dis. Bo. P. 

Murad Janjira, Ratnagiri, dis. Bo. P. 

Murugmale, A, Kolar dis, Mysore i. M. P. 

Murwal, B&ndu dis, N. W. P. 

Murwara, /. and s, d, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Musafirkhana, s, d, Sultanpur ^iV, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Musa Khel, Bannu dis, P. 

Musanagar, Cawnpore, dis, N. W. P. 

Muscat, Arabia. 

Musela, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Mushi, r. Nellore dis, M. P. 

Musigeri, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Musiri, Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 

Muskara, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Muski, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Mussooree, san, Dehra Dun dis, N. W. P. 

Mussowli, Bara Bank! dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Mustafabad s,d, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Mustafabad, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh N. W. P. 

Mustafabad, Umballa dis, P. 

Mustafapore, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Muswan, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Mutakidabad, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Mutakidnagar, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Mutakidpatna, par, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Mutanchetti Mitta, «. Salem dis, M. P. 

Mutaur, par, Fatehpur dit, N. W. P. 

Mutgi, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Mutla, r. 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Muttra, cant, cap, dis, wcid p,p. N. W. P. 

Mutha, r. Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Mutukalatur, Madura dis, M. P. 

Mutupit, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Muzatfarabad, Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Muzaffargarh, cap, dis, and p,f» P. 

Muzafiamagar, cap, and dis, N. W. P. 

Mozang, Lahore dis, P. 

Myanoung, Henzada dis, B. B. 

Mylam, South Arcot dis, M. P, 

Mylapore, Madras city, M. P. 

Mymensingh, cap, and dis, B. 

Mynagarh, Midnapore dis, B. 

Mynaguri, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Mynanagar, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Mypady, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Mysadul, par, Midnapore dis, B, 

Mysore, pr, dis, and x. M. P. 



N. 

Nababganj, Dacca, dis, B. 

Nababganj, Dinagepore dis, B. 

Nababganga, r, Jessore dis, B. 

Nabha, s. P. 

Nabigani, p,s, Sylhet dis, A. 

Nabiganj, par, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Nabinagar, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Nabinagar, Tipperah dis, B. 

Nabisat, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Nachana, Jeysulmere s. R. A. 

Nachangaon, Wardha ^iV, C. P. 

Nadai, bed, Rajshahye dis, B. 



N. 

Nadala, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Nadanghat, Burdwan dis, B. 

Nadaun, Kangra dis, P. 

Nadbai, Bhurtpore s, R. A. 

Nadgund, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Nadol, Jodhpore j. R. A. 

Nadrai, Etah, dis, N. W. P. 

Naduvatam, plantation, Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Nag, r. Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Naga, A, A. 

Nagaghully, Lakhimpur, dis, A. 

Naga Hills, dis, A. 



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( Ixxv ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



N. 

Nagal, Bijnor /6V, N. W. P. 

Nagal, par, Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Nagalapunun, 2. Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 
Nagalwari, par, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Nagamangala, Hassan </fx, Mysore s, M. P. 

Nagan, Tonk j. R. A. 

Nagar, m, r, Tubbulpore </t>, C. P. 

Nagar, i/is, Bhurtpore, x. R. A. 

Nagar, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Nagar, r. Rajshahye dis, B. 

Nagar, Shimoga dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Nagar, /a/, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Nagar, Thar and Parluir dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Nagara, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Nagaram, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Nagar Bari, M3rmensingh dis, B. 

Nagar Basti, see Samastipur. 

Nagarbeha, A. 

Nagardas, p,p. Basim dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Nagardeola, Khandesh dis, Bo, P. 

Nagari, /. r, and A, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Nagaria, Etah dis, N. W. P. 

Nagarikatakam, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Nagar- Kiari, par, Msmhhoom dis, Chot-Nagpore, B. 

Nagarnausa, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Nagar Parkar, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Nagarpur, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Nagaur, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Nagavali, r. Ganjam dis, N. W. P. 

Nagbhir, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Nagela, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Nagercoil, Travancore dis, M. P. 

Nageshwar, p.p. Bheel a. C. I. A. 

Nageshwari, Rungpore dis, B. 

Naghbeer, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Nagina, Bijnor dis, N. W. P. 

Nagina, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Nagli, Gurgaon dts, P. 

Nagnesh, Jhalawad dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Nago, h, Jodhpore x. R. A. 

Nagode, can/, and x. Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Nagore, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Nagothna, Kolaba dis. Bo. P. 

Nagpahar, A. Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Nagphani, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Nagpur, cap, dis, and x.^. C. P. 

Nagpur, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Nagra, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Nagraon, Lucknow dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Nagri, Wardha dis, C. P. 

Nagri, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Nagrikatakam, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Nagsiddh, Satara/^x, Bo. P. 

Nagwan, see Egra. 

Nahakhanda, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Nahan, Sirmur x. P. 

Nahan, Umballa dis, P. 

Nahara, €, Pandu Mewas x. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Naharani, A. 

Nahargarh, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Nahargarh,/?. Tonk x. R. A. 

Naharmau, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Nahra r. Balaghat dis, C. P. 

Nahwai, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Naidupet, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Naigawan Ribai,/ Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 



N. 

Naihati, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Naina Kot, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Naini, AUahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Naini, r. Jaipur dis, C. P. 

Naini Tal, san, Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Nainsukh, f. P. 

Naipur, par, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Nairi, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Naisang, Kamal dis, P. 

Nai-sarai, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Naiya r. Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N, W. P. 

Najafgarh, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Najafgarh, Delhi dis, P. 

Najibabad, Bijnor dis, N. W. P. 

Nakachari, Sibsagar dis, A. 

Nakadahabil, dee/, Burdwan dis, B. 

Nakalia, Pubna dis, B. 

Nakasipara, Nuddea dis, B. 

Nakeshwarbari,/«>, Darjeeling r//x, B. 

Nakhtrana, Cutch x. Bo. P. 

Nakkapilli, «. Vizagapatam dis, M. P, 

Nakkati, dee/, Rajshahye dis, B, 

Nakna, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Nakodar, Jullundur dis, P. 

Nakol, Jessore dis, B. 

Naktaura, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Nakur, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Nakur, s,d, Saharanpur dis, N. W. P, 

Nal, Gwalior X. C. I. A. 

Nal, Mewas /. Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Nal, r, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P, 

Nalagarh, Hindur x. P. 

Nalatwad, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Nalawura, r. Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Nalbari, Eamrup dis, A. 

Nalchha, par, Dhar x. C. I. A. 

Nalchera, NoakhoUy dis, B. 

Nalchirar dona, AAal, Noakholly dis, B. 

Nalchitti, Backergunge dis, B. 

Naldanga, Jessore dis, B. 

Naldanga, Kungpore dis, B. 

Nalera, Jhang dts, P. 

Nalganga, r, Berar, H. A. D. 

Naihati, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Nalia, e, Sankhera Mewas x. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Nali Chanda, par, Manbhoom dis, Ch-Nagpore B, 

Nalini, r, M)rsore x. M. P. 

Naliya, Cutch x. Bo. P. 

Nalkhera, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Nalknad, Padinalknad fai, Coorg, M, P. 

Nalkuli, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Nallur, Bangalore dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Nalta, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Namakal, /a/, and z. Salem dis, M. P. 

Nammal, Bannu dis, P. 

Nam pur, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Namshu, /air, Daijeeling dis, B. 

Namti or Nyamti, Shimoga, dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Namtidal, A. 

Nanai, r. Nowgong dis, A. 

Na Nadi, f. A. 

Nanakmata, Tarai dis, N. W. P. 

Nanane-ki-nadi, r. Kerowlee x. R. A. 

Nanauta, Saharunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Nancherla, r.s. Bellary dis, M. P. 

Nancowry, Nicobars, Bay of Bengal. 



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( Ixxvi ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



N. 

Nand, Ajmere dit^ R. A. 

Nand, r. Nagpur dis^ C. P. 

Nandakuja, r. Rajshahye </i>, B. 

Nandala, Pooree liis^ Orissa, B. 

Nandalur, Cuddapah dis^ M. P. 

Nandardhan, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Nandarva, Lunawara s, Rewa Kanta Bo. P. 

Nandavaram, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Nander, dis^ Hyderabad (Nizam's) 

Nandgad, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Nandganj, Ghazipur disy N. W. P. 

Nandgaon j. Raipur dis^ C. P. 

Nandgaon, /fl/, Nasik <//>, Bo. P. 

Nandgaon Kazi, Amraoti dis^ Berar, H. A. D. 

Nandgaon Pelh, Wun dis^ Berar, U.* A. D. 

Nandigam, z, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Nandigama, /a/, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Nandigram, Midnapore dis^ B. 

Nandikatta, Kanara dis, Bo. P. 

Nandikotkur, tal, Kurnool dis^ M. P. 

Nandini, r. Mysore s, M. P. 

Nandna, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Nandod, Rajpipla s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Nandoli, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Nandukan, Sunth j. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Nandur, Ahmednagar r/iV, Bo. P. 

Nandura, Wun and Buldana dis^ Berar, H. A. D. 

Nandubar, tal, Khandesh dis^ Bo. P. 

Nandur Pathar, Ahmednagar disy Bo. P. 

Nandur Singota, Nasik dis^ Bo. P. 

Nandur Vaidya, Nasik dis^ Bo. P. 

Nandwai par, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Nandyal, /a/, Kurnool dis, M. P. 

Naneghat, Tanna.f//j, Bo. P. 

Nangal, Lahore dis, P. 

Nangalar Tup, A. 

Nangal Dunna Singh, Gujranwala dis, P. 

Nangam, e, Sankhera Mewas f. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Nanga Parbat, A, Kashmir s, P. 

Nangarecha, Cutch, x. Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Nangloi, Delhi dis, P. 

Nangpoh, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 

Nanguneri, tal, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Nanihat, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Nanjangud, Mysore dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Nanjarajpatna, cap, and dis, Coorg, M. P. 

Nankana, /air, Lahore r/i>, P. 

Nannilam. /«/, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Nanpara, s.d, Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Nanpur, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar B. 

Nansari, z. Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Nanu, Aligarh^w, N. W. P. 

Nanu, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Naodwar, f.r, Kamrup dis, A. 

Naohata, Rungpore dts, B. 

Naokhila, c.s, Bogra dis, B. 

Naosari, Baroda s. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Napad, Kaira dis. Bo. P. 

Napokhi, Padinalknad tal, Coorg, M. P, 

Napu, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Napuchar, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Nara, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Nara, Hazara dis, P. 

Nara, Lc. and r. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Narada, r. Rajshahye dis, B. 

Naragunti, «. North Arcot dis^ M. P. 



Narai, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Narail, par, Jessore dis, B. 

Naraina, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Narainganj Umballa dis, P. 

Naraingarh, Umballa dit, P. 

Naraini, Banda dit, N..W. P. 

Narainpett, Hyderabad (Nizam's.) 

Narainvaram, r. North Arcot. dit^ M. P. 

Naraj, h. Cuttack dss, Orissa, B. 

Narajol,/ar, Midnapore </«, B. 

Naraoli, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 

Narasinganpet, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Narasingarayapetta, North Acort dis^ M. P. 

Naraya, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Narayandanri, Midnapore dis, B. 

Narayanavaram, r. and / North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Narayangani, Mandla dis, C. P. 

Narayanganj, Dacca dis, B. 

Narayangaon, Poona. dis, Bo. P, 

Narayangar, par, Midnapore dii, B. 

Narayangarh, par, Indore s, C. I, A. 

Narayanpur, can, Midnapore dis, B. 

Narayanpur, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Narayanpur, 24-Pergunnahs^, B. 

Narayanpur, Ulwur s. R. A, 

Narayan Sarowar, Cutch s, Kattjrwar, Bo. P. 

Narayan*s Hat, Chittagong dis, B. 

Naraynandagiri, Bellary dis, M, P. 

Nardigudd, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Nare^, Dharwar dis, Bo. P, 

Narel, Sirsa dis, P. 

Narendra, Dharwar dis, Bo. P. 

Narendrapur, Howrah dis, B. 

Narga, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Nargaon, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Narghat, Midnapore dis, B. 

Narhan, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Narhan, par, Sarun dis, Behar, B, 

Narhar, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Narhat, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

Narhat, par, Gya and Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Nari, r. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Nariad, /a/, Kaira dis, Bo. P. 

Naridigar, par, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Narkher, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Narki, Agra dis, N. W.-P. 

Namala, san, Akola dit, Berar, H. A. D. 

Namaul, Patiala s. P. 

Namaul r. P. 

Naro r. Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Naroli, Kerowlee s, R. A. 

Naroia, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Narot, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Narowal, Sialkot <//>, P. 

Narra z. Raipur dis, C. P. 

Narsannapet, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Narsapatnam, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Narsapur, Bangalore dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Narsapur, /a/, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Narsaraopet, fai, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Narsingdih, Dacca dis, B. 

Narsingha, A, Seoni dis, C. P. 

Narsinghgarh, j. Bhopal, a, C. I, A. 

Narsinghgarh, Damon dis, C. P. 

Narsinghpur, cap ,and dis, C. P. 

Narsinghpur, /.x. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 



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Google 



( Ixxvii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



N. 

Narsinghpur, Tipperah iiis, B. 

Narsinghpur, Sholapur dis, Bo. P. 

Narsingh Wari, Kolhapur j. Bo. P. 

Narsipur, Hassan dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Narsipur, Mysore dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Narsoba Wari, Kolhapur, s. Bo. P. 

Narsunda r. M]nnensingh dis, B. 

Nanili Mooltan dis, P. 

Narwal, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Narwar, dis, andy?. Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Narwar, e. Western Malwa a. C. I. A. 

Narsarpur, Hyderabad du^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Nashipur, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Nasigram, Burdwan dis, B. 

Nasik, caPf and dif, Bo. P. 

Nasirabad, c.s, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Nasirabad, /a/, Khandesh dis^ Bo. P. 

Nasimagar, Tipperah dis, B. 

Nasirpur, Partabgarh dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Narsirpur, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Nasirujial, par, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Nasirwah, ca, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Nasrat, r. Shikarpar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Nasrida, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Nasriganj, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Naswari, e. Sankhera Mewas s. Rewa-Eanta, Bo. P. 

Nateputna, Sholapur dis, Bo. P. 

Nathana, Ferozepore dis, P. 

Nathdwara, sA. Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Nathpur, par, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Nathupur, Delhi <^i,r, P. 

Nathupur, par, Azamgarh a&j, N, W. P. 

Natiaipali, Hazara^/ij, P. 

Nattore, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Natuda. Nuddea dis, B. 

Naubacha, A. 

Naubatpur, T&tn&dis, Behar B 

Naudiha, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore B. 

Naugaon, e. Western Malwa a. C. I. A . 

Naukhera, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Naukuchia Tal, Kumaun dir, N. W. P. 

Naulakha, Lahore dis, P. 

Naulakh Umbra, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Naulana, e. Western Malwa a. C. I. A. 

Nauli, Kaira dis. Bo. P. 

Naultha, Karnal dis, P. 

Naundero, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Nauni, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Naupada, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Naurang, r. Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Naurangabad, Gujrat dis, P. 

Naurangabad, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Naushahra, Amritsar dis, P. 

Naushahra, Gujranwala dis, P. 

Naushahra, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Naushahra, Shah pur dis, P. 

Naushahro, /a/, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Naushahro, fat, Shikarpur dir, Sind, Bo. P. 

Nawabganj, Bara Banki dis, Oudh N. W. P. 

Nawabganj, Cawnpore rfw, N. W. P. 

Nawabganj, Etah dis, N. W. P. 

Nawabganj, /ar, Allahabad ^2>, N. W. P. 

Nawabganj, par, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Nawabganj, Farrukhabad diz, N. W. P. 

Nawabganj, Farrukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Nawal^anj, par, Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 



N- 

Nawabganj, Pumeah dis, Behar, 6. 

Nawabganj, 24-Perguunahs dis, B. 

Nawabganj Aleabad, Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. P, 

Nawabpur, Mooltan dis, P. 

Nawab Shah, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Nawadah, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Nawadih, Moon^hyr dis, Behar, B. 

Nawagam, Rajpipla s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Nawagang, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Nawa^^arh, Bilaspur^tj, C. P. 

Nawai, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Nawai, j odnpore s, R. A. 

Nawakhala Chanda dis, C. P. 

Nawakhali, A. 

Nawakila, Peshawar dis, P. 

Nawakot, Thar and Patkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Nawalgarh, Jeypore s. R, A. 

Nawalgund, /a/, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Nawai pur, Mcwas s. Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Nawanagar, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Nawanagar or Jamnagar, /. Hallar dis, Kattywar, 

Bo. P. 
Nawapur, par, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 
Nawashahr, s,d. Jullundur ^iV, P. 
Naw^^aon, Chanda dis, C. P. 
Nawegaon, h, and Bhandara</«, C. P, 
Nayabad, par, Mymensingh dis, B, 
Nayabasti, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 
Naya-Changani, r. Backergunge dis, B. 
Nayagaon, Rajshahye dis, B. 
Nayagaon, Banda dis, N. W. P, 
Nayagaon, Saiundis, Behar, B. 
Nayagar, par, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Nayagar /. s. Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 
Nayagram, Midnapore dis, B. 
Nayakanhatti, /./. Chitaldroog dir, Mysore, x. M. P. 
Nayal, Gwalior, s. C. I. A. 
Nayapara, Jessore dis, B. 
Nayapara, Nuddea dis, B. 
Nayasarai, Hooghly dis, B. 
Naydongri, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 
Nayudupet, Nellore, dis, M. P. 
Nazareth, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 
Nazira, Sibsagar dis, A. 
Nazirabad, par, Bhopal s. C. I. A, 
Nazirpur, Backergunge dis, B. 
Nedhrad, Ahmedabad dis, Bo. P. 
Neelapalli, Godavari dis, M. P. 
Neemuch, can/, and dis, Gwalior s. C.I. A, 
Negamam, s. Coimbatore dis, M. P. 
Negapatam, /«/, Taniore dis, M. P. 
Negheri Ting, A. and /. Sibsagar dis, A. 
Neguan, Midnapore dis, B. 
Neknamji, /./. Tonk s. R. A. 
Nelamangala, Bangalore dis, Mysore, j. M. P. 
Nellakota, Nilgiri dis, M. P. 
Nellakota, Madura dis^ M. P. 
Nelli, Nowgong dis, A. 
Nellikuppam, South Arcot dis, M. P. 
Nellore, cap, and dis, M. P. 

Nemalpur c. Sankhera Mewas j. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 
Neoriya, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 
Nepal, s. Himalayas. 
Ner, par, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 
Neral, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 
Nerbudda r. C. P. C. I. A. and Bo. P. 



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( Ixxviii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



N. 



Neri, Khandesh dif, Bo. P. 

Nerla, Satara d{s. Bo. P. 

Ner Parsopant, Berar H. A. D. 

Ner Pinglai, Berar H. A. D. 

Neri, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Nerur, Sawant Wan, /. Bo. P. 

Nesargi, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Nesri, Kolhapur /. Bo. P. 

Netai, r. Garo Hills dir^ A. 

Netrani, Eanara dis. Bo. P. 

Netrakona, 5,d, Mymensingh </*j, B. 

Netravati, r. South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Neulbisi, par^ Cuttack rfij, Orissa, B. 

Newaj, r. Rajgarh s, C. I. A. 

Newasa, /«/, Ahmednagar dis^ Bo. P. 

Ngathinegyoung, Bassein dis^ B. B. 

Nhavra, Poona dis^ Bo. P. 

Niamati, Backergunge dis, B, 

Niamatpur, Burdwan dis^ B. 

Niaran, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Nibari, duar^ Garo Hills dis, A. 

Nibhera, BhurtporeJ. R. A. 

Nibhera. Tonk s. R. A. 

Nichlaul, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Nidadavol, z, Godavari dis^ M. P. 

Nidamangalam, Tanjore dis^ M. P. 

Nidgod, Kanara e/ix. Bo. P. 

Nidhauli, Colaba dis. Bo. P. 

Nidhauli, Etah dis, N. W. P. 

Nidtad ho. Yelsavirshime /a/, Coorg, M. P. 

Nighasan, par, Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Nigohan Sissaindi, par, Lucknow dit, N. W. P. 

Nigohi,/tfr, Shahjahanpur /6'j, N. VV. P. 

Nihal Singhwala, Ferorepore dis, P. 

Nikli, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Nilkaling, Dewas s. C. I. A. 

Nihtor, /. and/«r, Bijnor ^iV, N. W. P. 

Nila, Jhelum dis, P. 

Nila, Kohat dis, P. 

Nilakhi, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Nilambur,/r. Malabar fl^iV, M. P. 

Nilganj, 24-Pergiinnahs dis^ B. 

Nilgiri, h, and dis, M. P. 

Nilkanth Mahadeo, sk, Tonk x. R. A. 

Nilla, Chittagong dis, B. 

Niman, Bickaneer s. R, A. 

Nimanpur, par, Dhar s. C. I. A. 

Nimapara, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Nimar, dis, C. P. 

Nimar, div, Indore, x. C. I. A. 

Nimaserai, Maldah dis, B. 

Nimawar/ar, Indore s. C I. A. 

Nimawar Pachmahal div, Indore, s» C. I. A. 

Nimaz, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Nimbait, par, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Nimbaj, Jodhpur s, R. A. 

Nimbgaon, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Nimbagaon Jali, Ahmednagar, dis. Bo. P. 

Nimbgaon Katki, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Nimbhera, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Nimbora, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Nimdant, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Nimgaon, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Nimgiri, h, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Nimiaghat, Hazaribagh rt^/x,Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Nim-ka-thana, Jeypore j. R. A, 



Nimkarori, Farrukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Nimkhera, €, Bheel a, C. I. A. 

Nimkheri, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Nimli /./. Jeypore s. R. A. 

Nindo Shahr, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Ningan, khal, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Ninlau, A. 

Ninor, /. Partabgarh /. R. A. 

Nipani, Kaladgi dis, Bo. P. 

Nipani, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Nipania, Jalaun </i>, N. W. P. 

Niphad, tal, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Nira r. Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Nirah, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Niralgi, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Nirgundi, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Nirmal, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Nirmala, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Nirsha or Nirshachati, Manbhoom dis, Cbota- 

Nagpore, B. 
Nirsoshi, Kaladgi dis, Bo. P. 
Nirviali, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 
Nirwanappangudd, Belgaum dit. Bo. P. 
Nisankhpurkudha, par, Bhagalpur dit, Bebar, B. 
Nisbetganj, Rungpore dis, B. 
Nishanigudda, Kanara dis, B. 
Nishchindeepore, Nuddea dis, Bo. P. 
Nithpur, Dinagepore dis, B. 
Niti, Garhwal dis, N. W. P. 
Niwai, dis, Je3rpore s, R. A. 
Nizamabad, par, Azanagarh dis, N. W. P. 
Nizamat, palace, Moorshedabad dis, B. 
Nizampatam, Kistna dis, M. P. 
Nizampur, EUichpur dis, Berar, H. A. D. 
Nizampur, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 
Nizampur, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 
Nizampur, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 
Nizamtala, 24-Pergunnahs dis, 6. 
Nizamuddin, Delhi dis, P. 

Nizamuddinpur|Bagra,^r, Durbhunga^ftV, Behar, B. 
Noada, Midnapore dis, B. 
Noakhali, Sylhet dit, A. 
Noakholly or Bhullooah, cap, and dis, B. 
Noakholly Khal, khal, NoalchoUy dis, B. 
Noan, Shahabad, dis, Behar, B. 
Noanadi, r. Kamrup dis, A. 
Noarband, cant. A. 

Nobosophoh, s, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 
Nogora, A, 

Nohar, Bickaneer s, R. A. 
Nohata, Rajshahye dis, B. 
Nohatta, Jessore dis, B. 
Noh Jhil, Muttra dis, N. W. P. 
Nokha, Shahabad dit, Behar, B. 
Non, r. Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B, 
Nonai, r. Darrang dis, A. 
Nonaur, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 
Noner, Mainpurif/iJ, N. W. P. 
Nongspung, x. Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 
Nongstoin, s, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dit, A. 
Nongtyrmen, s. Khasi and^ Jaintia Hills dis, A. 
Nongpoh, Khasi and Jjtintia Hills dis, A. 
Nongklao, s, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis, A. 
Nonhara, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 
Norakonarsandikai, A. 
Nosang Naga Hills dis, A. 



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( Ixxix ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



N. 

Nosam, Kumool dis^ M. P. 

Notan, par^ Durbhunga dis^ Behar, B. 

Kowada, s,d, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Kowalsigudda, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Nowgawan, Moradabad </iJ, N. W. P. 

Nowgong, cantf Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Nowgong, capt and dis^ A. 

Nowpara, Jessore dis^ B. 

Nowshera, cant, Peshawar dis, P. 

NoMTtala, Moakholly dis, B. 

Noyil r. Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Nuagan, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Nuapara, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Nuddea, dis, B. 

Nugur, /a/, ChandA dis, C. P. 

Nuh, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Nuhta, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Nunai. r. Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Nunbil. hot-spring, Sonthal Pergunnahs^iV, Behar, B. 

Nundydroog, h, and/./. Kolar dis^ Mysore s, M. P. 



N. 

Nungumbaukum, Madras City, M. P. 

Nunia, r. Burdwan dis, B, 

Nunnadi, r. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Nurabad, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Nannahal,^t>, Jullundur rt'w, P. 

Numagar, fair, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Nurpur, Bijnor dis, N. W. P. 

Nurpur, Kangra dis, P. 

Nurpur, Shahpur ais, P. 

Nurpur, Hoshiarpur dis, P. 

Nurp^ir, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Nurpur, Hoshiarpur dis, P. 

Nurpur, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Nurwah. ca, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Nusseerabad, cant, Ajmere dis, R. A, 

Nutanganj, Burdwan dis, B. 

Nuzvid, z, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Nya Doomka, cant, and s,d, Sonthal Pergunnahs 

dis, Behar, B. 
Nyamati or Namti, Shimoga dis, Mysore x. M. P. 



o. 

Oalia, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Oarigachha, Rungpore dis, B. 

Obra, p.p, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Od, Broach dis, Bo. P. 

Odalguri, A. 

Odayakulam, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Oel, Kheri dis, Oudh, N, W. P. 

Ogan, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Oghad-ni-Thali, Radhanpur s. Bo. P. 

Ohan, n Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Ohipum Tan, h, Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Ojhar, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Oihat, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Okara, fair, Montgomery cUs, P. 

Okhla, Delhi dis, P. 

Okhamandal, dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Okri, par, Gya and Patna dis, Behar B. 

01, Agm dis, N. W. P. 

Olabhar, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Olakur, South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Olas, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Olavakod, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Oldhar, par, Pooree dis, Orissa B. 

Olha, Chumparun dis, Behar B. 

Olpad, tal, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Olpur, Furreedpore </w, B. 

Omalur, Salem dis, M. P. 



Omkar, r. Ahmedabad dis, Bo. P. 

Onda, Bankoora dis, B. 

Ongari, /./. Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Ongole, tai, Nellore dis, M, P. 

Oodeypore, s» R. A. 

Oolaberiah, Hooghly dis, B. 

Oosoor, tat, Salem dis, M. P. 

Ootacamund, san, Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Or, r. Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Ora, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Orai, s.d, Jalaun dis, N. W. P. 

Orai, r. Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Oran, Banda dzs, N. W. P. 

Oran, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Orang, Darrang dis, A. 

Orasingha, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Orchha or Tehri, s. Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Orderly bazar, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Orissa, div, and pr, B. 

Ormanji, par, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore B. 

Orpure-ka-tal, /, Kerowlee s, R. A. 

Osham, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Ottaipidaram, tat, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Ottapalam, r,s. Malabar dis, M. P. 

Otapidaram, Tinnevelly dis, M, P, 

Otur, par, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Owk, Kumool dis, M. P. 



p. 

Paba, r, A. 

Pabal, Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Pabar, Ahmednagar, dis, Bo. P. 

Pabbi, GvLJmtdis, P. 

Pabhat, Umballa dis, P. 

Pabjo, Hyderabad dis, Sind, 60. P. 



p. 

Pabla, deil, Jessore dis, B. 

Pachahi par, Durbhanga dis, Behar, B. 

Pachaimalai, A, Salem dis, M. P. 

Pachamba, c,s, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore B. 

Pachamba, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Pachapur, Belgaum, dis. Bo. P. 



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Google 



( Ixxx ) 

Alphabetical Index. 



P. 

Pachaur, Narsingbgarh /. C. I. A* 

Pachchhim Sarira, Allahabad dit, N. W. P. 

Pachchhimbhigo, /ar, DurbhuDga dis, Behar B. 

Pachewar, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Pachham, Cutch s. Bo. P. 

Pachhapur, par, Belgaum dis^ Bo. P. 

Pachhar, Gwalior, s. C. I. A. 

Pachhauhan, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Pachhikot, Pooree dis^ Orissa, B. 

Pachhimratt, par, Fyzabad <///, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Pachhoha/tfr, Hardoi a'w, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Pachkhura, Hamiq>ur dis, N. W. P. 

Pachlakh, par, Sanin dit, Behar, B. 

Pachmarhi, san and h, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Pachmarhi, z. Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Pachnehi, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Pachor, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Pachor, par, Narsingbgarh s. C. I- A. 

Pachora, /a/, Khandesh dif. Bo, P. 

Pachotar, par, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 

Pachpadra, Jodhpore /. R. A. 

Pachpahar par, Jhalawar s» C. I. A. 

Pachrukhi, par, Gya dis, Behar B. 

Pachun, Bickaneer s, R. A. 

Pachwari, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Pad Eden, Hyderabad dh, Sind, Bo. P. 

Pada, beil, Rajshahye dis, B* 

Padalam, ,rs, Chingleput dis, M. P* 

Padamnathji, p.p. Tonk /. R. A. 

Padampur, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Padarti, salt stn. Nellore dis, M. P. 

Padinalknad, cap and dis, Coorg, M. P. 

padlia, Dewas j. C. I. A. 

padma, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore B. 

padmabila, bcel, Burdwan, dis, B. 

padmabila, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Padmala, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

padmala, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

padra, Baroda, s. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

padri, par, Dnrbhunga dis, Behar B. 

padrishibpur, Backergunge dis, B. 

padshahawari, Ahmedabad dis, Bo. P. 

paena, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

paenda, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

pagar, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

pagar, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore B. . 

pagara, z. Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

pagaro, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

pagla Manas, r. Kamrup dis, A. 

PaglarTek, h, A. 

pahara, h. Gya dis, Behar, B. 

pahara, Mirzapur dit, N. W. P. 

pahara, par, Farrukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Paharapur, par, Gonda dis^ Oudh, N. W. P. 

Paharganj, Delhi dis, P. 

Pahargarh, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Pahari, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Pahari, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Pahari Banka, j\ Bundelkhand C. I. A, 

Paharpur, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Pahar Sirgira, z, Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Pahasu, par, Bulandshahr, dis, N. W. P, 

Pahesar, Bhurtpore s. R. A. 

Pahladpur, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 

Pahra, /. Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Pahra, par^ Gy&dis^ Behar, B, 



Pahrianwali, Gajrat dis, P. 

Pahuj, r, C. I. A. 

Pahuj, r, N. W. P. 

Pahumara, r, Kammp dis, A. 

Paika, r, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Paika, Rungpore dir, B. 

Paikoliya, Basti, dis, N. W. P. 

Paikpara, iAa/, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Paila, par, Khcri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Pailani, /. d. Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Paimar, r. Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Painda, r. Sylhet dis, A. 

Paintepur, Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Paisuni, r. Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Paithun, Hyderal^ad (Nizam's Dominions.) 

Pakala, part, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Pakambar or Suleman, A. Cuttack^ dir, Orisssa, B. 

Pakariawas, cant, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Pakhariapura, Gwalior s, C- I. A« 

Pakhi Mara, A. 

Pakhi Mian, Mooltan dis P. 

Pakha Laran, Shahpur, dis, P. 

Pakni, Sholapur dis. Bo. P. 

Pakoria, Pubna dis, B. 

Pakpattan, /. and fair, Montgomery dis, P. 

Pakri, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Pakribarwan, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Pakhr, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Pal, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Pal, Satara dis, Bo. P. 

Pala, Amraoti dir, Berar, H. A. D. 

pala, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Pala, Colaba dis. Bo. P. 

Pala, Kanara dis, Bo. P. 

Paladam, tat, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Palakod, Salem dis, M. P. 

Palakol, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Palam, Delhi dis, P. 

Palamcottah, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Palamow, s,d. Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Palampur, /. and_/5w>, Kangra, dis, P. 

Palan, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Palang, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Palani, par, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Palanpur, s. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Palar, r. Chingleput dis, M. P. 

Palar or Kshira, r. Mysore s, M. P. 

Palasbari, Kamrup dis, A. 

Palasgaon z. Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Palasgarh «. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Palashari, Kamrup dis, A. 

Palashbari, Rungpore dis, B. 

Palashdanga, Burdwan dis, B. 

Palasi, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Palaskhed, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Palasni, e, Sankhera Mewas s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Palasvihir, Dang s. Khandesh dis, Bo. P, 

Paldeo, / Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Paldhi, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Palej, Broach dis. Bo. P. 

Paler, r. Kistna dis, M. P. 

Palera, /. Banswaraj. R. A. 

Palganjo, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Palghar, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Palghat, tai, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Palhalli, Mysore dis, Mysore j. M. P, 



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Google 



( Ixxxi ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



P. 

Pali, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Pali, Bhor s, Satara dit. Bo. P. 

Pali, Delhi dis, P. 

Pali, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Pali, Kaira dif. Bo. P. 

Pali, Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 

Pali, /or, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Palia, /ar, Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Paliganj, Patna diif Behar, B. 

Palitana, /a/, Gohelwad dU, Katt3rwar, Bo. P. 

Palivela, s. Godavari dis^ M. P. 

Paliyad, Kattywar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Palkhera, s. Bhandara dis^ C. P. 

Palkonda, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Palkot, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore B« 

Palladam, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Pallapatti, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Pallarapalli Mitta, s. Salem dis, M. P. 

Psdlavaram, Chingleput dis, M. P. 

PaUipat, North Axcot dis, M, P. 

Pallor, r,s. North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Palma, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore B. 

Palma, par, Manbhoom dis, Chota*Nagporei B. 

Palmaner, /a/. North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Palnad, tal, Kistiia</t>, M. P. 

Palnahara, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Palni, /. and A. Madara dis, M. P. 

Palod, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Paloha, Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

Palpur, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Palsa, ^//, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Palsi, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Palta, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Palur, Chingleput dis, M. P. 

Palur, s. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Palwal, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Palyad, Kattywar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Pamam, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Pambaiyar, r. South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Pamban, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Pamidi, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Pamlagautam, n Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Pamuru, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Panabalia, Backergunge dis, B. 

Panabaras, «. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Panagar, Burdwan dis, B. 

Panagarh, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Panahat, /. and par, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Panai, ^el, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Panaj, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Panam, r. Panch-Mahals dis. Bo. P. 

Panappakam, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Panar, r. Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Panar, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Panbhai, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Panbihar, /. Wn. Malwa a. C. I. A. 

Panchabibi, Bogra dis, B. 

Panchadhar, A. Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Panchakhand, A. 

Panchakot, A. Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Panchala, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Panchamnagar, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Panchanai, r. Patna and Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Panchanavi, r, Darieeling dis, B. 

Panchapali, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Pancbapota, a4«Peigunnahs dis, B. 



P. 

Panchar, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Pancharatner tek. A* Darjeeling dis, B. 

Panchasar, Radhanpur s, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Panchat, Midnapore dis, B. 

Panchdona, Dsucc&dis, B. 

Panchgan^a, r. Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Panchgam, Satara dts. Bo. P. 

Panchgawhjkn, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Panchi r. Cuddapah dis, M. P. 

Panch Pandu, caves, Bheel a, C. I. A. 

Panchpirwa, Goadadis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Panchpukuria, /air, Tipperah dis, B. 

Panchupur, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Panchthupi, ^eerbhoom dis, B. 

Pandalpur, /air, Saugor dit, C. P. 

Pandana, z, Bilaspur </i/, C. P. 

Pandatarai, Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Pandarwara, Lunawara s, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Pandaul, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Pander koura, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Pandhana, Nimar dis, C. P. 

Pandharpur, Sholapur dts,. Bo. P. 

Pandhoi, r. N. W. P. 

Pandhuma, Chhindwara dis, C. P. 

Pandra, par, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B 

Pandri, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Pandu, €, Pandu Mewas s, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Pandu, r. N. W. P. 

Pandua, Sylhet dis, A. 

Pandur, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Panduya, A. 

Pandwa, Balasinor s, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Pandwa, r, C. I. A. 

Pandwaha, /. trndpar, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Panem, Kumool dis, M. P. 

Panetha, Rajpipla s, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Panga, A. Smghbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Panga, Rungpore dis, B. 

Pangaon, Sholapur dis. Bo. P. 

Pangara, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Pangasi, r. Jessore dis, B. 

Pangryo, Hyderabad <^V, Sind, Bo. P. 

Pangsa, Furreedpore </<>, B. 

Pangshi, Pubna dis, B. 

Pangua, Bet/, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Panguchhi r. Jessore dis, B. 

Pannala, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Panhala (old,) Miraj s. Bo. P. 

Panhan, par, Unao dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Panhwan, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Paniala, par, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Pani Bijwar, /ar, Indore s, C. I, A. 

Panighata, Nuddea dis, B. 

Panihati, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Panikhanda, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Panimar, Nowgon^ dis, A. 

Panipat, Kamal dis, P. 

Panitolla, Lakhimpur dis, A. 

Paniyara, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Panjan, Gujrat dis, P. 

Panjhan, r. Nasik dis. Bo, P. 

Panjhra, r, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Panjia, Jessore dis, B. 

Panjkola, Mooltan dis, P. 

Pamna, r, Kerowlee dis, R. A. 

Panki, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 



K 

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( Ixxxii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



P. 



Panna, s, Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Pannuganj, Mirzapui itis, N. W. P. 

Pano Akil, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Panohar, Ludhiana </fV, P. 

Panoli, Broach dis, Bo. P. 

Panrud, South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Pansina, Jhalawad dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Panskura, Midnapore dis, B. 

Pantamba, Ahmednagar kis, Bo. P. 

Pantan,/.r. Kamrup dis, A. 

Pantanaw, Thonkwa dis, B. B. 

Panthawara, Palanpur s, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Panth Piplauda, e. Western Malwa a. C. I. A. 

Panvad, Chota Udepur s. Bo. P. 

Panwar, r, Gya dif, Behar, B. 

Panwari, /. and s,d. Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Panwel, /al, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Paoda, deel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Paota, Jeypore /. R. A. 

Papaghnl, r. Cuddapah dis, M. P. 

Papaghni, r. Mysore s. M. P. 

Papal, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Papanasam, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Paprainda, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Par, r. Surat dis, Bo. P. 

Para, par, Bheel a. C. I. A. 

Para, par, Manbhoom dis, Cbota-Nagpore, B, 

Parali, Satara dts, Bo. P. 

Paramakudi, Madura dis, M. P. 

Paramatti, Salem dis, M. P. 

Paramnagar, Farukhabad dis, N. W. P, 

Parang, r. Midnapore dif, B. 

Paranginid, t.c. Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Parantij, ta/, Ahmedabad dit. Bo. P. 

Paras, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Parasan, Jalaun dis, N. W. P. 

Parasgad, tal, Belgaum dis, Bo. P. 

Parasgaon, z. Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Parasnath, Aundh s, Satara dis^ Bo. P. 

Parasnath, see Pareshnath. 

Parashram, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Parasuram* A. 

Paraswad, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Paraswara, Balaghat dis, C. P. 

Parauna, s,d, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Paravanar, r. South Arcot dis, M. P. 

Parawar, Jalaun dis, N, W, P. 

Parbati, r. C. I. A. 

Parbati, r. Dholpur j. R. A* 

Parbati, r, N. W. P. 

Parbatipur, Dinagepore dis, B, 

Parbatpara, par, Monghyr dis, B^hftTi B. 

Parbatsar, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Parchol, par, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Parda, par, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Pardhari, Hallar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Pardi, /a/, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Pareshnath A, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagporip, B. 

Pargad, Kaladgi dis, Bo. P. 

Pargaon, Poona dis. Bo, P. 

Parhar, Muzaf&rgarh dis, P. 

Pariar, /ar, \Jn^(y dis, Oudh, N. W. P, 

Parichhatgarh, Meenit dis, N, W. P. 

Pariharpur Jabdi/ar, Durbhunga <^j, Befaar, B. 

Pariharpur Ragho, par, Durbhunga dis, Bphar Pr 

^arikud, par, ?f)ott^t^s, Oiissa, B. 



p. 



Pari Nangar,/.A.t, Thar and Parkar^tx, Sind, Bo. P. 

Parincha, Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Parkar, U. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Parkul, A. 

Parla Kimedi, «. Godavari dis, M. P. 

Parlakot, r. Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Parlakot, Bastar s. C. P. 

Parli, r,s .Malabar dit, M. P. 

Parli, Hyderabad (Nizam's Dominions) 

Parmanand, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Pamala, Rohtak dis, P. 

Pamasala, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Pamer, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Parnera, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Parola, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 

Paron, /. Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Parpanangadi, r.s. Malabar dis, M. P. 

Parpori, i. Raipur dis, C. P. 

Parsa, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Parseoni, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Parshadepur, par, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Parsharam, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Parshik, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Parsibazar, 24-Pergimnahs dis, B. 

Partabgani, Bhagalpur dis, Bdiar, 6. 

Partabganu/ar, Bara Banki dir, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Partal^arh, cap, and dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Partat^rh, cap, and s, R. A. 

Partapor, Banswara s, R. A. 

Partur, Hyderabad, (Nizam's Domini(nu) 

Paru, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Paruspur, Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Parvatipur, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Parwa, Basim dis, Berar H. A. D. 

Parwad, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Parwain, Hoshiarpur dis, P. 

Parwan, r. Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Parwan, r. Tonk s. R. A. 

Parwat, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Parwat, Sawant Wari s. Bo. P. 

Parwati, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Parwati, Foona. dis. Bo. P. 

Parwaya, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Parwezabad, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Pasai, par, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Bdiar, B. 

Paschimdih, Dacca dis, B. 

Paschimduai, par, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Pasgawan, par, Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Pasnan, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Poshar, r. Jessore dis. B. 

Pasrur, Sialkot dis, P. 

Pasur, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Pat Tala, Sawantwari s. Bo. P. 

PatadtkaJ, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Patakottacheru r.s. Bellaiy dis, M. P. 

Patalam, Chingleput dis, M» P. 

Pataman, Goalpara dis, A. 

Patambi, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Patamundai, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Patan, Baroda s. Bo. P. 

Patan, Jeypore j. R. A, 

Patan, Jubbulpore dis, C. P, 

Patan, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Patan, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Patan, par, Narsinghgarh s. C. I. A. 

Pata»,/tfr, Uu&odis, Oudh, N. W. P 



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( Ixxxiii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



Patan, Sorath dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Patan, /a/, Satara^ix, Bo. P. 

Patansaongi, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Patas, Poonai/w, Bo. P. 

Pataspur, par^ Midnapore dis, B. 

Pata Tekkali, z, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

PaUudi, s, P. 

Pataura, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Patazai, Pubna dis, B. 

Patepur, Mozufterpore </w, Behar, B. 

Pateshwar, Satara dis, Bo. P. 

Patera, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Patgaon, Kolhapurx. Bo. P. 

Patgram, pat, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Pathankot, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Pathar, Rajpipla s, Rewa Kanta, Bo, P. 

Pathardi, Ahmednagar dis, Bo. P. 

Palhari, /. Dewasx. C. I. A. 

Pathari, s. Bhopal j. C. I. A. 

Patharia, 7. Indore s. C. I. A. i 

Patharia, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Pathariya, A. Sylhet dis, A. 

Pathar Kachhar,/ Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Pathena, Bhurtpore J. R. A. 

Patbgram, c,s, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Pathraudha, Baghelkhand C. I. A. 

Pathri, r. Gondz dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Pathriparbani, Hyderabad (Nizam*s Dominions) 

Pathrol, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Pathrot, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Pathur, Akola dis, Berar H. A. D. 

Pathuria, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Pati, Barwani s. C. I. A. 

Patia, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Patiala, s. P. 

Patiali, Etah dis. N. W. P. 

Patihal, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Patikona, dee/, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Patiladaha, Rungpore dis, B. 

Patiram, par, Dinagepore dis, B. 

Pativa, Chittagong dzs, B. 

Patjirwa, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Patkai. m.r, A. 

Patkebari, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Patkolanda, «. Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Patkum, par, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Patli, Tonk s, R. A. 

Patna, cap, and dis, Behar, B. 

Patna, cap, and s. Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Patna, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

Patna, r. Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Patna, r, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Patnitala, Dinagepore dis, B. 

Patoaman, Goalpara dis, A. 

Patoda, par, Nasik dis, Bo. P. 

Patonda, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 

Patooakhally, s,d, Backergunge dis, B. 

Patrahat, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Patrasaer, Bankoora</w, B. 

Patrasaer, Burdwan dit, B, 

Patri, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Patro, r. Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Patta, Ahmednagai dts. Bo. P. 

Pattahat, NoakhoUy dis, B. 

Pattan, Betul dis, C. P, 

Pattambi, Malabar dis, M, P. 



Pattesam, «. Godavari dis, M. P. 

Patti, /air, Lahore dis, P. 

Patti, s,d, Partabgarh dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Pattikonda, /a/, Kumool dis, M. P. 

Patukota, /a/, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Patuli, Burdwan dis, B. 

Patur, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Paturda, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Patur Nandapur, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Patur Shekh Babu, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Patwi, Umbalia dis, P. 

Paud, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Paumben, Madura dis, M. P. 

Pauna, r. Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Pauna, r, Wardha dis, C. P. 

Paundi, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Pauni, Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Pauri, Garhwal dis, N W. P. 

Pauthi, Palanpur s. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Pavagada, A. Chitaldroog dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Pav^war, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Pavitragad, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

pawa, Lndhiana dis, P. 

Pawagarh, A, Panch Mahals dis. Bo. P. 

Pawai, A. Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Pawai, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Pawai, /ar, Bhagalpur </t>, Behar, B. 

Pawaiya, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Pawangarh, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Pawanr, far, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Pawapun, p.p. Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Pawar, Cutcn s. Bo. P. 

Pawar, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Pawas, Ratnagiri dis, Bo. P. 

Pawayan, Shjihjahanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Pawi Mutanda, i. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Payer, par, Sonthal Pergunnahs </ij, Behar, B, 

Payoli, Malabar dis, M. P. 

Payoshni or Purna, r. Berar, H. A. D. 

Payrabanda, Rungpore dis, B. 

Paysia, Gorakhpur </w, N. W. P. 

Peapully, Kumool dis, M. P, 

Pedda Kimedi, «. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Peddapad, r.s. Cuddapah dis, M. P. 

Peddapuram, tai, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Pedgaon, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Peermaad, Travancore /. M. P. 

Pegu, cap, and div, B. B. 

Peint, s. Bo. P. 

Peiwar, Afghanistan. 

Pen, fa/, Colaba dis. Bo. P. 

Penakonda, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Pench, r, Chhindwara dis, C. P. 

Pendra, z. Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Pendur, Ratnagiri dis, Bo. P. 

Penganga, r. Berar, H. A. D. 

Pennagaram, Salem dis, M. P. 

Pennar, South Arcot dit, M. P. 

Pennar, or Pinakini, r. Mysore s. M P, 

Penner, r. Nellore dis, M. P. 

Pentakota, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Pentapadu, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Penukonda, /a/, Bellary dit, M. P. 

Peraiyur, «. Madura <//>, M. P. 

Perambalur, /to/, Trichinopoly dis, M. P. 

Perambur, Chingleput dis, M. P. 



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( Ixxxiv ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



P. 

Peri, Rimgpore dis, B. 

Perim, Ahmedabad dis^ Bo. P. 

Perim, I. Bo. P. 

Periyakulam, tal, Madura dis^ M. P. 

Periyapatna, Mysore s, M. P. 

Periyar. r. Madura dit^ M. P. 

Periyur, h. Madura dis^ M. P. 

Perpengadi, Malabar dis^ M. P. 

Perozepore, s.d, Backergunge //</, B. 

Perpangadi, Malabar dis^ M. P. 

Peruana, Jhang dis^ P. 

Perundurai, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Pcrur, tem^ G^imbatore dis^ M. P. 

Perzagarh, z, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Pesam, Hazaribagh dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Peshawar, cap, cofU, and dis, P. 

Petai, Tinnevell^ dis, M. P. 

Petarbar, Hazanbagh ditf Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Peth, Poona dU, Bo. P. 

Peth,Satara</iV, Bo. P. 

Pethapur, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Petlad, Baroda s, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Phagi, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Phagwara, TuUundur </i>, P. 

Phagwara, Kapurthala /. P. 

Phalakata, c,s, and s.d, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Phalegaon, Basim dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Phagu, r. Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Phalera, Jeypore j. R. A. 

Phalia, Gujrat dis, P. 

Phaliur, tem^ Sylhet dis^ A. 

Phalki, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat Bo. P. 

Phalodi, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Phalsund, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Phalta, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Phaltan, s, Satara dit^ Bo. P. 

Phanaideva, Darjeellng dis, B. 

Phaphamau, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Phaphund, s,d, EUwah dis, N. W. P. 

Pharah. Mainpuri dis^ N. W. P. 

Pharal bazar, iChasi and j[aintia Hills </i>, A. 

Pharamgiri, Garo Hills dis, A. 

Pharingachhi, r. Burdwan dit, B. 

Pharkhara, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Pharkia, /ar, Mon£hyr</(>, Behar, B. 

Pharoya Tan, h, Chittagong Hill TracU dis, B. 

Phega, trihUaty, Chittagong HiU Tracts dis^ B. 

Phen, r. Mandla dis, C. P. 

Phillora, Sialkot dir, P. 

PhiUour, cani, Jullundur dit, P. 

Phingeswar, f. Kaipur dis, C. P. 

Phonda, Ratnagiri ais. Bo. P. 

Phonda, A, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Phonda, /. Kolhapur s. Bo: P. 

Phoranbari, Rungpore dis^ B. 

Phukalian, Sialkot dis, P. 

Phulan, Mttzafibuqgarh tiu, P. 

Pholangraumari, A. 

Phttlbaxi, par, Dinagepore dis, B. 

Phttlbari, par, Maldah dis, B. 

Pholbari, Patoa, du, Behar, B, 

Phulhata, Balasore dis, Ocissa, B. 

Phttlhatta, r. Jestore dis, B, 

Phttljhar, i. Sambalpar dis, C. P. 

Phuliurif k. SoQthal Pcrgunoahs dis, Bdiar, B. 

Phttlkumar, Rungpore dis^ B. 



P. 

Phulkusama,/ar, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpoxe, B. 

Phulperas, Ehirbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Phulpur, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Phulpuf, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Phulpur, Benares, dii, N. W. P. 

Phultala, Jessore dis, B. 

Phulwari, par, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Phutaniganj, A. 

Piagpur, Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Piali, r. 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Piarana, Ferozepore dis, P. 

Piaro, par, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Pichbabani, ca, Midnapore dis, B. 

Pichhola, /, Oodeypore /. R. A. 

Pichhor, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Pihani, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Pihani Pindarwa, /ar, Hardoi <i^, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Pihewa,y&«>, and/./. Umballa </«>, P. 

Piklon, par, Bhopal s. C. I. A. 

Pilauda, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Piler, Cuddapah dis, M. P. 

Pili, r. Partabgarh dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Pilia-khal, /. Western Malwa a. C. I. A. 

Pilibhit, cap, and dis, N. W. P. 

Pilich, par, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Piljanga, Jessore dis, B. 

Pilkana, Farukhabad dis, N. W, P. 

Pilkhuwa, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Pillur 1. Salem dis, M. P. 

Pilu, Thar and Parkar dis, Smd, Bo. P, 

Pimpalgaon Baswant. Nasik dis, Bo. P. 

Pimpalgaon, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Pimpalgaon Kala, Akola, dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Pirfpalgaon Raja, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Pimpalner, /a/, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Pimpalwandi, Poona ^f>. Bo. P. 

Pimpladevi, Dang x. Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Pimpri, Dang s, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 

Pinakini or Pennar, r. Mysore s, M. P. 

Pincha, r. Cuddapah dis, M. P. 

Pindar, r. Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Pindar, r, N. W. P. 

Pindaran, Banda <tfx, N. W. P. 

Pindaruch, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Pind Dadan Khan, Jhelum dis, P. 

Pindi Bhatian, Gujranwala dis, P. 

Pindigheb, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Pind Matte Khan, Jhdum dis, P. 

Pindrye, Mandla dis, C. P. 

Pind Sultani, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Pingal, r. Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Pingi, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Pingla, Midnapore ^«x, B. 

Pingna, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Pinjal, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Pinjar, Akola dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Pipar, Jodhpore s. R. A. 

Piparia, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Piparpur, Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Piparwani, Seom dis, C. P. 

Piplan, Bannu dis, P. 

Piplanda, e. Western Malwa a. C. I. A« 

Piplaun, Western Malwa a. C. I. A. 

Piplee, Pooretdis, Orissa, B. 

PipU, UmballaiAi, P. 

PiapU Bi'oU, Bhopal/. C. I. A. 



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( Ixxxv ) 

Alphabetical Index, 



l^iplia, f. Western Malwa a, C. I. A, 

riplia, /flr, Bheel a. C. I. A. 

riplod, /. Baria s, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Viplod, Nimar <//V, C. P. 

l*ipra, Chumparun ifis, Behar, B. 

Pipraich, Gorakhpur {/is, N. \V. P. 

Piprahri, Banda t/u, N. W. P. 

Pipraund, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Piprenda, Banda *tif, N. W. P. 

Pir Adi\f /air and/./. Dera Ghazi Khan </«, P. 

Pirai, r. Sitapur (f is, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Pirana, Ahmedabad dtf/, Bo. P. 

Pirawa, par, Tonk s. C. I. A. 

Pir Awes, Karachi (fis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Pirbahor, Patna (/is, Behar, B. 

Pirgachha, Rungpore dis, B. 

Pir Gaji, Karachi Ms, Sind, Bo. P. 

Pirganj, par, Dinagepore t/is, B. 

Pirganj, Rungpore r//>, B. 

Pir-jo-Goth, Hyderabad f/ii, Sind, Bo. P. 

Pirmahal, Mooltan i/is, P. 

Pimagar, par, Sitapur t/is, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Pirpainti, Bhagalpur t/is, Behar, B. 

Pir Panjal, Ji. Cashmere s, P. 

Pir Patho, Karachi t/is, Sind, Bo. P. 

Pir Pithora, /./. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Pirthala, Gurgaon t/is, P. 

Piru, Shahabad i/is, Behar, B. 

Pisangan, Ajmere fiis, R. A. 

Pisarva, Poona t/is. Bo. P. 

Pisol, par, Nasik t/is, Bo. P. 

Pisora, Ahmednagar i/is, Bo. P. 

Pithapuram. 2. Godavari dis, M. P. 

Pitlawad, par, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Pithoragarh, can/, Kumaun, tfis, N. \V. P. 

Pithoria, e. Saugor tfis, C. P. 

Pitihra, «. Saugor dis, C. V» 

Piyain, r. A. 

Pizgaon, Wun t/is, Berar, H. A. D. 

Plach, Kullu s. t/. Kangra i/is, P. 

Plassey, d,/. Nuddea t/ts, B. 

Pobi, Hazaribagh t/is, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Podanur, Coimbatore, t/is, M. P. 

Podih', Nellore t/is, M. P. 

Pohna, Wardha t/is, C. P. 

Pohod, Wun t/is, Berar, H. A. D. 

Poicha. e. Pandu Mewas s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Pokaran, Jodhpore s. R. A. 

Pokhan, r. Karachi t/is, Sind, Bo. P. 

Pokhar or Pushkar, Ajmere t/is, R. A. 

Pol, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

PoUachi, /ai, Coimbatore t/is, M. P. 

Polur, /ai. North Arcot t/is, U» P. 

Polur, Nellore t/is, M. P. 

Pomalwari, Sholapui t/is, Bo. P. 

Pomara, Chittagong t/is, B. 

Ponatit, Khasi and Taintia Hill t/is, A. 

Ponani, /ai, and r. Malabar t/is, M. P, 

Pondicherry, French Settlement M, P. 

Ponnai, North Arcot t/is, M. P. 

Ponnapet, Ki^atnad /a/, Coorg, M. P. 

Ponneri, to/, Cninglegut t/it, ^^. P. 

Ponniar, r. South Arcot t/is, M. P. 

Ponniar, r. Salem t/is, M. P. 

Ponur, Kistna t/is, M. P. 

Poena, can/, cap, and, t/it, 60. P. 



Poonamallee, Chingleput t/is, M. P. 

Poonpoon, r. Gya and Patna t/is, Behar, B. 

Pooree, ctip and t/is, Orissa, B. 

Popawatigarh, /./. Bheel a. C. I. A. 

Poradaha, Nuddea t/is, B. 

Poragacha, Furreedpore t/is, B. 

Porahat, par, Singhbhoom t/is, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Pora Parbat, /i. A. 

Poravipalaiyam, Coimbatore t/is, M. P. 

Porbanda, /a/, Barda t/is, Katty war, Bo. P. 

Pori, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Port Blair, Andamans, Bay of Bengal. 

Port Canning, see Canning Town 

Porto Novo, South Arcot t/is, M. P. 

Porumamilla, Cuddapah t/is, M. P. 

Posina, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Polanam, s. Salem t/is, M. P. 

Potanur, Coimbatore t/is, M. P. 

Potavaram, Godavari t/is, M. P. 

Potegaon, z. Chanda t/is, C. P. 

Potikall, /i. Bastar s. C. P. 

Potlan, Oodeypore s. R, A, 

Potna, Burdwanrt^ix, B. 

Potpuri, r. Chanda t/is, C. P. 

Pottanum, z, Salem tiii, M. P. 

Poungday, Prome f/is, B. B. 

Poyakhaly, par, Pumeah i/is, Behar B. 

Poynad, Colaba t/is. Bo. P. 

Prabal, Tanna t/is. Bo. P. 

Prabhanwalli, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Prachi r. Pooree t/is, Orissa, B. 

Prachi, Sorath t/is, Katt3rwar, Bo. P. 

Pragpura, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Praharpur Mawas, par, Durbhunga t/is, Behar, B. 

Prakasha, Khandesh t/is, Bo. P. 

Pranhita, r. Upper Godavari t/is, C. P. 

Prasidhgarh, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Fratabganj, A. 

Pratabganj, Bhagalpur </m, Behar, B. 

Pratabnagar, 24-i*ergrunnsdis t/is, B. 

Pratap, Pooree t/is, Orissa, B. 

Pratapbaju, par, Rajshahye t/is, B. 

Pratapgarh, Satara t/is. Bo. P. 

Pratapgarh, s. Chhindwara t/is, C. P. 

Prattipedu, Godavari t/is, M. P. 

Praudayar, r. Tanjore t/is, M. 1*. 

Pravidayanar, r. Tanjore rfix, M. P. 

Prawara, r. Ahmednagar i/is. Bo. P. 

Prawara Sangam, Ahmednagar t/is, Bo. P. 

Prayag, Kolhapur x. Bo. P. 

Prempur, Mahi Kanta, Bo. P. 

Pretshila, /<. Gya^/x, Behar, B. 

Proddutur, /a/, Cuddapah t/is, M. P. 

Prome, cap, and t/it, 6. B. 

Protabganj, Goalpara t/is, A. 

Pubna, cap, and t/is, B. 

Pubpar, A. 

Pudda, r. Moorshedabad and Nuddea t/is, B. 

Pudi, North Arcot t/is, M P. 

Pudimadaka, Vizagapatam (/is, M. P. 

Pudukota, X. Trichinopoly t/is, M. P. 

Pudur, t/, Tinnevelly t/is, M. P. 

Puduvayil, Chingleput t/is, M. P. 

Pugalur, Coimbatore //w, M. P. 

Pukhrayan, Cawnpore t/is, N. W. P. 

Pukuria, /ar, Mymensingh //I'x, B. 



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Google 



( Ixxxvi ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



P. 



Pula, Ratnagiri disy Bo. P. 

Pulavanar, r .South Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Pul Badohahi, Kamal dis^ P. 

Pulbudhia, Delhi dis, P. 

PuI|;aon r. /. Wardha dis^ C . P. 

Pulicat, Chingleput dis, M. P. 

Pulicherla, «. North Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Palikonda, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Pulivendla, /a/, Cuddapah </ij, M. P. 

Pullampet, to/, Cuddapah dis^ M. P. 

PuUanger r. Cuddapah ^i>, M . P. 

Pulney, h, and ial, Madura ais, M. P. 

Pulwa, /. d, Mirzapur dis^ N . W. P. 

Punadra, Mahi Kanta, Bo. P. 

Punahana, Gurgaon diSy P. 

Punand, r. Nasik dis^ Bo. P. 

Punarbhaba, r. Maldah and Dinagepore, dis^ B. 

Punasa, f.r, Nimar dis^ C. P. 

Punch, Jhansir/iJ", N. W. P. 

Punch, Kashmir s. P. 

Punch, r. Kashmir x. P. 

Pundi, Ganjam disy M. P. 

Pundil, Gya </ix, Behar, B. 

Pundooah, Hooghly dis^ B. 

Pundri, Kama] diSy P. 

Pungal, Bickaneer x. R. A. 

Punganur, z. North Arcot aYx, M. P. 

Punjab, /r. and Lt. -Governorship, P. 

Punkabaree, Daijeelii^ diSy B. 

Punniar, b,f, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Punra, 24-Pergunnahs dis^ B. 

Puntamba, Ahmednagar diSy Bo. P. 

Pupri, Mozufierpore disy Behar, B. 

Pur, Oodeypore x. R. A. 

Pur, pary Muzaffamagar dis, N. W. P. 

Pura, Fyrabad diSy Oudh, N. Vf, P. 

Purabbhigo, /ar, Durbhunga disy Behar, B. 

Purah, 24-Pergunnahs disy B. 

Puramamilla, Cuddapah diSy M. P. 

Puran, Hyderbad ?/ix, Sind, Bo. P. 



p. 

Purandarpur, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Purandhar, /a/, Poona disy Bo. P. 

Purancarh Muchkundi, r. Ratnagiri diSy Bo, P^ 

Purani, Pumeah disy Behar, B. 

Puranigudam, Nowgong diSy A. 

Puranpur, pary Bareilly diSy N. W. P. 

Purara, z. Bhandara diSy C. P. 

Purbadhala. Mymensingh diSy B. 

Purbaduai, pary Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Purbasthali, Burdwan disy B. 

Pureni, Bhagalpur diSy Behar, B. 

Purjana, Pubna diSy B. 

Purkazi, Muzaffamagar disy N. W. P. 

Purkhali, Umballa dis, P. 

Puma, r. Berar, H. A. D. 

Puma, r. Khandesh disy Bo. P. 

Pumeah, capy and dis, Behar, B. 

Pumia, /. Bheel a. C. I. A. 

Pursewaukum, Madras city, M. P. 

Purulia cap. Manbhoom diSy Chota-Nagpore B. 

Purushothapur, Ganiam diSy M. P. 

Purwa, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Purwa, Mandla diSy C. P. 

Purwa, s.d, Unao disy Oudh, N. W. P. 

Pus, r. Berar, H. A. D. 

Pusa, Durbhunga disy Behar, B. 

Pusad, Basim disy Berar, H. A. D. 

Pusda, Amraoti diSy Berar H. A. D. 

Pusesauli, Satara diSy Bo. P. 

Pusla, Amraoti diSy Berar, H. A. D. 

Pushkar or Pohkar, Ajmere diSy R. A. 

Pushp Sagar, /. Tonk x. R. A. 

Pushpagri, h, Coorg, M. P. 

Pushpawati, r. Poona disy Bo. P. 

Putalapattu, North Arcot diSy M. P. 

Puthia, Rajshahye diSy B. 

Puthimari, Goalpara diSy A. 

Putina, Balasore disy Orissa, B. 

Putur, z, Salem diSy M. P. 

Pyapali, Kumool diSy M. P. 



Quetta, Baluchistan 
Quilandi, Malabar diSy M. P. 



Quilon, Travancore x. M. P. 



R. 

Rabbinal, Kaladgi dify Bo. P. 

Rabnabad, i. and r. Sundarbans, B. 

Rabkavi, Sangli x. Bo. P. 

Rabkob, mifusy Singhbhoom disy Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Rabkob, copy Udaipur x. Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Rabri, /. Thar and Parkar dity Sind, Bo. P. 

Rabupura, Bulandshahr disy N. W. P. 

Rachna Doab, t,c, P. 

Radapuram, Tinnevelly disy M. P. 

Radaur, Umballa dity P. 

Radhan, Shikarpur r/ix, Sind, Bo. P. 



R. 

Radhanagar, Bankoora diSy B. 
Radhanpur, x. Gujarat, Bo. P. 
Radhapuram, Tinnevelly disy M. P. 
Radodra, Mahi Kanta, Bo. P. 
Radtondi, Colaba diSy Bo. P. 
Rae Bareli, capy and diSy Oudh, N. W. ?• 
Raekot,/wV, Ludhiana </fx, P. 
Raepur, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 
Raepur, Jodhpore x. R. A. 
Raepur, /. Partabgarh x. R. A. 
Raepur, Oodeypore x. R. A. 



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Google 



( Ixxxvii ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



R. 

Raepur, par^ Indore s, C 1, A. 

Kaepur, Umballa dis^ P. 

Raepuria, Bheel a. C. I. A. 

Raesar, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Raesen, Bhopal s, C. I. A. 

Raewind, Lahore dis^ P. 

Raiiganj,/zfV, Gya^tV, Behar, B. 

Ragarh, Bhor s, Satara dis^ Bo. P. 

Raghanadhapur, Ganjam dis^ M. P. 

Raghapur, Mozufterpore du^ Behar, B. 

Raghogarh,/?. Dewas s, C. I. A. 

Raghogarh, y/. and s, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Raghubati, Burdwan dis^ B. 

Raghunathapuram, s. Ganiam dis, M. P. 

Rughunandan, h, Sylhet ais, A. 

Raghunathganj, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

Ragunathgarh, //. Jeypore j. R. A. 

Raghunathpur, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Raghunathpur, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Raghunathpur, /./. Midnapore dis, B. 

Raghunathpur, Sarun dis, Behar B. 

Raghunathpur, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Ragunathpur, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Raha, Nowgong dis, A. 

Rahama, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Rahan, par, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Rahata, Ahmednagar dit. Bo. P. 

Rahatgarh, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Rahe, Lohardugga dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Rahimabad, Lucknow dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Rahimatpur, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Rahimki Bazar, /./. Thar and Parkaratfj, Sind, Bo. P. 

Rahmatpur, Backergunge dis, B. 

Rahon, JuIIundur dis, P. 

Rahra, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 

Rahuri, tal, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Rai, Tanna dis, Bo. P. 

Rai, Delhi dis, P. 

Raibag, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Raichoor, Hyderabad, Nizams* Dominions. 

Raidroog, tal, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Raiga, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Raiganj, Dinagepore dis, B. 

Raiganj, Pubna dis, B. 

Raigaon, Bhagelkha^d, C. I. A. 

Raigarh Bargarh, s, Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Raikot, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Raikwar, Bhagelkhand, C. I. A. 

Raina, Burdwan dis, B. 

Rainkhan, tributary, Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Raipur, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Raipur, cap, and dis^ C. P. 

Raipur, par, Manbhoom dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Raipur, Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Raipur, Sultanpur dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Raipur, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Raipurkhal, khal, NoakhoUy dis, B. 

Rairakhol, z, Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Rairi, ft, Ratnagiri dts. Bo. P. 

Raishwar, ca, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo, P. 

Rajabahar, A. 

Rajabari, Dacca dis, B. 

Rajaborari, /.r. Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Rajahmundry, /. and tal, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Rajakhal, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Rajakhera, /. Dholpur s, R, A. 



R. 

Rajakhera, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Rajaldesar, Bickaneer s, R. A. 

Rajam, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Rajampet, Cuddapah, dis, M. P. 

Rajana, Montgomery dis, P. 

Rajanagaram, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Rajangaon. o,d, Ahmednagar dis, Bo. P. 

Rajanpur, cant, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Rajapur, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Rajapur, Banda dis, N. W, P. 

Rajapur, Backergunge dis, B, 

Rajapur, Rajshaye dis, B. 

Rajapur, Partal^arh dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Rajapur, tal, Ratnagiri dis, Bo. P. 

Rajapuram, Salem dis, M. P. 

Rnjammpur, par, Dinagepore dis, B. 

Rajarhat, Jesaore dh^ B. 

Rajarhai^ ^-IVrgunnahs rtfj, B. 

Raja&insi, Amritsar i/»J, P. 

Raj asin gam an gal am, Madura dis, M. P. 

Rajauli/Gya/i'Vj, Behar, B, 

Raj^iund, Karrial dis^ P. 

Rajaur, /ijr, Indore s., C. I. A. 

Kajbiirii Furrt-edpore dis, B. 

Raj bad, Pdnl s. Bo. P. 

Rajgan, Sonthal Ftrrgannahs dis, Behar, B. 

Rajganjt p^r^ Dinagepore dis, B. 

Rajganj, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

RaJijaon, liasim dis^ Berar. H. A. D. 

Rajgarh, Ajmere dis, R, A. 

RajgafbT Baria r. Kewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Rajgarh^ Bickaneer j. R. A. 

Uajgarh, r, Bheel a. C. I. A. 

Rajgarh, Gwalior §, C. I. A. 

Rajgarb, Jeypore s. K. A. 

Rajgarh, j. Bhopal a. C. I. A. 

RajfTjirh^ Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Rajgorh, Ulwur f, R. A. 

Rnjgarhi par^ C hand a dis, C. P. 

Rajghat^ Cuttiick i//j, Orissa, B. 

Rajghat, /^rrj', Allahabad //w, N. W. P. 

Rajghat, Kenares dis, N. W. P. 

Kaighat, /tvry, MooUan </m, P. 

Rajghat, ;^,/. HulandiJhahr</iJ, N. W. P» 

Rajgkata, Chan da dis, C. P. 

Rajgir^/d^', Patna, dis, Behar, B. 

RajgiFj p.p. Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Rajgir, Rajpjpla s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Rajgram, fiankoora dis, B. 

Riijhat, Hooghly di$, B. 

Rajhati, Handai, HoiighV dis, B. 

Rajibpur; 24-Pergnnriahs </w, B. 

Rajim, /./. Raipuf^ dis, C. P. 

Rajini, z. Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Kaj Kandi, h, A. 

Rajkut, cap, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Rajniachi^ Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Rajmahalr Jeypore r. R. A. 

Rajmai» Sibsagar ^("r^ A. 

Rajiiiehal, k. and x. d. Sonthal Peigunnahs dis,* 

Behar, B. 
Rajnagar, Sylhet ^iV, A. 
Rajnagar, Beerbhoom dis, B. 
Rajnagar, Furreedpore dis, B. 
Rajnagar, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Ragnagar, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 



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Google 



( Ixxxviii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



R. 

Rajnagar, Oodeypore s. R. A. 

Rajo Khanani, Hyderabad r/if, Sind, Bo P. 

Rajoli, z. Bhandara </w, C. P. 

Rajor, Furreedpore disy B. 

Rajpar, e, Pandu Mewas s, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Rajpipla, j. Rewa Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Rajpur, Barwani s. C. I. A. 

Rajpur/Burdwan //i>, B. 

Rajpur, 2. Sambalpur dis^ C. P. 

Rajpur, Dehra Dun dis, N. W. P. 

Rajpura, Bickaneer s. R. A. 

Rajpura, Patiala s. P. 

Rajpura, /ar, Budaun dis^ N. W. P, 

Rajpura, Umballa rf/>, P. 

Rajpur AH, s. Bheel a, C. I. A. 

Rajpur Soharia, Chumparun <// r, Behar, B. 

Rajrajeshwar, p.p. Banswara s, R. A. 

Rajsamand, /. Oo<leypore s, R. A. 

Rajshahye, </«>, and divt B. 

Rajula, Gohelwad dis^ Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Rajuli, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Rajur, Ahmed nagar dis^ Bo. P. 

Rajur, Poona </i>. Bo- P. 

Rajura, Amraoti dis^ Berar, H. A. D. 

Rajuri, Ahmednagar dis, Bo. P. 

Rajuri, Poona </iV, Bo. P. 

Rajwah, ^a, Shikarpur dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Raj Masna, Chota Udepur s, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Rakab, par^ Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Raksal, Chumparun disy Behar, B, 

Rakshasagudda, Kanarar/iV, Bo. P. 

Rakshi, plaitty Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Raktadana, beel^ Bogra dis^ B. 

Rakti, r. A. 

Ralaota, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Ral^aon, Wun dis^ Berar, H. A. D. 

Ramabudrapur, Vizagapatam dis^ M. P. 

Ramachandrapuram, Godavari </«, M. P. 

Ramaleshwar, Mahi Kanta, Bo. P. 

Ramallakot, Kumool dis^ M. P. 

Raman, Thar and Parkar dis, Smd, Bo. P. 

Ramandrug, //. and cant, Bellary dis^ M. P. 

Ramapatam, Nellore diSy M. P. 

Ramapatnam, z. Coimbatore diSy M . P. 

Ramas, s, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Ramaswamikanave, fu>. Nanjarajpat, taly Coorg, M. P. 

Rambag, Cuttack diSy Orissa, B. 

Rambha, Ganjam disy M. P. 

Rambhadrapur,/i{V, Midnapore dity B. 

Rambhapur, par^ Bheel a. C. I. A. 

Rambihar, /a/*, Narsinghgarh j. C. I. A. 

Rambrai, s, Khasi and Jaintia Hills diSy A. 

Ramchandrapur, Tipperah disy B. 

Ramchawand, /ar, Durbhunga diSy Behar, B. 

Ramda, Sylhet dity A. 

Ramdas, fair and /./. Amritsar dis, P. 

J<amdurg, e, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Ramdwara, /./. Tonk, $, R, A. 

Rameshwar, Ahmednagar diSy Bo. P. 

Ramesvaram, Madura diSy M. P. 

Ramganp^ r. Kumaun disy N. W. P. 

Ramgani, s, d, Noakholly disy B. 

Ramgarn, Hazaribagh diSy Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Rarogarh, Midnapore, diSy B. 

Ramgarh dtfy Jeypore, s. R. A. 

Ramgarh, e, Bhopal a. C. I. A. 



Ramgarh, 7?. Barwani s, C. I. A, 

Ramgarh, Gwalior j. C. I. A, 

Ramgarh, Ludhiana <///, P. 

Ramgarh, Mandla diSy C. P. 

Ramgarh, Shahabad dis. Behar, B. 

Ramgarh, Ulwur s. R. A. 

Ramgarh, Umballa diSy P. 

Ramghat, Bulandshahr diSy N. W. P. 

Ramgir, Chumparun diSy Behar, B. 

Ramgopalpur, Mymensingh dis B, 

Ramjibanpur, Midnapore diSy B. 

Ramkola, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Ramkot, par, Sitapur diSy Oudh, N W. P. 

Ramkunda, Lohardugga diSy Chota-Nagpur, B. 

Ramman, r. Darjeeling <//>, B. 

Ramnad, s. Madura diSy M. P. 

Ramnagar, Bara hankidify Oudh. N, W. P. 

Ramnagar, Benares dis, N. W. P. 

Ramnagar, Chumparun disy Behar, B. 

Ramnagar, fairy Gujranwala dis P, 

Ramnagar, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Ramnagar, Fyzabad diSy Oudh, N. W. P. 

Ramnagar, Kumaun r/w, N. W. P. 

Ramnagar, Mandla diSy C. P. 

Ramnagar, Midnapore </«, B. 

Ramnagar, Nuddea disy B. 

Ramnagar, par, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Ramor, /. Banswara s, R. A. 

Rampa, z. Godavari diSy M. P. 

Rampal, Jessore dify B. 

Rampeli, Bhandara ///>, C. P. 

Rampore Bauleah, /ar, Rajshahye diSy B. 

Rampore Haut, s.d. Moorshedabad diSy B. 

Rampur, s. Rohilkhand, N. W. P. 

Rampur, Baghelkand C. I. A. 

Rampur, s. Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Rampur, Bashahr s. P. 

Rampur, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Rampur, Nanjarajpatna /«/, Coorg, M. P. 

Rampur, Jaunpur dis, N. \V. P. 

Rampur, /ar, Hazaribagh dity Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Rampur, pttr, Partabgarh diSy Oudh, N. W. P. 

Rampur, /. and/ar, Saharanjpur ^IVV, N. W. P. 

Rampur, Sambadpur r//j, C. P. 

Rampur, Sunth s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Rampura, Ahmed abad disy Gujarat Bo. P. 

Rampura, e. Sankhera Mewas s. Rewa Kanta, 

Bo. P. 
Rampura, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 
Rampura, Jalaun diSy N. W. P. 
Rampura, /ar, Indore /. C. I. A. 
Ramree, i. and /. Kyoukhpyoo dis, B. B. 
Ramsagar, Bankoora /^zx, B. 

Ramsanehighat, s, d. Bara Banki disy Oudh, N. W. P. 
Ramsej, Nasik diSy Bo, P. 
Ramshila, A, Gya diSy Behar, B. 
Ramsor, Ajmere dis, R. A. 
Ramtal, /. Darjeeling dity B. 
Ramtek, s. d, Nagpur dis, C. P. 
Ram Thamman, /k>, Lahore dis, P. 
Ramtirath, fairy Lohardugga diSy Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Ram Tirtha, Wun dis, Berar, H. A, D. 
Ramu, Chittagong dis, B. 
Rana, r. Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 
Ranadhaoan, /vxr, Mymensingh dis, B. 
Ranaghat s. d, Nuddea dis, B. 



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Google 



( Ixxxix ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



Kanala, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 

Kanapur, fiar, Bheel a. C. I. A. 

Kanasan, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Ranchee, c,s, Lohardagga Ms, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Rander, Sural <fis. Bo. P. 

Randhikpur, Baria j, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Randia Orgoda, par, Balasore <//>, Orissa B. 

Raneegunge, Burdwan if is, B. 

Raneh, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Ranga, r. A. 

Rangagora, Lakhimpur iiis, A. 

Rangamati,/, r, Goalpara dis, A. 

Rangamatia, cap, Chittagong Hill Tracts (fis, B. 

Ranganadi, r. Lakhimpur t/ts, A. 

Rangapur, deel, Jessore Ms, B. 

Rangaswami, A. Nilgiri Ms, M. P. 

Rangaswamibetta, A. Bangalore Ms, Mysore s. M. P. 

Rangbi, vaiUy, Darjeeling Mr, B. 

Rangchepgiri, A. 

Rangdai, A. 

Rangi, s, Chanda Ms, C. P.. 

Rangia, Kamrup Ms, A. 

Rangir, Saugor Ms, C. P. 

Rangit, Darjeeling Ms, B. 

Rangit r. Darjeeling Ms, B. 

Rangiya, Kamrup Ms, A. 

Rangjuli, Goalpara Ms, A. 

Rangmagirit Garo Hill Ms, A. 

Rangoon, cap, and s,g. B. B. 

Rangpur, Muzaffargarh Ms, P. 

Rangpur, oiii cap, Sibsagar Ms, A. 

Rangrenggiri, A. 

Rangsagar /. Dungarpur s. R. A. 

Ran^nia, Chittagong Ms, B. 

Ram, A. 

Rani, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Rania, Gurdaspur Ms, P. 

Rania, (Sirsa) Ms, P. 

Rani Amraoti, Wun Ms, Berar, H. A. D. 

Ranibennur, /a/, Dharwar Ms, Bo. P. 

Rani Dungri, h, Kishengurh s, R. A. 

Raniganj, Partabgurh Ms, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Raniganj, /. nndpar, Pnmeah Ms, Behar, B. 

Ranigarh,//. Partabgarh s, R. A. 

Ranikhet, canf, and san, Kumaun Ms, N. W. P. 

Ranipet, North Arcot Ms, M. P. 

Ranipokhri, Dehra Dun Ms, N. W. P. 

Ranipur, Jhansi Ms, N. W. P. 

Ranipur. Jalaun Ms, N. W. P. 

Ranisankail, Dinagepore Ms, B. 

Ranital, Kangra Ms, P. 

Raniangaon, Ahmednagar Mr, Bo. P. 

Ran^angaon, Poona Ms, Bo, P. 

Ranjia, Gwalior s, C, I. A. 

Rankala, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Ranmachan, Chanda Ms, C. P. 

Rannadi, r. Cuttack ifis, Orissa, B. 

Ranod, Gwalior /. C. I. A. 

Ranpur, Ahmedabad Ms, Bo. P. 

Ranpur, A, Thar and Parkar Ms, Sind, Bo. P. 

Ranpur, /.j. Pooree Jis, Orissa, B. 

Ranthambhor,//. Jeypore s, R. A. 

Ranwan, Mooltan Ms, P. 

Raokhanwala, Jhang Ms, P. 

Raona, A. 

Raona, Burdwan Ms, B. 



R. 

Raozan, Chittagong Ms, 6. 

Rap» Upper Sind Frontier Ms, Sind, Bo. P. 

Rapri, Mainpuri Ms, N. W. P. 

Rapti, r. Oudh and N. W. P. 

Rapur, /a/, Nellore Ms, M. P. 

Rar, /. Thar and Parkar Ms, Sind, Bo. P. 

Rarh, par, Moorshedabad Ms, B. 

Rarmo, /. Thar and Parkar Ms, Sind, Bo. P. 

Raruli-Katipara, Jessore Ms, B. 

Ras, Jodhpore s. R. A. 

Ranpur, Balasore Ms, Orissa, B. 

Rasan. Banda Ms, N. W. P. 

Rasdhan, Cawnpore Ms, N. W. P. 

Rasia, A. Bhurtpore s, R. A. 

Rasidpur, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Rasin, Ahmednagar Ms, Bo. P. 

Rasipuram, Salem Ms,- M. P. 

Rasmancha, 24-Perp;unnahs Ms, B. 

Ras Muari, cape, Smd, Bo. P. 

Rasol, Cuttaek Mr, Orissa, B. 

Rasra, /./. Ghazipur Ms, N. W. P. 

Rasubaygudd, Belgaum Ms, Bo. P. 

Rasulabad, Cawnpore Ms, N. W, P. 

Rasulabad, Wardha Ms, C. P. 

Rasulganj, A. 

Rasulpur, Burdwan Ms, B. 

Rasulpur, Gurgaon, Ms, P. 

Rasulpur, r, Midnapore Ms, B. 

Rasulpur, Muttra</«, N. W. P. 

Rasulpur Ghaus, Basti Ms, N. W. P. 

Ratabari, Sylhet, Ms, A. 

Ratadevi, sA, Tonk s. R. A. 

Rataghara, A, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Ratan, r. Partabgarh, s, R. A. 

Ratangarh, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Ratangarh, Bickaneer, s, R. A. 

Ratangarh, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Ratangarh, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Ratanjila Ms, Jeypore, s, R. A. 

Ratanmal, e. Bheel a. C. I. A. 

Ratanpur, Basti Ms, N. W. P. 

Ratanpur, Bilaspur Ms, C. P. 

Ratanpur, A, Cuttack Ms, Orissa, B. 

Ratesh,/. Keonthal s. Simla Ms, P. 

Rath, /. and s. d. Hamirpur dis, N, W. P. 

Rathaidoung, Akyab dis, B. B. 

Ratha-purushottampur, Pooree, dis, Orissa, B. 

Rathasan, A, Oodeypore s, R. A. 

Rathian, Jhelum dis, P. 

Ratial, Jhelum dis, P. 

Ratnagar, /. Bheel a. C. I. A, 

Ratnagir, A, Jodhpore s. R. A. 

Ratnagiri, cc^p and dis. Bo. P. 

Ratodero, tal, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Ratti, par, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Rattia, Hissar Ms, P. 

Ratti-halli, Dharwar Ms, Bo. P. 

Ratwa, Gwalior /. C. I. A. 

Raua, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Raudha, Hissar dis, P. 

Raunapar, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Rautara, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Raver, Khandesh dit, Bo. P. 

Raver, Nimar dis, C. P. 

Ravet Punawala, Poona dis, Bo P. 

Ravi, r. P. 



L 

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( xc ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



Rawa, Gwalior /. C. I. A. 

Rawai, dis, Sirohee s.K, A, 

Rawalpindi, ^ap, can/, dis, said fair, P. 

Rawalya, A. Oodcypore s. R. A, 

Rawangaon, Poona rfir, Bo. P. 

Rawatsar, Bickaneer s. R, A. 

Raya, Muttra dts, N. W. P. 

Raya, Sialkot tfts, P. 

Rayacheruvu, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Rayachoti, tal, Cuddapah dis, M. P. 

Rayadrug, /. and /a/, Cuddapah dis, M, P. 

Rayagadda, Vizagapatam dis, M. P« 

Rayakota, Salem dts, M. P. 

Rayalcheru, Bellary dts, M. P. 

Rayapuram, r.f. Madras ^/tx, M. P. 

Rayan, Jodhpore s. R. A. 

Rayapetta, suburb, Madras towin, M. P. 

Rayavalasa, /. Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Raybag, Kolhapurx. Bo. P. 

Raybag Prant, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Raychand, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Raydak, r. A. 

Raydak, r. Cooch Behar and Darjeeling dis, B. 

Raydih, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Raydom, par, Mymensingh dis, B. 
Raygarh, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Raygarh Killa, Colaba dis. Bo. P. 

Raygram, Jessore dis, B. 

Raymangal, r, 24-Pergunnahs ///r, B. 

Raymurdha, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Rayna, Burdwan dis, B. 

Raypura, Dacca dis, B. 

Reddipalle, Cuddapah dis, M. P. 

Redi, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

R^ru, r. Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Regyee, Bassein dis, B. B. 

Rehar, Bijnor dis, N. W. P. 

Rehli, /. and s.d, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Rejauli, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Remuna, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Rendwar, Jalaun dis, N. W. P. 

Rengan, e. Sankhera Mewas s. Rewa Eanta, Bo. P. 

Rekapalle, z. Godavari dis, M. P. 

Rengati Pahar, //. Cachar dis, A. 

Rengma, h. Naga Hills dit, A. 

Rengtan, h, Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Rem, Bicknaneer s. R. A. 

Renigunta, North Arcot dis, M. P. 

Reoti, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 

Repalle, tal, Kistna dis, M. P. 

Reri, Bickaneer s, R. A. 

Retam, r. C. I. A. 

Retayambadi, z. Madura dis, M. P. 

Reth, r, Oudh. N. W. P. 

Retra, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Rettayampadi, z, Madura dis, M. P. 

Revelgunge, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Rewadanda, Colaba dis. Bo. P. 

Rewah, cap, and s, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Rewa Kanta, t,e, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Rewari, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Rewas, Colaba dis. Bo. P. 

Riah, s,d. Sialkot dis, P. 

Ricbha,/ar, Bareilljr //w, N. W. P. 

Richhal, cr, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Rigauli, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 



Rigra, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Rihand, r. N. W. P. 

Rikhabdeo, p,p, Oodeypore /. R. A. 

Rind or Arind, r, N. W. P. 

Ringnand, par, Dewaj /. C. I. A. 

Ringnod, Gwalior x. C. I. A. 

Ripu, duar, Goalpara dis, A. 

Rishikishan, tern, Sirohee x. R. A. 

Rishikund, springs Monghyr dis, B. 

Risod, Basim dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Rithaura, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Ritpur, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Riwat, Rawalpindi/^, P. 

Robertsganj, /. and s,d, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Rodha, Hissar dis, P. 

Ko\i, par, Gyvi dis, Behar, B. 

Roha, tai, Colaba dis, BoJ P. 

Rohama, Cuttack dis, Orissa B. 

Rohan Khed, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Rohanpur, Maldah dis, B. 

Rohat, Jodhpore x. R. A. 

Rohilanwali, Muzaf&rgarh dis, P. 

Rohilkhand, or Rohilcund, t,c. N. W. P. 

Rohini, Sonthal Pergunnahs, Behar, B. 

Rohini, Midnapore dis, B. 

Rohini, r. Darjeeling dis, B. 

Rohira Bhor, x. Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Rohna, Wardharfix, C. P. 

Rohri, fai, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Rohtak, cap, and dir, P. 

Rohtang, /. Kangra dis, P. 

Rohtas, par, Shahabad dir, Behar, B. 

Rohuaman, bed, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Rohuwa, p.p. Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Rojhan, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Rojhan, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P* 

Rojo, /i. Jcldhpore x. R. A. 

Rokai, r, A. 

Rokha Jais, par, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Ron, tal, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Ronaba, z, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Ronahi, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Roopnarayan, r. Midnapore and Hooghly dis, B. 

Rookee /. can/, and s,d. Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Roran, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Roranwali, Jhang dis, P. 

Ron, Sirsa dis, P. 

Ron, Umballa dis, P. 

Roro, r. Singhbhoom dit, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Rorsa, r. Kamrup dis, A. 

Rosa, Shahjahanpur dis, Rohilkhand, N. W. P. 

Roserha, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Roshanabad, Farukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Rotas, o/d, ft. Jhelum dis, P. 

Rotasgarh, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Roth Budruk, Colaba dis. Bo. P. 

Roth Khurd, Colaba dis. Bo. P. 

Royail, Dacca dis, B. 

Royapettah, suh. Madias, M. P. 

Royapuram, sub, Madras, M. P. 

Royis, h. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Rudarpur, Gorakhpur r/tx, N. W. P. 

Rudarpur, Tarai dis, N. W. P. 

Rudauli, Basti dis, N. W. P. 

Rudauli, /ar, Bara Banki^ix, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Rudawal, Bhurtporex. R. A. 



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( xci ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



R. 



Rudrapur, Gorakhpur </«, N. W. P. 

Rudraprayag, p.p. Garhwal a¥j, N. \V. P. 

Ruhana, Benares ftis, N . W. P. 

Ruia, deel, Jessore dis^ B. 

Rnkmini, r. A. 

Ruknpur, par, Rajshahye (it's, B. 

Ruknpur, Rungpore dir, B. 

Rukunadeipur, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Ruma, Chittagong Hill Tracts <//>, B. 

Rumbah, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Rumka Thul, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Rundha, Rajpipla s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Rungli Rungliot, Dai^eeling </iV, 6. 

Rungpore, cap and t/is, B. 

Runija, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Runisayadpur, Muzufiferpore <///, Behar, B. 

Runkuta, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Rupadaha, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Rupaheli, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Rupal, Madii Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Rupar, Umballa dis, P. 

Ruparel r, Bhurtpore x. R. A. 



R. 

Rupbas, dis, Bhurtpore s, R. A. 

Rupganj, Dacca dis, B. 

Rupkalia, A. 

Rupnagar, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Rupnagar. /. Rajpipla s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Rupnagarh, par, Kishengurh s. R. A. 

Rupnarayan, /./. Oodeypore s. R. A. 

Rupnarayan, r. Midnapore dis, B. 

Rupnath, Khasi and Jaintia Hills dis. A. 

Rupshaha, r. Jessore dis, B. 

Rupsi, A. 

Rura, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Rurka (Kalan), Jullundur dis, P. 

Rusera, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Rushikulya, r. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Russa, 24-Pej^nnahs dis, B. 

Russelkonda, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Rustam, Peshawar dis, P. 

RusuUabad, Unao<//V, Oudh N. W. P. 

Ruthiai. Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Rutlam, s. Western Malwa a. C. I. A. 

Rwatoung, Thayetmyo dis, B. B. 



Sabalgarh,//. Bijnor^/j, N. W. P. 

Sabalgarh, dis, and ft. Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Sabanjg^, par, Midnapore dis, B. 

Sabari, r. Upper Godavari dis, C. P. 

Sabarmati, r. Ahmedabad //w, and Mahi Kanta, Bo. P 

5abhaganj, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Sabhapur, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Sabhar, r. Dacca dis, B. 

Sabi, r. Ulwur s. R. A, 

Sabi, Mahi Kanta Bo. P. 

Sabzalkot, Dera Ghazi Khan, dis, P. 

Sabzimandi, sud, of Delhi city, Delhi dis, P. 

Sachak, Hooghly dis, B. 

Sachendi, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Sachin, s. Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Sachor, Jodhpore s. R. A. 

Sadabad, par, Muttra dis, N. W. P. 

Sadalgi, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Sadanpur, Chittagong dis, B. 

Sadarbagicha, Cachar dis, A. 

Sadarbazar, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

■Sadarpur, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Sadashivgad, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Sadashivgarh, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Sadat, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 

Sadha, /a/, Dholpur S. R. A. 

Sadhaura, /air, Umballa dis, P. 

Sadhuhati, Jessore dis, B. 

Sadhuhati, Nuddea dis, B. 

Sadhuhati, 24-Pergunnahs dis, 6. 

Sadiachandpur, Pubna dis, B. 

Sadikpur, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Sadiya, cant, Lakhimpur dis, A. 

Sadra, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Sadras, Chingleput dir, M. P. 

Sadri, Jodhpore s. R. A. 

Sadrpur, par, Sitapur dis, Oudh, N. W, P. 



Sadullaganj, Budaun dis, N. W. P. 

Sadullannagar, par, Gonda dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Sadullahpur Maldah dis, B. 

Safdarganj, Bara Banki dis, Oudh N. W. P. 

Safdarjang, Delhi dis, P. 

Saf)rai, coal tract, Sibsagar</«V, A. 

Safipur, s.d. Unao dis, Oudh N. W. P. 

Sagar, Shimoga dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Sagardi, par, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Sagarmati, r. Ajmere </w, R. A. 

Sagar Taloo, /. Bheel a. C. I. A. 

Sagarwha, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Sagbara, Rajpipla s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Sagiler, r. Cuddapah^tV, M. P. 

Sagor, par, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Sagri, s.d, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Sagtaia, Baria s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Sagthali, /. Partal^arh s, R. A. 

Sagwara, Dungarpur s, R. A. 

Sahabad, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Sahar, Muttra dis, N. W. P. 

Sahar, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Saharanpur, cap, and dis, N. W. P. 

Sahami, par, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Sahasram, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Sahaswan, Etah dis, N. W. P. 

Sahaswan, par, Budaun dis, N. W. P. 

Sahatwar, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 

Sahawal, Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Sahawar, par, Etah dis, N. W. P. 

Sahdoke, Gujranwala dis, P. 

Sahebganj, Burdwan dis, 6. 

Sahebgunge, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Sahebnagar, /ar, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Sahib ganj, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

SahiL^mj, Backergnnge dis, B. 

Sahipur, 24-Pei^unnahs (/ij, B, 



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( xcii ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



8. 

Sahispur, BiJDor dis, N. W. P. 

Sahiti,/.^!. Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sahiwa, Bickaneerx. R. A. 

Sahiwal, Shahpur dis, P. 

Sahjad, r. N. W. P. 

Sahuspur, Dehra Dun dis, N. W. P. 

Sahyadri, Aundh s, Satara dis^ Bo, P. 

Sahyadri, ^.Nasik and Khandesh </i/| Bo. P. 

Sai, r. Oudh and N. W. P. 

Sai, r. Tanna </m, Bo. P. 

Saiber, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Saidabad, Hyderabad dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Saidabad, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Saidan, Rawalpindi disy P. 

Saidan Baoli, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Saidapet, /a/, Chingleput dis, M. P. 

Said Mahmud, Amritsar dis, P. 

Saidpur, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Saidpur, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Saidiya, Hyderabad </«>, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sai%aaj, Pumeah disy Behar, B. 

Saighata, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Saila, par, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Sailana, s, Wn. Malwa a C. I. A. 

Sailkopa, Tessore dis, B. 

Sailwara, Mandla dis, C. P. 

Sailkheri, Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

Saini, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Sainpur, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Sainta, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Sainkhera, Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

St. Thomas* Mount, cant, Chingleput dis, M. P. 

Saipu, Muttra dis, N. W. P. 

Sairi, Simla dis, P. 

Sajan Sawai, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sajeti, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Sajli, r, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Sajna, r, N. W. P. 

Sajna, Lalitpur dis, N. W. P. 

Sajner, r, Gwalior j, C. I. A. 

Sakaldiha, Benares <tfj, N. W. P. 

Sakan, r, Jubbulpore dis^ C. P. 

Sakarhalpur, Tonk j, R. A. 

Sakami, r, Partal^:arh dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Sakatpur,/ar, Farukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Sakesar, san, Shahpur dis, P. 

Sakharabad, par, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Sakharparh, Aundh s, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Sakhana, Backergunge dis, B. 
Sakharwah, ca, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sakheda, Baroda s, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Sakhi Sarwar, /./. Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Sakhwa, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Sakit, par, ^tah dis, N. W. P. 

SakkarepatQQ, Kadur dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Sakleshp t, par, Mysore /, M. P. 

Sakoli, v., Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Sakra, ^onk t, R. A. 

Sakra, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Sakrand, tal, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo . P. 

Sakrar, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Sakrawa, par, Farukhabad dis, N. W. P 

Sakrej, Hazaribagh <^/j, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Sakri r, Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Sakri, r, Gya. dis, Behar, B. 

Sa krigali, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 



& 

Sakse, Colaba dis, Bo. P. 

Saktesgarh, Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Sakti, s, Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Saktigarh, Burdwan dis, B. 

Saktipur, Moorshedabad dis, B. 

SakuUpur, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Salabatkhan, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Salabatpur, Ahmednagar dis, Bo. P. 

Salai, Wardha dis, C. P. 

Salaiya, Baghelkhand C. I. A. 

Salambha, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Salandi, r, Balasore dis, Orissa, B 

Salasar, Bicknaneer s, R. A. 

Salaun, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Salawas, Todhpore s, R. A. 

Salaya, liallar dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Salbai, Gwalior x, C. I. A. 

Salbaldi, Ellichpur dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Salbani, Midnapore dis, B. 

Sd Beyt, i, Katt)rwar, Gujarat Bo. P. 

Salem, cap and dis, M. P. 

Salemabad, f>ar, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Salempur, Aligaih dis, N. W. P. 

Salempur, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Salempur, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Salempur Mahua, par, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Salepur, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Saler, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Saletekri, 2, Balaghat dis, C. P. 

Salhawas, Rohtak dis, P. 

Sali, r, Burdwan dis, B. 

Salia, r, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Saliamangalam, Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Saligram, r, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Salikha, Jessore dis, B. 

Salil-Arrah, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Salimabad, Burdwan dis, B. 

Salimabad, Kishengurh s, R. A. 

Salimpur, par, Budaun dis, N. W. P. 

Saliyamangalam, r,s. Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Salkocha, A. 

Salmara, Goalpara dis, A. 

Salandi, r, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Salon, s,d, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Salpara, Goalpara dis, A. 

Salsette, tal, Tanna dis, Bo. P. 

Salshi, r, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Saltora, Bankoora dis, B. 

Salt Range, m, P. 

Salu, Hyderabad, Nizam's Dominions. 

Salu, Wardha dis, C. P. 

Salumbar, dis, Oodeypore j, R. A. 

Salur, s, Vizigapatam dis, M. P. 

Salween, r, B. B. 

Samadhiala, Ahmedabad dis, Bo. P. 

Samagol, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 

Sama^ting, Naga HiWs dis, A. 

Samai, par, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Samaleshwar, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P- 

Samalkot, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Samalpati, Salem dir, M. P. 

Samalpur, /ar, Purneah dis, Behar, B. 

Samana, Karnal dis, P. 

Samanga, ^ee/, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Samangarh Kolhapur s.. Bo. P. 

Samanta^ Nuddea dis, B. 



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Google 



( xciii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



S. 

Samara, r. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Samarkha, Kaira dir, Bo. P. 

Samaro, Thar and Parkar t/is, Sind, Ba P. 

Samasatta, Bahawalpur, s, P. 

Samastipur, Durbhunga tits, Behar, B. 

Samatur, Coimbatore if is, M. P. 

Sambalpur, cap, and r/<>, C. P. 

Sambalpur, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat Bo. P. 

Sama3ra!nallur, r,s, Madura <///, M. P. 

Sambhal, par, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 

Sambhar, can/, and /. Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Sambhuganj, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Sambrani, Kanara, dis^ Bo. P. 

Sambrial, Sialkot dis, P. 

Samdari, Jodhpore /. R. A. 

Samdhi, Palanpur x. Gujarat. Bo. P. 

Samel, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Samer, par, Indore s. C. I. A. 

Sameswari, Garo Hills dis, A. 

Sami, Radhanpur s. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Sami Nellur, Madura dis, M. P. 

Samlaji, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Sanmamir, Satara^fj, Bo. P. 

Samnasgi, Dharwar dts. Bo. P. 

Samncr, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Samod, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Samoi-ka-pahar, A, Bheel a, C. I. A. 

Sampgaon, /a/, Belgaum dis, Bo. P. 

Sampagi,/. South Kanara dis, M. P. 

Sampla, Kishengurh s, R. A. 

Sampla, Rohtak dis, P. 

Sampna, r. Betul dis, C. P. 

Samra, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Samrala, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Samthar, s. Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Samti, Muzaffargarh dis, P. 

Samudragarh, Burdwan dis, B. 

Samukpota, Jessore dis, B. 

Samulcottah. Godavari dis, M. P. 

Samundri, Jhang dis, P. 

Sanahwal, Ludhiana dis, P. 

Sanand, tal, Ahmedabad dis, Bo. P. 

Sanaut, far, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Sanawad, Indore s. C. I. A. 

Sanawad, Nimar dis, C. P. 

Sana wan, s.d. Muzaffargarh dis, P. 

Sanawar, san, Simla dis, P. 

Sanbhalkha, Karnal dis, P. 

Sanchi, Bhopal j. C. I. A. 

Sandar, dec/, Jessore dis, B. 

Sandero, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Sandha,/a;, Patna //ir, Behar, B, 

Sandi, par, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Sandila, s,d. Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Sandip, /. and r. Noakholly dis, B. 

Sandosi, Colaba dis. Bo. P. 

Sandoway, cap and dis, B. B. 

Sandur, s. Bellary dis, M. P. 

Sandwa, Bickaneer s, R. A. 

Sandwip, t. Chittagong dis, 6. 

Sangakhera, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Sangam, Kaladgi dis, Bo. P. 

Sangam, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Sangameshwar, /a/, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Sangam MahuU, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Sai^mner, /. and A?/, Abfpednagar dis, Bo. f, 



s. 

Sangamvalasa, i. Vizgapatam dis, M. P. 

Sanganur, Jeypore, s. R. A. 

Sangarhi, Bhandara dis, C. P. 

Sangari, Hazaribagh, dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Sanghai, Jhelum dis, P. 

Sanghar, /./. Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Sanghar, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sanghaur, Umballa dis, P. 

Sanghi, Rohtak dis, P. 

Sanghola, Delhi dis, P. 

Sangipur, Partabgarah dis, Oudh, N. W; P. 

Sangjani, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Sangli, cap, and s. Bo. P. 

Sangola, /a/, Sholapur dis, Bo. P. 

Sangramgarh, Partabgarh dis, Oudh, N, W. P. 

Sangrampur, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Sangrar, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sangri, r. and s. Simla ^f>, P. 

Sangnir, Jind s, P. 

Sangtikopp, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Sangu, r. Chittagong a'w, B. 

San^vi, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Sanichari. Gwalior s, C. I. A, 

Sanir Haor, A. 

Sanisganj, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Sanivarsante, par, Coorg, M. P. 

Sanjai, r. Singbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Sanjan, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Sanjeli, e. Balasinor s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Sanjhoro, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sanjit, par, Jaora s. C. I. A. 

Sanka, Narsinghgarh s, C. I. A. 

Sankaranainarkoil, /a/, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Sankarapuram, South Arcot </tj, M. P. 

Sankaridrug Salem dis, M. P. 

Sankarkati, /air, 24-Pergunnahe dir, B, 

Sankarpasa, Sylhet dis, A. 

Sankarpur, Chanda, dir, C. P. 

Sankeshwar, Belgaum dis, Bo. P. 

Sankeshwar, /. /. Radhanpur s. Bo. P. 

Sankh, r. Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Sankh, r, Gwalior s. C. I. A, 

Sankhatra, Silakot dis, P. 

Sankheda Bahadurpur, Baroda x, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Sankhun, Bickaneer, s, R. A. 

Sankli, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 

Sankosh, r. Goalpara dis, A. 

Sankosh, r. Rungpore and Cooch Behar, B. 

Sankrail, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Sankrail, Hooghly dis, B. 

Sann, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sanora, c, Sankhera Me was j. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Sanpadar, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Sanri, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sanr Mata, //. OodeypoJe s. R. A. 

Sansar Dhara, fa/is, Dehra Dun dis, N. W. P. 

Sanskut, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Santail, dec/, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Santal Khal, kAa/, Noakholly dis, B. 

Santalpur, ia/, Radhanpur s. Bo. P. 

Santanutalapadu, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Santapilli, /. A. Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Santaveri, Kadur dis, M]rsore s, M. P. 

Santekasalagere, Mysore dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Santemarahalli, Mysore dis, Mysore s, M. P, 

Santhal, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo, ?, 



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( XCIV ) 



Alphabetical Index. 



S. 

Santhia, Pabna dis^ B. 

Santhu, Jodhpore s, R. A. 

Santipore, Nuddea, (iis^ B. 

Santnathji, /. /. Tonk /. R. A. 

Santosh, beel^ Rajshahye dis^ B. 

Santrapur, Cuttack dis^ Orissa, B. 

Sanwat, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Saoli, Baroda ;. Gujarat Bo. P. 

Saoli, Chandar/w,C. P. 

Saoligarh, /. r. Betul dis, C. P. 

Saoner, Nagpur dis^ C. P. 

Sapan, r. Berar, H. A. D. 

Saphala, Tanna dis^ Bo. P. 

Sapleja, r, Backergnnge dis, B. 

Saptasring, Nasik, dis^ Bo. P. 

Saptur, s. Malabar dis^ M. P. 

Sapuamundi, h, Cuttack dit^ Orissa, B. 

Sara, Banda dis^ N. W. P. 

Sara, /, Pooree dis^ Orissa, B. 

SaJa, Pubna ^i>, B. 

Sara, par^ Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Saradhna, Ajmere dit^ R. A. 

Saragaj, h. Sylhct dis^ A. 

Saragaon, Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Saragara, par^ Balasore dis^ Orisso, B. 

Saragur, Mysore dis^ M3rsore j. M. P. 

Sarai Aghat, Etah dis, N. W. P. 

Sarai Akil, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Sarai Amanat Khan, Amritsar dis, P. 

Sarai Girdhari, EUh dis, N. W. P. 

Sarai Hamid, /ar, Durbhunga dis, Behar B. 

Sarai Kalu, Rawalpindi dis, P. 

Saraikela, /. and s,d, Singbhoom dit^ Ch-Nagpore, B. 

Sarai Khwaja Jaunpur dis^ N. W. P. 

Sarai Mughal, Lahore dis^ P. 

Sarai Mahiuddin Jaunpur dis^ N. W. P. 

Sarai Mamre z, Allahabad </i>, N. W. P. 

Sarai Mir, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Sarai Mughal, Lahore aiSf P. 

Sarai Naurang, Bannu dis^ P. 

Sarai Nazarbagh, fair, Peshawar </f>, P. 

Saraisa par, Mozuflferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Sarai Sadr, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Sarai Sidhu, Mooltan dis, P. 

Sarai Sitaram, Deihi dis, P. 

Sarakanei, Madura dis, M. P. 

Sarai, /. Goal para dis, A. ^ 

Saranda, h. S ingbhoom dis, Chota Nagpore, B. 

Sarneshwar Maluideo, p,p, Sirohee x. R. A. 

Sarangajore, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Sarangarh, s. Sambalpor </i>i C. P. 

Sarangi Bheel a. C. I. A. 

Sarangkhera, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 

Sarangoi, Pooree dis, OriMo, B. 

Sarangpur, par, Dewas s, C. I. A. 

Sararchar Mymensingh dis, B. 

Saras, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Saraswati par, Cuttack dis, Olissa B. 

Saraswati, r. P. 

Saraswati, r. Hooghly and 24-Pergunnahs dis, B, 

Saraswati, r. Palanpnr and Radhanpur /. Bo. P. 

Saratha port, Balasore dis, Orissa, d. 

Sarauli, par, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Sarayan, r. Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P# 

Sarbaibandha, A. 

Sarbban, Surat dis^ Bo. P, 



s. 

Sarbhanga, Baghelkhand, C. L A. 

Sarbhon, Surat dis. Bo. Vs 

Sarda or Chauka, r. Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Sarda, r. N. W. P. 

Sarda, Rajshahye dis, 6. 

Sardam, par, Hazaribagh tHs, Chota-Nagpore, B, 

Sardargarh, Bickaneer s. R. A. 

Sardarshahr, Bickaneer x. R. A. 

Sardeipur, Pooree dis, Orissa, B, 

Sardha, r. Oudh, N. W. P. 

Sardhana, p.p, and s,d, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Sardhar, Hallar dis, Katty war. Bo. P. 

Sardhara, A. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sardharidhar, Hallar diSf Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Sardharo, p.p, Thar and Parkar tits, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sardiha, Midnapore dis, B. 

Sardua, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Sareni, par, Rae Bareli dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Sareshpur, m. r. Cachar dis, A. 

Sargan, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Sarguja, s. Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Sarh, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Sarhad, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sarhali, Amritsar dis, P. 

Sarhatta, Rungpore dis, B. 

Sarhind, Umballa dis, P. 

Sarh Salimpur, par, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Saria, Baghelkhand, C. L A. 

Sarigram, S bsagar dis, A. 

Sarila,/. Bundelkhand, C. I. A. 

Sarisha, 34-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Sarishpur, A. 

Sarispur, h. A. 

Sarispur, k. 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Sarjapur, Bangalore dis, Mysore /. M. P. 

Saiju or Siiheli, r. Kheri dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Saiju, r. N. W. P. 

Sarkar Valavendi Mitta, t, Salem dis^ M. P. 

Sarkhej, Ahmedabad dis. Bo. P. 

Sarmehra, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Sama, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Sarnath, /./. Benares dis, N. W. P. 

Saroli, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Saromannagar, par, Hardoi dVx, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Saroth, cant, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Sarpai, can, Midnapore dis, B. 

Sarrail, Tipperah dis, B. 

Sarsa, AUahadad dis, N. W. P, 

Sarsa, Kaira dis, Bo. P. 

Sarsa, r. N. W. P. 

Sarsaganj, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Sarsan, Sunth s, Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Sarsati, r. Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sarsaul, Cawnpore </i.f, N. W. P. 

Sarsawa, Sahamnpur dis, N. W. P. 

Sarsha, Nuddea dis, B. 

Sarsura, p.p, Kishengurh s, R. A. 

Sarsuti, r. Kamal dis, P. 

Sarsuti, r. Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Sarta, tributary, Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Sarthachor, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Saru, h, Lohardugga dis, Cbota-Nagporef B. 

Sarukshetri, A. 

Saru Manas, r. Kamrup dis, A. 

Sarun, cap, and dis, Benar, B. 

Sarupnagar, a4-Pergttimab» dis^ B» 



Digitized by ^ 



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( xcv ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



& 

Sarwan, Sonthal Pergunnahs diSf B. 

Sarwar, dis^ Kishengurh f. R. A. 

Sarwar, Ajmere </«, R. A. 

Sarvakot Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Sarvasiddhi, /a/, Vizagapatam dis^ M. P. 

Sasanga, Burdwan dis^ B. 

Sasni, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Sasseram, /. nnd s.d. Shahabad dis^ Behar, B. 

Sasu, r. Lakhimpur dis^ A. 

Sasur Khaderi, r. N. W. P. 

Saswad, Foona dis^ Bo. P. 

Satalgaon, Kaladgi disy Bo. P. 

Satamba or Vingorla, Colaba mV, Bo. P« 

Satana, Nasik dis^ Bo. P. 

Satankulam, Tinnevelly dis^ M. P. 

SataDwari, jfit, Bhopal x. C. I. A. 

Satara, cap^ and diSf Bo. P. 

Satasi,/flr, Budaun <jtfx, N. W. P. 

Satbaura, Lohardugga dis^ Chota-Nagporc, B. 

Satdar, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P, 

Satgachi, Burdwan dis^ B. 

Satgaon Dinarpur, A. A. 

Satgaon, Hazaribagh dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Satghur, North Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Satghara, Montgomery dis, P. 

Sath, disy Sirohee s. R. A. 

Sathamba, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Sathana, Ajmere dis^ R. A. 

Sathasna, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Sathbatia, ferry^ Cuttack r/w, Orissa, B, 

Sathi, Chumparun </ir, Behar, B. 

Saihiari, /ar, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B, 

Sathla, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Sathlana, Jodhpore, s. R. A. 

Satirhat, Midnapore dis, B. 

Satiyavizianagaram, North Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Satkhania, Chittagong dis^ B. 

Satkhira, /. and s.d. 24- Pergunnahs dis^ 6. 

Satlasna, s, Mahi Kanta, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Satmala, h. Khandesh dit^ Bo. P. 

Satmala, h. Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Satmalan, par, Balasore dis^ Orissa, B. 

Satna, r. Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Satpati, Midnapore dis, B. 

Satpati, r. Tanna dis^ Bo. P. 

Satpura, Ellichpur dis^ Berar, H. A. D. 

Satpura, m. r. Indore s, C. I. A. and Khandesh 

dif^ Bo. P. 
Satrah, Sialkot dis, P. 
Satrikh, Bara Banki dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Satrujitpur, Jessore </ij, B. 
Sat-saika, Burdwan dis, B. 
Sattenapalle, /a/, Kistna dis^ M. P. 
Sattankulam, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 
Sattarganj, Kumaun dis, N. W. P. 
Satti, Belgaum dis^ Bo. P. 
Sattivedu, Chingleput dis, M. P. 
Satur, tal, and s. Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 
S^turi, Manbhoom dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 
Satwas, par^ Indore /. C. I. A. 
Satyabadi, Pooree r/ij, Orissa, B. 
Satyamangalam, /a/, Coimbatore dis^ M. P. 
Sauda, /a/, Khandesh r/iV, Bo. P. 
Saugor, cap^ and dis^ C. P. 
Saugor, I. and /. h. 24- Pergunnahs </i>, B. 
Saundana, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 



Saundatti, Belgaum dis^ Bo. P. 

Sauner, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Saunra, r. Pumeah dis^ Behar, B. 

Saurath, p.p. Durbhanga dit^ Behar, B, 

Saurikh, par, Farrukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Sausar, /. and s. d. Chhindwara dis^ C. P. 

Savandurga, k. Bangalore dis, Mysore x. M. P. 

Saveri, r. Godavari </«>, M. P. 

Savitri, cr. Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P.. 

Savitri, r. Colaba </ix. Bo. P. 

Savudam, z. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Sawabi, Peshawur dis, P. 

Sawalsang, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Sawan, Gwalior, s. C. I. A. 

Sawanamal, Rohtak dis, P. 

Sawant Wari or Sundar Wari, cap, and x. Bo. P. 

Sawanur, x. Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Sawar, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Sawar, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Sawarda, Ratnagiri dis. Bo. P. 

Sawargaon, tal, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Sawargaon, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Sawargaon, Wun dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Sawari, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Sawli, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Sawyerpuram, Tinnevelly rfi'r, M. P. 

Sayadpur, Dinagepore dis, B. 

Sayadwala, fair, Montgomery dis, P. 

Sayan, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Sayan, Surat dis. Bo. P. 

Sayar, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Sayauri, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Saykhera, Nasik dis, Bo. P. 

Sayla, tal, Jhalawad dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Sayyi<lE3nj>ar, Jalaun dis, N, W. P. 

Sayvidpur Bhitari, /./. Ghazipur, dis, N. W. P. 

Sayyidpur, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Sayyidpur, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Say yid raja, Benares dis, N. W. P. 

Sayyidwala, Montgomery dis, P. 

Se- '- ':, d. and j«^, Calcutta, 24-PergnnnahsflVx,B. 

Secunderabad, cant, Hyderabad, Nizam*s Dominions. 

Sedsai, Colaba dts. Bo. P. 

Seebpore, Hooghly dis, B. 

Seetabuldee, cant, Nagpur dis, C. P. 

Seetamurhee, r.x.andx.^i^. Mozufiferpore aSrx. Behar, B. 

Segaon, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Seghur, /. Nilgiri dis, M. P. 

Segowlie, catit, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Seharsol, Burdwan dis, B. 

Sehawa,/.r. and t.c. Raipur dis, C. P. 

Sehore, cant, and par, Bhopal x. C. I. A. 

Sehwan, cap, and dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sckhat, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Selapur, Buldana</rx, Berar, H. A. D. 

Selere, r, Vizagapatam di*, M. P. 

Selem, A. 

Seleru, r. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Selgaon, Buldana dit, Berar, H. A. D. 

Selu, Wardha dts, C. P. 

Semaria, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Sembhar, Pdanpur x. Bo. P. 

Semli, Tonk x. R. A. 

Semra, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Semraun, par, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Semri, Hoshangabad </iV, C. P. 



Digitized by 



Google 



( xcvi ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



Sen, r. Tonic s. R. A. 

Senaot, par, Balasore rfis, Orissa, B. 

Sendamangalam, Salem <//>, M. 1*. 

Sendgarsa, A. Sonthal Pergunnahs ^is, B, 

Sendhwa, /L and par, Indore s. C. I. A. 

Sendra, Ajmere ftis, R. A. 

Senduijana, Amraoti aUf, Berar, H. A. D. 

Sencrar, r. N. W. P. 

Scnhati, ^essore dis, B. 

Senpahari, Burdwan iiis, B. 

Senthal, Bickaneer s.K. A. 

StohsLtiL, par, Bijnor dis, N. W. P. 

Seonath, or Sco, r. Raipur dis, C. P, 

Seondra, Moradabad t/is, N. W. P. 

Seoni, cap, and dis, C. P. 

Seoni, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Seopur, Gwalior t, C. I. A. 

Seorinarayan, s.d, Bilaspur dis, C. P. 

Sepau, /./. Dholpur s, R. A. 

Serajgang, Pubna dis, B. 

Seramau, Shahjahanpur dts, N. W. P. 

Serampore, c,s, and s.d, Hooghly dis, B. 

Sergada, «, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Sergar, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Serghar, z. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Seringapatam, Mysore /. M. P. 

Sessa, Lakhimpur dis, A. 

Setur, z. Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Sevagiri, «. Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Sevalpatti, z. Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Seven, r. Godavari dis, M. P. 

Sevvapet, r,s, Chingleput dis, M. P. 

Sewa, Kamal dis, P. 

Sewan, Karnal dis, P, 

Sewanor Aliganj, c,s. and s,d, Saran dis, Behar, B. 

Sewani, Hissar dis, P. 

Sewli, Rae Bareli, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Shabachalla, A. Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Shabang, Midnapore dis, B. 

Shabkadar, /t. Peshawar dis, F. 

Shadad, r, Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Shadhan Lund, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Shadiabad, Ghazipur </w, N. W. P. 

Shadipur, Kohat dis, P. 

Shadulapur, Rungpore dis, B. 

Shafakhana, Kumaun^^'x, N. W. P. 

Shahabad, dis, Behar, B. 

Shahabad, s.d, Hardoi dis, Oudh, N. P. W. 

Shahabad, Kashmir/. P. 

Shahadad, Tonk s. R. A. 

Shahabad, Hyderabad, Nizam's Dominions. 

Shahabad, Umballa dis, P. 

Shahada, fal, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 

Shahakund, Baghelkand, C. I. A. 

Shah Alam, Dera Ismail Khan dis, P. 

Shahamad, Montgomery dis, P. 

Shahapur, par, Belgaum dis, Bo. P. 

Shahapur, Sangli s. Bo. P. 

Shahapur, iai, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Shahawari, Ahmedabad ^2/, Bo. P. 

Shahbandar, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Shahband^r, /. andtal, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Shahbazar, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Shahbaz Khel, Bannu dis, P. 

Shahbaznagar, Shahjahanpur dis, N. W. P, 

Sbahdadpur, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 



& 

Shahdadpur, tal, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Shahdara, /. and^t'r, Lahore////, P. 

Shahdara, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Shahdaura, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Shahganj, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Shahganj, Jaunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Shahgani, Mirzapore dis, N. W P. 

Shahgarh, Jeysulmere s, R. A. 

Shahgarh, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Shahgharib, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Shah Hamir, r. Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Shah Hassan, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Shahi, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Shah-i-Buldan, p,p. Tonk j. R. A. 

Shahjahanpur, cap, and dis, N. W. P. 

Shahjahanpur dis, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Shahjahanpur, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Shahjahanpur, par, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Shahjahanpur, Meerut dis, N. W. P. 

Shahjahanpur, par, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Shah-ji-kur, r. Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Shahkapur. Karachi dts, Sind, Bo. P. 

Shahkot, Jhang dis, P. 

Shahkot, Jullundur //i>, P. 

Shah Muhammad Wali, Jhelum dis, P. 

Shahpur, Baghelkhand, C. L A. 

Shahpur, Beerbhoom dis, B. 

Shahpur, cap, and dis, P. 

Shahpur, Gurdaspur dis, P. 

Shahpur, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Shahpur, Mandla dis, C. P. 

Shahpur, Kangra dis, P 

Shahpur, Saugor dis, C. P. 

Shahpur, Muzaflfamagar dis, N. W. P. 

Shahpur, Nimar dis, C. P. 

Shahpur, par, Pumeah dis, Behar, B. 

Shahpur, Nimar dis, C. P. 

Shahpur, 24- Pergunnahs </i>, B. 

Shahpur, Betul dis, C. P. 

Shahpur, Umballa <iJt>, P. 

Shahpur, h, Mandla dis, C. P. 

Shahpur, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Shahpura, Betul dis, C. P. 

Shahpura, Jeypore s. R. A, 

Shahpura, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Shahpura, Oodeypore x. R. A. 

Shahpura, Mandla dis, C. P. 

Shahpuri, 1. Arakan, div, B. B. 

Shahr Sawad, sub, Agra city, Agra dis, N. W. P. 

Shahr Farid, Bahawalpur x. P. 

Shahr Sultan, /ii>, Muzaffargarh dis, P. 

Shah Sadrdin, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

ShahwaH, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Shah Yakik, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Snahzadpore, Pubna dis, B. 

Shahzadpur, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Shahzadpur, Umballa dis, P. 

Shaikhawati, pr, Jeypore x. R. A. 

Shaikhpura, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Shaikhsar, Bickaneer x. R. A. 

Shaikwah or Sadiya, see Sadiya, A. 

Shail, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Shailadhukri, beel, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Shailakupa, Jessore dts, B. 

Shaistabad, Backergunee dis, B. 

Shajalpujr, Narsinghgarh x. C. L A» 



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( xcvii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



Shajanwa, Gorakhpur </ij, N. W. P. 

Shaiapur, Gwalior j. C. I. A. 

Shakar, r. Chhindwara rfw, C. P. 

Shakar darra, Kohat diSf P. 

Shakar, r, Narsinghpur disj C. P. 

Shakargarh, Gurdaspur dis^ P. 

Shakund, Bhagalpur diSf Behar, B. 

Shalbani, Midnapore dis^ B. 

Shall, h, Simla dis, P. 

Shalika, Jessore dis, B. 

Shalmala, r. Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Shalwari, Dharwar </i>, Bo. P. 

Shamdihi,/MV, Burdwan</2>, B. 

Shamganj, Rungpore dis, B. 

Shamgarn, /ar, Ajmere dis^ R. A. 

Shamhu, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Shamir, Gujranwala dis, P. 

Shamli, s.d, Muzaffamagar dis^ N. W. P. 

Shamnagar, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Shampur, Rungpore dis^ B. 

Shampur, Hownah dis, B. 

Shamsabad, Farukhabad dis^ N. W. P. 

Shamsabad,'Agra </i>, N. \V. P. 

Shamsabad, Gwalior /. C. I. A. 

Shamsergad, Belgaum dis. Bo. P. 

Shamsha, r. Mysore s, M. P. 

Shamsherganj, Sylhet </«, A. 

Shamuni Khatak, Bannu dis^ P. 

Shanivarsante, Yelsavirshime, /a/, Coorg, M. P. 

Shankara, h, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, B. 

Shankargarh, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Shankargarh, Peshwar dis^ P. 

Shankhatirtha, r. Mysore s. M. P. 

Shankodhar, Indore s, C. I. A. 

Shanllyagari, khaly Rajshahye dis, B. 

^hanur, r. Berar, H. A. D. 

Shaora, Midnapore disy B. 

Shapur, beely Jessore */xV, B. 

Shapur, beely Midnapore rfw, B. 

Shapur Pati, Shahabad disy Behar, B. 

Sharada, r. Vizagapatam r/n, M. P. 

Sharafuddinpur, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Sharakpur, /. and /ai>, Lahore diSy P. 

Sharangagram, Sibsagar, disj A. 

Sharanur, Malabar disy M. P. 

Sharavati, r. Mysore s.M.V, 

Sharetalli, Travancore j. M. P. 

Shariakandi, 'Bogto. dis, B. 

Sharifpur, Mainpuri diSy N. W. P. 

Sharmanavati, r. Mysore s, M. P. 

Sharsha, Nuddea dis, B. 

fjharupkati, Backergunge, dit, B. 

Sharwala, Dera Ghazi Khan diSy P. 

Shastri Jaygarh, cr, Ratnagiri dit, Bo. P. 

Shatashringaparvata, A, Kolar dis, Mysore J. M. P. 

Shatrujitpur, Jessore </m, B. 

ShatuI, /. Bashahr t. P. 

Shedhi, r. Kaira dis. Bo. P. 

Shepon, Akola</iV, Berar, H. A. D. 

Sheiawad, Kanara dis, Bo. P. 

Shekhan, Thang </iV, P. 

Shekh Bhirkio, Hyderabad dis, Bind, Bo. P. 

•Shekh Budin, Bannu dn, P. 

Shekh Budin, h. Dera Ismail Khan dts, P. 

Shekh Faiil, Montgomery </w, P. 

t>hekhupura, Gujranwala dis, P. 



s. 

Shekhwali, Dera Ghazi Khan dis, P. 

Shelidah, Nuddea dis, B. 

Sheila, J. Khasi and Jaintia Hills dii, A. 

Shenbagh, Noakhally disy B. 

Shendurni, par, Khandesh dtr. Bo. P. 

Sheogaon, /a/, Ahmednagar ^/f'r. Bo. P. 

Sheohar, Mozufferpore dis^ Behar, B. 

Sher, r. Seoni dtSy C. P. 

Sheraingil, Travancore s. M. P. 

Sherbal, Belgaum dUy Bo. P. 

Shergarh, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Shergarh, Muttra (As, N. W. P. 

Shergarh, Tonk s. R. A. 

Shergarh, Shahabad dtSy Behar, B. 

Shergarh, Upper Sind Frontier dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sherghotty, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Sheri, r. Lunawara s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Sherighasha, Bannu dis, P. 

Sher Kandi, Bogra dis, B. 

Sherkot, Bijnor dis, N. W. P. 

Shermadavi, Tinnevelly diSy M. P. 

Shermuhammadpuram, s. Vizagapatam rftV, M. P. 

Sherpur, Bogra dis, B. 

Sher pur, Mozufferpore dis, Behar, B. 

Sherpur, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Sherpur, Ghazipur dis, N. W. P. 

Sherpur, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 

Sherpur, par, Mymensingh dis, B. 

Sherpur, Rungf>ore dis, B. 

Sher Shah, fair, Mooltan dif, P. 

Shershahabad, par, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Shertally, Travancore s, M. P. 

Shevaroy Hills, san, Salem dis, M. P. 

Sheshgarh, Bareilly dis, N. W. P. 

Shetrungi, //. HaWaidis, Kattywar Bo. P. 

Shetrunjo, Gohelwad dis, Kattywar Bo. P. 

Shewa, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Shewara, e, Sankhera Mewas s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Shiamgarh, Kamal dis, P. 

Shiba^aha, r. Jessore dis, B. 

Shibchar, Furreedpore dis, B. 

Shibganj, c,s. Maldah dis, B. 

Shit^anj, Bogra dis, B. 

Shibi,/./. TumkuT dis, Mjrsorex. M. P. 

Shiggaon, Dharwar dis. Bo. P. 

Shihni, Mooltan dis, P. 

Shikarpur, cap, and dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Shikarpur, Chumparun dis, Behar, B. 

Shikarpur, par, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 

Shikarpur, Nuddea dis, B. 

Shikarpur, Shimoga dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Shikarhat, Jessore dis, B. 

Shikohabad, s,d, Mainpuri dis, N. W. P. 

Shikrapur, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Shilaidaha, 24- Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Shilakuti, A. 

Shillong, cap, son, and s.^, Khasi Hills, A. 

Shimoga, cap, and dis, Mysore j. M. P. 

Shimsha, r. Tumkur dis, Mysore s, M. P. 

Shimulia, Midnapore dis, B. 

Shingatgeri, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Shingnapur, Kolhapur s. Bo. P. 

Shingnapur, Satara dis. Bo. P. 

Shingti, Howrz dis, B. 

Shinkiari, Hazaradfij, P. 

Shinor, Baroda s, Gujarat, Bo. P. 



M 

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( xcviii ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



8. 

Shinpura, catU, Ajmere dis, R. A. 

Shinda, Satara dis^ Bo. P. 

Shirali, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

ShinuDpur, Hazaribagh dis^ Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Shirawatiy r. Kanara dis^ Bo. P. 

Shirhatti, Sangli s. Bo. P. 

Shirhatti, /. Dharwar //i>, Bo. P. 

Shirol, Dharwar dis^ Bo. P. 

Shirol, Kolhapur j. Bo. P. 

Shirpur, tal, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Shirsha, Midnapore dis, B. 

Shirsoli, Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

SMrvegudda, Kanara dis^ Bo. P. 

Shirwada, Ratnagiri dis^ Bo. P. 

Shirwal, Bhor s, Satara r/ij, Bo. P. 

Shirwan, Hazara dis^ P. 

Shita, r. Mysore s, M. P. 

ShiUba, r. Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Shitgarh, Tanna dis. Bo. P. 

Shiugarh, e. Western Malwa a, C. I. A. 

Shiunar, Mozufferpore dis^ Behar, B. 

Shiali, Cawnpore dis^ N. W. P. 

Shiupur, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Shiupur. Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Shiupur, p.p. Benares du, N. W. P. 

Shiurajpur, Allahabad dis, N. W. P. 

Shiurajpur, Fatehpur//«, N. W. P. 

Shiurajpur, /. and par^ Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Shiv, r. Partabgarh s. R, A. 

Shjvaganga, //. Bangalore e//f, Mysore j. M. P. 

Shivaganga, z. Madura dis, M, P. 

Shivalaya, Dacca *//>, B. 

Shivbara, Dang s. Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 

Shivnad, f. Khandesh dis. Bo. P. 

Shivnar, p.p. Patna dis^ Behar, B . 

Shivner,//. Poona //jj, Bo. P. 

Shiwapur, Poona dis^ Bo. P. 

Shiwapur, Sawantwari s. Bo. P. 

SMwrajpur, Hazarilmgh dis^ Chota- Nagpore, B. 

Shiyali, /. and tal, Tanjore dis^ M. P. 

Sholagarh, Dacca dis, B , 

Sholaguri. A. 

Shola Mohana, Midnapore dis^ B. 

Sholapur, capf and dis^ Bo- P. 

Sholavandan, Madura fl&x, M, P. 

Sholinghur, r.s. North Arcot dis^ M. P. 

Shoranur, Malabar dis^ M. P. 

Shorapur, Nizam's Dominions, H. 

Shorepur, Dehra Dun dis, N. \V. P. 

Shoreyar, r. Cochin x. M. P. 

Shorkot, Jhang disy P. 

Shoro, Upper Sind Frontier dis^ Sind, Bo. P. 

Shraranbelgola, Hassan dis^ Mysore, s. M. P. 

Shravanbelgolabetta, h, and /./. Hassan dis, 

Mysore, j. M. P. 
Shribati, Burdwan dis^ B. 
Shridharpur, Jessore </w, B. 
Shrigonda. /. and tal^ AJimednagar^ij, Bo. P. 
Shrikhanda, Burdwan dist B. 
Shrikol, Jessore dis^ B. 
Shrikrishnapur, Cuttack </i>, Orissa, B. 
Shri Nagar,/.^.t. Palanpurx. Bo. P. 
Shringcri,/./. Kadur dis^ Mysore s, M. P. 
Shripur, Jessore </i>, B. 
Shripur, 24-Pengunnahs dis^ B. 
Shriwardhan Janjira s. Bo. P. 



8 

Shujabad, Mooltan dis, P. 

Shujanagar, /0r, Rajshahye //<V, B. 

Shajanpur, Gurdaspur dit^ P. 

Shujaulpur, y?. Gw^ior x. C. I. A. 

Shnkartar, p.p. Muzaffiimagar r//x, N. W. P. 

Shukna, valleyt Darjeeling <//>, B. 

Shukrguzari, Rungpore dis, B. 

Shulaiyar, r. Madura dis, M. P. 

Shunkar, beel, Jessore dis, B. 

Shuria, deel, Rajshahye dif, B. 

Shnrshuni, dee/, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Shushuni, r. Bankoora dis, B. 

Shwedoung, Promc dis^ B. B. 

Shwcgyeng, cap, and dis, B. B. 

Shwelay, Prome dis, B. B. 

Shyamgram, Tipperah dis, B. 

Shjramsundarpur, par, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nag- 

pore, B. 
Siadi, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 
Sialba, Umballa dis, P. 
Sialkot, can/, cap, and dis, P. 
Siana, par, Bulandshahr dis, N. W. P. 
Siani, Jhalawad dis, Kattywar, Bo. P.j 
Siba, Kangra dis, P. 
Sibhok, Darjeeling dis, B. 
Sibi, Tumkur dis, Mysore s. M. P. 
Sibi, Afghanistan. 
Sibpur, Sibsagar dis, A. 
Sibsagar, cap, and dis, A. 
Siddapur, tal, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 
Siddhagarh, p.h.i. Sawantwari s. Bo. P. 
Siddhaur, par, Bara Banki dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 
Siddhavattam, /. and tal, Cuddapah dis, M. P. 
Siddheswar, tern, Sylhet dis, A. 
Siddheshwari, r. Sonthal Peigunnahs dis, Bdiar, B, 
Siddhirdona, kJial, Noakholly dis, B. 
Sidhatek, Ahmednagar dis, Bo. P. 
Sidhhat, Cuttack dis, Orissa, B. 
Sidhout, tal, Cuddapah dis, M, P. 
Sidhpur, Baroda, Gujarat/. Bo. P. 
Sidhua Jobna, par, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 
Sidhwal, Kamal dis, P. 
Sidlagatta, Kolar dis, Mysore s. M. P. 
Sidlagundi or Bedti, r. Kanara dis. Bo. P. 
Sidli, dtmr, Goalpara dis, A. 
Sidmukh, Bickaneer j. R. A, 
Sighra, Benares dis, N W. P. 
Sigur,^ Nilgiri dis, M. P. 
Sihal, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 
Sihawal, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 
Sihodra, Tonk s. R. A. 
Sihoj, r. Gwalior s. C. I. A. 
Sihol, Dinagepore, dis, B. 
Sihonda Girwan /. and par, Banda dis, N. W. P. 
Sihor, Gohelwad dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 
Sihora, e. Pandu Mewas s. Bo. P. 
Sihora, par, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 
Sihora, Bhandara dis, C. P. 
Sihora, sM. Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 
Sihori, tcU, Radhanpur s. Bo. P. 
Sihra, Hyderabad dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Sija or Kamargachi, Hoogly dis, B. 
Sijawal, tal, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 
Sim, Garo Hills dis, A. 
Sikal, Tanjore dis, M. P. 
Sikan, r. Durbhunga, dis, Behar, B. 



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Google 



( xcix ) 
Alphabetical Index. 



8. 

Sikandarabad, s, d, Bulandshahr dis^ N. W. P. 

Sikandarpur, Gurgaon dis^ P. 

Sikandarpur, /ar, Azamgarh dis, N. W. P. 

Sikandarpur, /ar, Unao dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Sikandra, Agra, dis, N. W. P. 

Sikannra, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Sikandra, par, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Sikandra, /ar, Allahabad dis, N. \V. P. 

Sikandra, par, Azamgarh dis, N . W. P. 

Sikandra, par, Cawnpore dis, N. W. P. 

Sikandra, Monghyr tlu, Behar, B. 

Sikandra, Umlmlla dis, P. 

Sikandra Rao, Aligarh dis, N. W. P. 

Sikar, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Sikarpur, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Sikarwar, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Sikarwari, dis, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Sikhar, ft, Benares dis, N. W. P. 

Sikkim, s, B. 

Sikkil, r.x. Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Siko, Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Sikrai, dis, Jeypore s, R. A. 

Sikrara, Jaunpur dis, N. W. P. 

Sikraul, Benares dis, N. W. P. 

Sikri, Bhurtpore s, R. A. 

Sikri, Delhi dis, P. 

Sikti, Pnmeah dis, Behar, B. 

Sila, Rawalpindi du, P. 

Silanath, Mozuffeipore dis, Behar, B. 

Silani, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Silania, Noakholly dis, B. 

Silao, Patna dis, Behar, B. 

Silawad, Barwani s, C. I. A. 

Silchar or Cachar, cap, and dis, A. 

Silda, Midnapore dis, B. 

Sildubi, A. 

Sileman, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Silghat, Nowgong dis, A. 

Silhat, J>ar, Gorakhpur dis, N. W. P. 

Silhaun, fair and /./. Saran dis, Behar, B. 

Silheti, s. Raipur du, C. P. 

Sili, Lohardugga dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Siliguri, c,s, Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Siliserh, /. Ulwur s, R. A. 

Silkuri, Cachar dis, A. 

Siller, r. Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Sillana, x. Malwa, C. I. A. 

Silor, r. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Silpata, Darrang dis, A. 

Silwani,/ar, Bhopal x. C. I. A. 

Silye, r. Midnapore, and Manbhoom dis, B. 

Simaria, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B, 

Simaria, Sanin^ij, Behar, B. 

Simauni, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Sim£a, s.d, Raipur dis, C. P. 

Simhachallam, sh. Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Simla, cap, dis, san, and s.g. P. 

Simlapal, par, Manbhoom dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Simlia, e. Sankhera Mewas s. Rewa Kanta, Bo. P. 

Simra, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Simrauta, /. and par, Rae Bareli t/zV, Oudh, N.W.P. 

Simri, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

SimuUa, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Simultala, Sonthal Pergunnahs dis, Behar, 6. 

Simuriya, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Sina, r. Ahmednagar dis^ Bo. P. 



8. 

Sinanwan, MuzafTargarh dis, P. 

Sinaphna, r. Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Sincnal, A, Darjeeling dis, B. 

Sinchula, r. Jalpaiguri dis, B. 

Sind, pr. Bo. P. 

Sinda, Tonk s. R. A. 

Sindewaki, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Sindgi, ial, Kaladgi dis, Bo. P. 

Sindh, r. Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Sindh, r. N. W. P. 

Sindhan, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Sindhara, Indorex. C. I. A. 

Sindh Sagar Doab, /.c, P. 

Sindi, Wardha dir, C. P. 

Sindkhed, Akola dir, Berar, H. A. D. 

Sindkhed, Buldana dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Sindkhera, Khandesh dis, Bo. P. 

Sindri, Jodhpore j. R. A. 

SinduTJana, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Sindwah, ca, Shikarpur dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Singa, /. Bashahr s, P. 

Singahi, Kheri dis, Oudh, N. \V. P. 

Singalantapuram, z. Salem dis, M. P. 

Singalila, A. Darjeeling dis, B. 

Singampatti, z. Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Singanama, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Singanallur, r.s, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Singaperumalkoil, r,s, Chingleput dis, M. P. 

Singaraj, A. Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Singaraya Konda, Nellore dis, M. P. 

Singardaha, dee/, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Singari, A. 

Singha, Jessore dis, B. 

Singaurgarh ft. Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Singhala, par, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Singhana, e. Indore s, C. I. A. 

Singhana, Jeypore s. R. A. 

Singhasan Tekri, Bhcel a, C. I. A. 

Singhbhoom, dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Singheshwarthan, fair, Bhagalpur dis, Behar, B. 

Singhia, Durbhunga dis, Behar, B. 

Singhora, h, Sambalpur dis, C. P. 

Singhpur, Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

Singhpur, par, Hazaribagh dis, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Singpur, Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Singhul, ^r, Monghyr dis, Behar, B. 

Singiman, r. Cooch Behar s. B. 

Singirampur, /./. Farukhabad dis, N. W. P. 

Singla, Balasore dis, Orissa, B. 

Singla, /.r. Sylhet dis, A. 

Singmari, Goalpara dis, A. 

Singoli, Gwalior s, C. I. A. 

Singori, Chhindwara dis, C. P. 

Singpur, Dang /. Khandesh dis. Bo, P. 

Singra, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Singramau, Jaunpur r/i'x, N. W. P. 

Singrauli, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Singrauli, s.d. Mirzapur dis, N. W. P. 

Singri, r. Narsinghpur dis, C. P. 

Singur, Hooghly dis, B. 

Sinha, Shahabad dis, Behar, B. 

Sinhgarh, A, Poona dis. Bo. P. 

Sinjhauli, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Sinnar, /ai, Nasik dis. Bo. P. 

Sinor, Baroda s. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Sinre, deel, Jessore dis, B. 



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Alphabetical Index. 



S. 

Sinti, 24-Pergunnahs dis, 6. 

Siohara, Bijnor rf/j, N. W. P. 

Sipah, /ar, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Sipna, r. Berar, H. A. D. 

Sipra, r. Gwaliorj. C. I. A. 

Sipri, cant, Gwalior s. C. I. A. 

Sir, r. Chanda t/is, C. P. 

Sir, r. Shikarpur <hs, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sira, Tumkur dis, Mysore s. M. P. 

Siracha, Hyderabad t/is, Sind, Bo. P. 

Siradi, /. South Canara </«, M. P. 

Sirain, par, Pooree </?>, Orissa, B. 

Sirakot, ft. and tem, Kumaun /iVx, N. W. P. 

Siral, o.tt, Ahmednagar t^is, Bo. P. 

Sirala, Amraoti itis^ Berar, H. A. D. 

Siralkoppa, Shimoga efts, Mysore s, M. P. 

Sirani, Hyderabad </m, Mysore j. M. P. 

Sirawali, Gujranwala ^i/, P. 

Sirasgaon, Ellichpur rtTiV, Berar, H. A. D, 

Sirasghat, Lalitpur (/is, N. W. P. 

Sirathu, Allahabad i/is, N. W. P. 

Sirauna, Chumparun t/is, Behar, B. 

Sirdarpore, cant, Bheel a, C. I. A. 

Sirguppi, Dharwar t/is, Bo. P. 

Sirhind, U, P. 

Sirhpura, par, Etah dis, N. W. P. 

Siringashira, ^. Singhbhoom ^/j, Chota-Nagpore, B. 

Siris, par, Gya dis, Behar, B. 

Sir Kanda, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Sirkhed, Amraoti dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Sirmaur, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Sirmur (Ndhan) s. P. 

Sirohi, /. Thar and Parkar dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sironcha, cap, Chanda dis, C. P. 

Sironj, Tonkj. C. I. A. 

Sirpur, Basim dis, Berar, H. A. D. 

Sirpur, Wardha dis, C. P. 

Sirpur, Bheel a. C. I. A. 

Sirr, c.r, Karachi dis, Sind, Bo. P. 

Sirsa, cap, and dis, P. 

Sirsangi, Belgaum ^/u>. Bo. P. 

Sirsawa, Saharanpur dis, N. W. P. 

Sirsi, Gwalior J. C. I. A. 

Sirsi, Moradabad dis, N. W. P. 

Sirsindi, «. Chanda dis, C. P. 

Sirsi, /a/, Kanara dis. Bo. P. 

Siruguppa, Bellary dis, M. P. 

Sirumalai, A. Madura dis, M. P. 

Sirur, Ahmednagar dis. Bo. P. 

Sirur, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Sirur, ta/, Poona dis, Bo. P. 

Sirutandanallur, Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Sirvel, tai, Kurnool dis, M. P. 

Sisak Tlang, //. Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Sisana, Rohizk dis, P. 

Sisawan, Sarun dis, Behar, B. 

Sisia, Bahraich dis, Oudh, N. W. 

Sisolar, Hamirpur dis, N. W. P. 

Sispara, p. Malabar dis, M. P. 

Siswa, Chumparun dis, Behar, 6. 

Sitabari, sA, Tonk s. R. A. 

SitabaJdi, or Seetabuldee, cant, Nagpur di/, C. P. 

Sitai, de€/, Pubna dis, B. 

Sitai, deei, Rajshahye dis, B. 

Sitakund, hot-spring, Monghyr, dis, Behar, B. 

Sitakund, p.p» Chumparun dts, Behar, B. 

Sitakund, /./. Partabgarh x. R« A. 



8. 



p. 



Sitakund, h, Chittagong dis, B. 

Sitakunda, Midnapore dis, B. 

Sitamau, s. Western Malwa a. C. I. A. 

Sitampetta, h, Vizagapatam dis, M. P. 

Sitamadi, r. South Canara dis, M. P, 

Sitanagar, Damoh dis, C. P. 

Sitanagaram, h. Kistna dis, M. P. 

Sitapahar, h, Chittagong Hill Tracts dis, B. 

Sitapur, cant, cap, and dis, Oudh, N. \V, P 

Sitapur, /. and / /. Banda dis, N. W. P. 

Sitar, r. Tanjore dis, M. P. 

Sitarampalli, Ganjam dis, M. P. 

Sitarampur, Burdwan dis, B. 

Sitha, Jhalawad dis, Kattywar, Bo. P. 

Sitimani, Kaladgi dis. Bo. P. 

Sitlaha,/ar, Baghelkhand C. I. A. 

Sitpur, MuzafTargarh </fV, P. 

Sitpura, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Situng, peak, Darjeelipg dis, B. 

Siv, r. Western Malwa a, C. I. A. 

Sivaganga, Madura dis, M. P. 

Sivakasi, Tinnevelly r/w, M.P. 

Swagirl, s. Tinnevelly dis, M. P. 

Siva kodu, Godavari dis, M. P. 

Sivasamudram, y^//r Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Siwai Jaipur, pr, Jeypore x. R. A. 

Siwai Madhopur, Jeypore j. R. A. 

Siwai Ramgarh, Jeypore x. R, A. 

Siwaliks, m.r, N. W. P. and P. 

Siwana, Jodhpore s. R. A. 

Siwas, par, Bhopal s. C. I. A. 

Siyana, Bulandshahr ^ex, N. W. P. 

Siyawari, Jhansi dis, N. W. P. 

Sleemanabad, Jubbulpore dis, C. P. 

Soane, r. Patna, Gya and Shahabad dis, B. 

Sobhapur, Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Sobnali, r. 24-Pergunnahs ^<x, B. 

Sobraon, b.f. Lahore dis, P. 

Sodepore, 24-Pergunnahs dis, B. 

Solasiramani, z. Salem dis, M. P. 

Sonepat, Delhi dis, P. 

Sohag, ca, Lahore dis, P. 

Sohagi, par, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Sohagpur, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Sohagpur, t, and s, d. Hoshangabad dis, C. P. 

Sohail, Etawah dis, N. W. P. 

Sohan, r. Rawalpindi <^, P. 

Sohana, Umballa dis, P. 

Sohawa, Jhelum dit, P. 

Sohawal, s, Baghelkhand, C. I. A. 

Sohdra, Gujranwala </ix, P. 

Sohna, Gurgaon dis, P. 

Sohuwala, Sirsa dis, P. 

Sohwal, Fyzabad dis, Oudh, N. W. P. 

Soit, Chanda </i J, C. P. 

Sojat, Jodhpore s, R. A, 

Sojima, Baroda x. Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Sojitra, Baroda s, Gujarat, Bo. P. 

Solani, r. N. W. P. 

Solari, //. Pooree dis, Orissa, B. 

Solaveram, Chingleput dis, M. P. 

Solisiramani, z, Salem dis, M. P. 

Solon, cant, Simla dis, P. 

Som, r. Dungarpur /. R. A. 

Somanur, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 

Somavarpet, Nanjarajpatna, tal, Cooig, M. P. 

Somanore, Coimbatore dis, M. P. 



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Alphabetical Index. 



S- 



Somavati,